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Notes for Henry Pickett

Henry Pickett settled on Piscataway Creek, which flows to the Rappahannock River, in Essex County, Virginia. The creek is a few miles inland, in the Tidewater section of Virginia. [1] [2] Documents suggest that Henry Pickett had two wives: Sarah and Elizabeth. Henry Pickett first appears in documents in Virginia in 1665.


1673 and 1719 maps showing Piscataway Creek, Virginia, just north of Dragon Swamp

1665 At a Vestry held September 26, 1665, "It was Ordered That Henry Pickett have Foure Hundred pounds of Tobacco paid him to Cure a Scald head of a Childe now in his Keeping, of William Baldwin's dec'd and that ye next Vestry the said Childe being Cast on the P'rish be bound to ye Said Pickett according to Law." [3] [4]

1650-1667 Both Mattaponi Native Americans and English colonists were moving to Piscattaway Creek, close to Tappahannock, Virginia on the Rappahannock River. [5]

By the early 1650s, the Mattaponi Indians had also left their homeland bordering the Mattaponi River and settled at the head of Piscataway Creek in what was then Old Rappahannock County, later Essex. In 1657, Tupeisens, the chief of the Mattaponi, and their council made a treaty with the justices of Old Rappahannock County, acknowledging that some of their people had trespassed or stolen livestock. The group’s leaders agreed that if any Mattaponi did so in the future, they would be tried under English law. In return, county officials promised that colonists who committed offences against the Mattaponi would be prosecuted. The Mattaponi had the right to hunt and gather outside of the colonists' fenced ground as long as they didn’t disturb the settlers’ livestock. The Indians agreed not to harbor fugitives and, if they surrendered fugitives to the authorities, they were to be rewarded with arms' lengths of roanoke. If the Mattaponi were to trespass or commit other offences, they were to be brought to the house of Owmohowtne, where they would be tried and made to forfeit some arms' lengths of roanoke (Old Rappahannock County Deeds &c. 1656-1664:28).

For a while, the Mattaponi seemed to have maintained a working relationship with the local justices and some of their European neighbors. In fact, in 1660, the Mattaponi chief and council, who met with the justices at the tribe's quiocassin house (or mortuary temple), testified that Francis Brown, who had patented land near their acreage on Piscataway Creek, had not disturbed them. However, the relationship seems to have soured within a relatively short time and, in 1661, Brown, James Vaughan, and Thomas Cooper were summoned to appear before the justices of Old Rappahannock County, where they agreed to pay the chief of the Mattaponi 50 matchcoats for the land in the Indians’ "old town." Moreover, Browne and three other settlers were ordered to give the “King of the Mattaponi” six matchcoats in compensation for the "Severall skins stolen from the Quiouhise house" (Old Rappahannock County Deeds &c. 1656-1664:111, 142, 249-250).

In 1662, the Mattaponi chief filed a legal complaint against Colonel Thomas Goodrich, who reportedly had set the chief’s English-style house ablaze in an attempt to drive him from his land at the head of the Piscataway Creek. Although the governor and his council ordered Goodrich to appear before the next session of the Quarter Court (the colony's highest ranking judiciary body), little seems to have been done in the way of legal redress. Goodrich, who had begun patenting land on the lower side of the Rappahannock River in 1657, enlarged his holdings until he owned literally thousands of acres in what became Old Rappahannock County. Between 1671 and 1680, Goodrich sold off the portion of land containing the old Mattaponi (“Pattipany”) Indian town, but he kept part of the property, which his heirs retained until 1686 (Old Rappahannock County Deeds &c. 1671-1676:7-8; 1677-1687:124; Essex County Deeds and Wills 1695-1699:50; McCartney 2012:175).

By 1667, the Mattaponi Indians had abandoned their town on Piscataway Creek. Francis Brown, who failed to make his court-ordered payment to the Mattaponi, sold his 750 acres that the Indians purportedly had deserted to Thomas Goodrich in March, 1667. A year later, Thomas Cooper conveyed his portion (1,100 acres) of what he called "Old Matapony … part of the Lands where formerly & lately the Mattapony Indians did Inhabit" to Goodrich, who was supposed to pay the Indians the matchcoats Brown owed (Old Rappahannock County Deeds &c. 1663-1668:381-383, 425-426; Hening 1901:II:274-275).

