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Notes for Thomas Stevenson

1642 Willem Barents of Westchester and Maria Bullock, widow [who subsequently married Thomas Stevenson], were married on June 1. [1] [2]

Thomas Stevenson was the father of Abigail Stevenson, who was born before 1645, so Thomas must have had a wife before he married Maria Bernard in 1645.

1643 Thomas Stephenson was of Yennycott (Southold). He had sold a boat in Virginia. [3] [4]

1643 Twins Marie and Elizabeth, daughters of Marie Barnarts [no husband was named, perhaps he had died], were baptized on October 11 at the Dutch Reformed Church in New York. Thomas Hall and Engeltje Borgers were named, perhaps as sponsors. [5]

1644 Thomas Stephenson appeared on the list of original proprietors of Hempstead, Long Island when the first division of land occurred [6].

1645 Thomas Stevenson lived in Southold, [eastern end of] Long Island. [7]

1645 Thomas Stevenson and Maria Bernard, widow of William Bernard, of Westchester county, New York were married on August 15. "15 Aug; Thomas Stephenszen, jm van London; Maria Bernards, wid Willem Bernards" [8] [9]

1647 Thomas Stephenson lived in New Amsterdam; when an Indian deed confirmed the purchase of the land of Hempstead, Long Island, from the Indians. [10]

1650 Thomas Stevenson and others of Hempstead signed a petition against the Schout (sheriff) of Flushing. [11]

Title
1650 Signature of Thomas Stevenson

c 1651 Thomas Stevenson, an englishman living at Flushing, moved to the farm on Flushing Bay as a tenant for Adrian Van der Donck; but after the departure of Van der Donck to Holland, Stevenson got a patent from Stuyvesant confirming these premises to himself. The tract was known as Stevens' point and as Yonker's Island. [12]

1652 Thomas Stevenson lived in Brooklyn, where he and Thomas Hall were appointed, in 1652, by the Director General, arbitrators in a land suit between two Hollanders.

1652 Nov. 18. Court proceedings. Thomas Stevenson vs. Harry Bresier; plaintiff rented a farm from defendant, who was to build a house on the premises, whilst plaintiff was to build a tobacco house which he was to leave on the ground, in return defendant was to furnish the nails and half a barrel of beer; plaintiff sues on the contract; the farm having meanwhile been sold to Cornells de Potter, the case is taken under deliberation; various actions for debt. [13]

Nov. 25. Court proceedings. Thomas Stevenson vs. Cornells de Potter, action to oblige defendant to repair plaintiff''s house which is falling down; defendant agrees to repair it. [14]

1655 "In 1655 [Newtown marshal] Mr. Bayley was directed by the magistrates to execute a certain judgement against Thomas Stevenson. The marshal seized upon one of his yoke cattle, and deaf to the entreaties of Stevenson, who tendered him part of the money, the balance of which Mr. Coe, the magistrate, on being appealed by Stevenson, kindly offered to advance, he proceeded to kill the ox. Mr. Stevenson made complaint to the Council, which decided May 8th, 1657, that Bayley should make reparation; declaring it 'contrary to divine and human laws' to deprive a man of his work-ox." [15]

c 1656 Thomas Stevenson and others helped build a house for a minister in Newtown. [16]

1656 Thomas Stevenson and Widow Stevens were listed as residents of Middleburg [Newtown], Long Island. [17]

1656 There was "a dispute between Thomas Stevenson and the magistrates of Newtown about the opening of a road and the fencing in of some meadow land. The difference having been referred to arbitrators, they made a report to Stuyvesant, the Dutch Governor, on September 22, 1656, and say in regard to the fourth and last complaint, The magistrates at New Middleburgh, [Newtown], complained that the said Stevenson has, against the general rule of the said village, fenced in all his meadow with an enclosure which they maintained should have been divided into three equal parts, of which one was to remain in his possession, while the two others were to be used by the community generally, and he should recceive for the two, equally large shares in the large meadows. Then Stevenson answered that he owned and claimed the said meadow by virtue of his patent, which being produced, it was found that the Honorable Director General of the New Netherlands had granted it to the said Stevenson in question, containing 20 morgans. The said magistrates replied that Stevenson had obtained the said patent by trickery, as he had not stated that the meadow belonged to Middleburgh territory, which seems reasonable as the Director General had promised that no patents should predjudice their rules, and as we could find no decision on the controversy we were inclined to submit to his honor, the Directer General, as being the best exponent of his promises. The Director General decided "On the 4th and last it is understood that the above mentioned patent has been obtained by misrepresentation and false report; that the proper intentions and promise of the Director General in every respect was and shall remain in force to the effect that no private property shall predjudice a village community; it is further notoriously evident that a mistake has been made either by the clerk or the surveyor in measuring or reporting the same and bounderies of meadow land, and that further dispute may result therefrom. The Director General and the Council order that the patent of Thomas Stevenson shall be amended, but so that in place of a third part of the meadow allowed by the magistrates to him as to others, he shall keep one half of it near his fields, because he has been hitherto the oldest and first owner of it, and in regard to the other half it shall be considered in the allotment with the other inhabitants of Middleburgh." [18]