1670 Henry Pickett was appointed as a juror in Essex County, Virginia on April 30. [6] [7]

1673 Henry Pickett moved from Middlesex to (Old) Rappahannock county [now Essex county] and on December 6, Robert Armstrong and Dorothy, his wife, conveyed to Henry Pickett, of Middlesex County, cooper, 100 acres in Rappahannock County, in Piscatawa Creek and adjoining the Church road and the lands of William Johnson, John Whitt, and Mr. Petty. [8] [9] [10] [11]

1678 Henry (his mark H) Picket witnessed a deed from Thornton to Waters. Dated Ocober 20. [12] [13]

1680 In a list of debts in the account of William Travers, decd., estate, under date of 7ber 13, 1680, we find the item Exer't on Pickett's estate … 0 1400 [14] [15]

1687 In June, Henry sued the estate of Richard Cauthorne. [16] [17]

1688 Henry was a member of petit juries in October and November. [18] [19]

1692 Henry Pickett was appointed constable in May [Rappahannock county became Essex county in 1692]. [20] [21] [22]

1693 John Waters brought suit against Henry Pickett for improper seizure of goods belonging to Waters, while Waters was out of the country. [23] [24]

1697 John (X his mark) Camell, and Sarah his wife, of Southfarnham Parish, Essex County, for 2700 pounds of tobacco, convey to Henry Pickett, of the same parish and county, 100 acres in said Farnham parish, Essex county, back in the woods of Piscalacon Creek being part of land formerly belonging to John Killman, father of the said Sarah Camell, and which descended on death of said John to his son George Killman, by whose death it descended to his sister the said Sarah Camell; said land adjoins John Mitchell's land, a branch called the Greene Swamp and the Beverdam Swamp. One of the witnesses to this deed was Sarah Pickett. Dated January 20, 1696/97. [25] [26]

1697 John Campell and Sarah Kilman Campbell, his wife, appeared and acknowledged deed of sale of land to Henry Pickett … ordered recorded. The land, on Pascatacon Creek (later known as Cox's Creek) was previously owned by George Kilman. Dated May 10. [27] [28]

1698 John (X his mark) Amiss and Sarah (X her mark), his wife, of Sittingborn Parish, Essex County, for 300 pounds tobacco, conveyed to Henry Pickett, of Southfarnham Parish, Essex County, 500 acres in said Sittingborn Parish on the branch of the Cockelshell Creek, adjoining Deane and Clapham, a march of Portobago [Creek], and James Coghill's land. Dated December 12. [29] [30]

1698 Grandson William Pickett of Fauquier County sold, in 1761, part of the tract, purchased in 1698 by Henry Pickett, to James Kay. The land was bounded by a branch of Cockelshell Cr, a patent granted to William White now Dishman's line, Capt. Robert Rennolds, Thacker's line, Portobacco Swamp & Carter's line. [I have not found Cockleshell Creek on a map. Other deeds naming Robert Payne, John May, and Cockleshell Creek also name Occupation Creek, which is very close to Piscataway Creek, the original homestead of Henry Pickett.] [31][32] [33]. Note that grandson Henry Pickett inherited land on Cockleshell Creek from son William Pickett in 1743.

This indenture made this fifteenth Day of October … One Thousand seven Hundred and sixty one Between William Pickett of the County of Fauquier in the Colony of Virginia of the one part and James Kay of the County of Essex & Colony aforesaid … doth grant … two hundred sixty & seven acres of Land being part of a Tract of Five Hundred acres of land which was sold & conveyed by and from John Amiss and Sarah his wife unto Henry Pickett by Deed bearing date of Record in Essex County Court the 10th day of January 1698 … in the county of Essex and a smaller part thereof in the County of Caroline … bounded as followeth beginning at a red oak standing by a Branch of Cockelshell Creek and standing in a line of a Patant for land formerly granted to William White now Dishmans line thence running with Capt Robert Rennolds Line South … thence with said Thackers Line North … to another gum tree standing in a branch of Portobacco Swamp thence … to a marked white oak standing in Carters Line thence … to the beginning. … Wit. Robt Rennolds, Edward Vawter, Joseph Petterson, Wm Gibson, John Carter Junr. Proved 19 Oct 1761 & recorded. Attest: John Lee Junr clerk.

1699 John Amis acknowledged deed of sale of land to Hen: Picket, order recorded. Dated January 10, 1698/99. [34] [35]

1699 Henry Picket acknowledged an assignment of a deed of sale of a parcel of land to Thomas Hinds, Jr., which was ordered recorded; Elizabeth, wife of said Henry Pickett relinquished dower; order recorded. Dated November 10. This suggests that Sarah had died by this date. [36] [37] [38]

1700 Henry Pickett and Elizabeth his wife relinquished right, title and interest to John Pickett, in 100 acres of land which Robert Armstrong and Dorothy, his wife, had previously conveved to said Henry Pickett. Dated March 4. [39] [40]

1701 Henry Pickett received a patent for 80 acres of Rogue's Island at the mouth of Perry's Creek, on Rogue's island in the Piscataway River in Essex County. Dated October 24. The land had been granted to Jonathan Fisher on October 28, 1697 [41] but had been deserted. It was granted to Pickett on 15 April for transporting two persons into the colony: Ellinor Corne and Peter Lander. This was conveyed by son John Pickett to Richard Wise in 1709. [42] [43] [44] [Photocopy, Land patent page 1.] [Photocopy, Land patent page 2.]

1702 The last Will and Testment of Henery Picket was dated on August 10, in Essex County, Virginia. [45]

In the name of God, amen, I Henry Pickett being sick and weak of body but in perfect sinse and memory, Blessed be God for it, I do ordain this to be my last Will and Testament in a manner and form as followeth first rendering my soul to Almighty God my Creator next my body to the earth from whence it was taked, to be decently buryed as my executors as hereafter named shall see fite and as for that total estate it hath pleased God to bestow upon me I give as followeth:
Item: I give unto my tew (two) daughters, Hanah Spencer and Searah Fullerton each of them one shilling being a full part of their passession out of this my estate.
Item: I give unto my loving son, William Pickett, all my deventdet of Land being in the freshes of Rappahannock River to him and his heirs forever.
Itemi: I give unto my loving son, John Pickett all my debts which is owing of me and paying my debts which I owe.
Item: I give unto my loving wife, Elizabeth Pickett the lands where I now live on during her life also the half of my personal estate between her and the child that she now goeth with all the other half of my estate my son William Pickett ordaining my loving wife and my two sons John and William exeutris and executors of this my last will and testament aft witnessing my hands and seale this 18th day of October 1701. Henry (H) Pickett. Teste. William Johnson, William (X) Wilson, Richard (X) Edwards. Prov'd by the oathes of William Wilson and Richard Edwards in Essex County Court ye 10th day of Aug't 1702.

Henry died in March of 1702. At the April court, Henry's widow, Elizabeth, brought the Will in for Probate, but she didn't present the Will until the August court. It was then recorded 10 August 1702. The names of two of the witnesses to Henry's Last Will &Testament, William Wilson and Richard Edward, are not known and were not associated with Henry in previous records. They were possibly friends or relatives of Elizabeth. [46]

1702 John Pickett and William Pickett gave bond as executors. Dated on 10 9ber (November). [47] [48]

1703 Inventory of the estate of Henry Pickett, deceased; total value 200:19:08; returned by William Johnson and Elizabeth, his wife, and John Pickett. Dated January 11, 1702/3. [49]

1701 Henry Pickett's will, dated 10/18/1701, was recorded in Essex County, Virginia and mentioned that wife Elizabeth was pregnant. [50] [51] The child was named James and he died before August 10, 1702 in Essex County, Virginia.

1702 Elizabeth, widow of Henry Pickett, married William Johnson, possibly one of the witnesses to Henry Pickett's will and a landowner of land adjoining that of Henry Pickett. [52] [53]

1704 Thomas Spencer and Hannah, his wife, James Fullerton and Sarah, his wife, petition court for administration of the estate of James Pickett late of Essex county, deceased, as being nearest of kin; but it being signified that the mother of the deceased is alive, refer to consideration by the next court. Dated February 11, 1703/04, [54] [55]

1704 The administration of the estate of James Pickett, deceased, was granted to William Johnson and Elizabeth, his wife, nearest of kin of the deceased. Dated March 10, 1703/04. [56] [57] James was the unborn child mentioned in the will of Henry Pickett. Elizabeth Johnson, remarried, was the mother and had been Henry Pickett's widow.