1657 May 8. Judgment in the case of Thomas Stevenson vs. Ellas Bailey, constable of Middelborgh, for the value of an ox seized by defendant on an execution and afterwards killed by him, notwithstanding plaintiff offered satisfaction; defendant to replace the ox and pay 100 guilders damages. [19] [20] [21]

1658 July 9. Order in a suit of Thomas Stevenson vs. Elias Bailey, constable of Middelborgh, L. I., for payment of a debt due by the town; plaintiff to apply to the town magistrates for payment. [22]

1658 July 9. Judgment in the case of Thomas Steyenson vs. John Gray and Samuel Sales, of Middelburgh, L. I., for trespass in cutting down his fence; defendants claim that it was across the public road; plaintiff ordered to leave the road as laid out by Messrs. La Montague and Willett, and both parties to pay £1 Flemish. [23] [24]

1658 Thomas Stevenson made a complaint against the magistrates of Middelborgh, L. I., for opening a new road through his land, and order thereupon. Dated August 30. See the complaint dated 1655. [25]

1662 The widow of Edward Stevenson and other inhabitants of Middleborrow and Mespath Kil, signed an agreement that they would not sell goods without paying the rent to the Dutch director-general. Dated July 3. Thomas Stevenson was not listed. [26] [27] [28]

We have assumed that these documents regarding the estate of Thomas Stevenson refer to Thomas, born about 1615 in England.

1668 On 7 July, A Certificate of Administration was granted to Robert Coe and Daniel Denton of the estate of Thomas Stevenson, deceased. Robert Coe and Daniel Denton, both of Jamaica in the North Riding of Yorkshire upon Long Island, having been heretofore overseers and Guardians of the children & estate of Thomas Stevenson of New Towne deceased had at the last Court of Sessions held at Jamaica aforesaid Ltrs of Administration granted unto them of the estate of the said Thomas Stavenson for the use? of his ? children and the said Robert Coe & Daniel Denton having given security to that Cost? to be answerable & accountable for the said estate together with the issues & increase thereof to the said children As also furth'e to do & perform what in such cases by ye lawe is required These are to certify that the said Robert Coe & Daniel Denton are hereby admitted & confirmed to all intents & purposes adm'es of the whole estate of what nature or kinde sooner heretofore belonging or in any way apperteyning to the said Tho: Stevenson togeth'er w'th the increase or product thereof And the said Robert Coe & Daniel Denton have hereby full power of lawful authority to enter into possession of the premises as also so demanded and for ? & ? all or any parte of the said estate wheth'er within this Governm't or old England or otherwise dispose thereof as Adm' by ye lawes of this Governm't or the laws of England have allowed to do given und'er my hand & seale at Fort James in New York this 7th of July 1668. Rich. Nicolls. [29]

1668 "Robert Coe and Daniel Denton, of Jamaica, Long Island, are appointed Administrators of the estate of Thomas Stevenson, and guardians of his children. July 9, 1668. Ri. Nicolls." [30] [31]

1668 Robert Coe resigns his appointment as Administrator of estate of Thomas Stevenson July 9, 1668, and Anthony Waters, of Jamaica, is appointed in his place. August 15, 1668. [32] [33]

A Resignem' from Robt Coe to Danell Denton of his Trust as Adm' to Tho: Stevenson dec'd

Whereas I am admitted by the Governs' to be Joint Adm' of the Estate of Thomas Stevens dec'd w'th Dannell Denton in Trust for the use of the children & heires of the said Thomas Stevenson I doe hereby resign all my trust as to what doth or may relate to any estate belonging to the said Thomas Stevenson or his heires in London or in any parte of Engl unto the said Danell Denton In Testimony whereof I have hereunto sett my hand this 9th day of July 1668. Robert Coe. Acknowledged before me M Nicholls, (?)

Certificate of Administration granted unto Mr Anthony Waters of the estate of Mr. Thomas Stevenson dc'd.

Whereas Thomas Stevenson late of Jamaica in the North Riding of Yorkshire upon Long Island dyed intestate & Anthony Waters of the same place having re'th the approbacon & consent of the nearest relacon of the p'erson deceased requested Ltrs of Admin of his goods Chattles & estate These are to certify that the said Anthony Waters is Admitted & confirmed to all intents & purposes Administrator of the whole estate togeth'er w'th the goods & chattles of what nature sooner heretofore belonging or in any wise apportayning to the aforesaid Thomas Stevenson deceased and the said Anthony Waters hath hereby full power & lawful authority to enter into posession of the premises … Under my hand & seale at Port James in New York this 15th day of Aug: 1668. R Nicolls.