1713 Land of Henry Pickett, deceased, and of (son) John Picket was mentioned for a land transaction in Essex County, near Piscataway Creek. [58]

Research Notes:

Many of the court and deed records for Henry Pickett cited above have been indexed by FamilySearch. The index entries do not appear to correspond to the books filmed by FamilySearch. We seek help finding the original documents. [59] [60]

The ancestry for Henry is not known. William Pickett and Ann Sanford (born 1630, incompatible with Henry's birthdate), of England, have been suggested as his parents. William Pickett and Sarah Stone have been suggested as his grand-parents. The spelling of the name may have been originally French-Picquett, then in England became Picot, then came to America and became Piggott, Pickett, Pickette. The original name was used as late as 1681. Henry has been listed as born about 1636 in Middlesex County, Virginia or as born 1641 in Lancaster, England.

Bill Putman listed several Piggot families in Virginia [61]:

In the early records of Passengers to Virginia, I find that a William Piggott, age 50, sailed from
London on May 15th, 1635 on the sailing ship Plain Joan. William Piggott married Ann
Langford, the daughter of James Langford.

A Walter Piggott, age 19, sailed from London on October 24th, 1635 on board the ship Abraham.
One must keep in mind that in those days, Virginia included everything south from the
Massachusetts and New Haven Colonies, so they could have landed anywhere from Jamestown
to Philadelphia.

There was a Henry Pickett or Piggott who had a wife named Sarah and a son John born about
1640 in Essex County Virginia.

There was a James Pigot who signed a petition in Virginia in 1676.

There was a Captain Francis Pigott who came to the eastern shore of Virginia from England in
the late 1600s. His will was filed in Northampton County Virginia.

There was a Captain Ralph Pigot who married Mary Bullock in Northampton County Virginia on
October 21, 1724.

In the list of Virginia taxpayers from 1782 to 1787, there were three Piggott families living in
James City County of Virginia.

There was a John Piggot who married Peggy Nottingham in Northampton County Virginia on
September 17, 1787.

1609 Captain Pigot signed the second charter for the Virginia Corporation and first Colony of Virginia. [62]

See also [63] [64] [65]


Footnotes:

[1] John Senex, A new map of Virginia, Mary-Land, and the improved parts of Pennsylvania & New Jersey, Piscatawa Creek is in the lower right, [LibraryOfCongress], [LibraryOfCongressCatalog].

[2] Henry Faithorne, Virginia and Maryland as it is planted and inhabited this present year 1670, [LibraryOfCongress], [LibraryOfCongressCatalog].

[3] C. G. Chamberlin (ed.), The Vestry Book of Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, Virginia (Old Dominion Press, 1927), 4, [FHLBook].

[4] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 80, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[5] Scott S. Strickland, Julia A. King, G. Anne Richardson, Martha McCartney, and Virginia Busby, Defining the Rappahannock Indigenous Cultural Landscape, (2016), 31-32, [Chesapeake Conservancy Organization].

[6] Research Note (citation not recorded): Essex County, Virginia, Court Order Book 1692-95, p. 8.

[7] Patricia Finn Hunter, Pickett Cousins, a 350 year history 1640-1990 (self-published, 1991), 1, [GoogleBooks].

[8] John Senex, A new map of Virginia, Mary-Land, and the improved parts of Pennsylvania & New Jersey, Piscatawa Creek is in the lower right, [LibraryOfCongress], [LibraryOfCongressCatalog].

[9] Henry Faithorne, Virginia and Maryland as it is planted and inhabited this present year 1670, [LibraryOfCongress], [LibraryOfCongressCatalog].

[10] Old Rappahannock County Record, Vol 1671-b, p. 178.

[11] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 80, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[12] Old Rappahannock County Record, Vol 1677-82, p. 241.

[13] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 80, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[14] Old Rappahannock County Record, Vol 1677-82, p. 294.

[15] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 80, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[16] Old Rappahannock County Record, Vol 1686-92, p. 27.

[17] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 81, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[18] Old Rappahannock County Record, Vol 1686-92, p. 91,96.

[19] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 81, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[20] Research Note (citation not recorded): Essex County, Virginia, Records, Vol 1692-95, p. 3.

[21] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 81, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[22] Patricia Finn Hunter, Pickett Cousins, a 350 year history 1640-1990 (self-published, 1991), 1, [GoogleBooks].

[23] Lothrop Withington, "Virginia Gleanings in England," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 11 (1903-4), 305-306, at 306, [HathiTrust].

[24] Patricia Finn Hunter, Pickett Cousins, a 350 year history 1640-1990 (self-published, 1991), 1, [GoogleBooks].

[25] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 81, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[26] Research Note (citation not recorded): Essex County, Virginia, Records, 1695-99 page 93, deed 9-94.

[27] Virginia Lee Hutcheson Davis, Tidewater Virginia Families (1989), 341.

[28] Research Note (citation not recorded): Essex County, Virginia, Records, Vol 1695-99, p. 48.

[29] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 81, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[30] Research Note (citation not recorded): Essex County, Virginia, Records, Vol 1695-99, Deed 9-294.

[31] Essex County, Virginia Deeds, 29-60, [FamilySearch Image], [FSCatalog].

[32] Mary Marshall Brewer, Essex County, Virginia, Land Records, 1761 - 1772 (2006), 10, citing Essex county deed book 29-60.

[33] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 186, citing Virginia deed 29-60, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[34] Research Note (citation not recorded): Essex County, Virginia, Records, Vol 1695-99, p. 138.

[35] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 81, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[36] Patricia Finn Hunter, Pickett Cousins, a 350 year history 1640-1990 (self-published, 1991), 2, [GoogleBooks].

[37] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 82, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[38] Research Note (citation not recorded): Essex County, Virginia, Orders, Vol 1699, p. 17.

[39] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 82, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[40] Research Note (citation not recorded): Essex County, Virginia, Deeds & Wills, Vol 1699-1702, p. 74.

[41] Virginia Land Office Patents and Grants, Land Grant Abstracts, Library of Virginia, 9-110, bottom of page, [Library of Virginia].

[42] Virginia Land Office Patents and Grants, Land Grant Abstracts, Library of Virginia, 9-377 to 378, [Library of Virginia].

[43] Patricia Finn Hunter, Pickett Cousins, a 350 year history 1640-1990 (self-published, 1991), 2, [GoogleBooks].

[44] Nell Marion Nugent, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, Vol, 3, 1695-1732 (1983), 49.

[45] Rosemary B. Hill and Dixie J. Clark, A Gathering of Picketts, Vol. 1 Virginia & Kentucky (self-published, 1998), 20, [GoogleBooks].

[46] Essex County, Library of Virginia Microfilm, reel 3, Deeds and Wills, No. 10, 1699-1702, p 117a, Will probate 10 Aug. 1702, [Library_Virginia].

[47] Essex County, Library of Virginia Microfilm, reel 3, Deeds and Wills, No. 10, 1699-1702, p 121, Exors. bond rec. 10 Nov. 1702, [Library_Virginia].

[48] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 82, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[49] Essex County, Library of Virginia Microfilm, reel 3, Deeds and Wills, No. 10, 1699-1702, p 127-8, 133a, Inv. & appr. rec. 11 Jan. 1702, [Library_Virginia].

[50] Essex County, Library of Virginia Microfilm, reel 3, Deeds and Wills, No. 10, 1699-1702, p 117, [Library_Virginia].

[51] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 82, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[52] Essex County, Library of Virginia Microfilm, reel 3, Deeds and Wills, No. 10, 1699-1702, p 127, [Library_Virginia].

[53] Eva Eubank Wilkerson, Index to Marriages of Old Rappahannock and Essex Counties, Virginia, 1655-1900 (Clearfield, 1953), 145, [GoogleBooks].

[54] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 83, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[55] Research Note (citation not recorded): Essex County, Virginia, Order Book 1703-08, p 48.

[56] Clayton Torrence, "Pickett Family of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 49 (1941), 80-86, 186-190, at 83, [JSTOR(UM)], [JSTOR(UM)].

[57] Research Note (citation not recorded): Essex County, Virginia, Order Book 1703-08, p 56,57,67,73,92.

[58] Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1961), 25, [GoogleBooks].

[59] Index entries for Henry Pickett, [URL].

[60] Catalog entry for Essex and old Rappahannock counties, [URL].

[61] Bill Putman, The Piggott Family (2013), [URL].

[62] Philip Alexander Bruce, Lyon Gardiner Tyler, Richard Lee Morton, History of Virginia, Vol. 2 (American Historical Society, 1924), 400, [InternetArchive].

[63] Rosemary B. Hill and Dixie J. Clark, A Gathering of Picketts, Vol. 1 Virginia & Kentucky (self-published, 1998), 1-23, [GoogleBooks].

[64] John P. Alcock, Fauquier Families, 1759-1799 (Athens, Georgia: Iberian Publishing Co, 1994), 414, [GoogleBooks].

[65] Patricia Finn Hunter, Pickett Cousins, a 350 year history 1640-1990 (self-published, 1991), 1, of vii, 1-2, [GoogleBooks].