The notes below, for Thomas Stevenson, likely refer to either Thomas (of Southampton, perhaps a son of Thomas), or Thomas (of Newton, perhaps a son of Edward).

These documents regard Thomas Stevens, of Southampton, Long Island, son of Thomas Stevenson of Newton.

1663 On March 14, son Thomas Stevenson, chose a guardian at Southampton, Long Island: "Thomas Steevens[on] aged about 16 yeares, his parents being deceased, and something being left unto him by them, hee the said Thomas doth make choice of his loving friend John Cooper to bee his guardian." [34]

1663 On September 5, the will of Ellis Cook in Southampton, included a bequest "unto my servant Thomas Stevens one heifer of about one yeare old to bee delivered unto him at the expiration of his apprentisship, provided hee carry himselfe as hee ought in his place dureing his time of service." The will indicated that Ellis Cook's wife Martha was a sister of John Cooper [chosen as guardian of Thomas Stevenson in 1663]. [35]

1666 On May 30, [son] Thomas Stevens of Southampton [Abigail Stevenson's brother] sold to Daniel Whitehead Jr, of Mashpeage Kells, lands, houses, and upland, that formerly belonged to his father Thomas Stevens[on]. The land was in Mashpeage Kell, between land belonging to Loras Peterson and Peter Forman. Daniel Whitehead Jr sold the land to Loras Peterson on 20 April 1667, at which time it was bounded on the north by land of Thomas Stevens [perhaps a son of Edward Stevenson]. [36]

1666 A list of Rates [for Newtown] named Daniel Whitehead, Jo. Stevenson and George Stevenson as the only citizens of those names in the town. [37]

1667 A list of Rates made by the Constable and Overseers of Newtown named Wil. Graves, Da. Whithead, and Geo. Stevenson as the only citizens of those names in the town. [38]

1670 Widow Anne Stevenson had married William Graves, of Newtown. On December 31, Ann Graves wrote an unproved will naming "my [step] daughters Abigail Denton and Elizabeth Everett", "my son Jonathan Stevenson", and "my cousin Thomas Stevenson." [39] [40] [41] This suggests that Ann Graves was the widow of Stevenson. "The last will and testament of Anne Graves, the wife of William Graves, now inhabitant of Newtown, on Long Iland, in the county of Yorkshire this 31 December: 1670." Leaves to daughter, Elizabeth Everit, a feather bed, warming pan, iron spit, a fire shovel, pair of tongs, and a trunk. I leave all the rest of my estate to my daughters, Elizabeth Everitt and Abigail Denton, "and my clothes as they were prized by Mr. John Coe and Mr. Jonathan Fish." I leave to my cousin, Thomas Stevenson, my Bible. Witnesses, Abraham Frost, John Pettit. (Not recorded.) Endorsed, Not allowed." [42] [43] [44] This suggests that Ann Graves was the widow of Stevenson and that Jonathan Stevenson, Elizabeth Everitt and Abigail Denton were children.

1672? Thomas Stevenson sold land formerly belonging to Edward Stevenson, bounded by Ralph Hunt, Flushing Creek, and Thomas Robinson. [between two deeds dated 1673 and 1670] [45]

1674 Ralph Hunt and Jeremiah Reder were granted land betweeen Thomas Stevenson and Thomas Robinson. [46]

1685 On 20 October, Thomas Stevenson was commissioned as a justice of the peace for Queens County, Long Island, New York. [47]

1686 On 25 November, Thomas Dongan governor of New York, confirmed the original patent granted to Newtown in 1666. Patentees included Thomas, Edward, Jonathan, and Joris Stevenson. [48] [49]

Research Notes:

Several researchers have attempted to deduce the relationships among Thomas and Edward Stevenson, who had both died in Newtown by 1663, and the several children listed above. Much is uncertain, so the statements quoted below should not be assumed to be accurate.

"Thomas Stevenson, the founder of this family, was born in London, England, in 1615, and died in Newtown, Long Island, shortly before July 7, 1668. He was the descendant of a family whose ancestor, for services rendered to William the Conqueror at the battle of Hastings, was rewarded by a grant of land in Scotland, south of Glasgow, where the present town of Steventon now is. Thomas Stevenson landed in Virginia about 1643, and removed shortly afterwards to Long Island, where he served under Captain John Underhill against the Indians. He then settled in Southold. Long Island, with the colony from Connecticut, brought thither by Captain Underhill and later removed to Newtown. He married, August 15, 1645. Maria (Bullock) Bernard, widow of William Bernard, of Westchester county, New York. Children: John, died about 1670, unmarried: Thomas, referred to below; Edward, born about 1650, died September 12, 1700, married Charity Field: Sarah, married Patrick Hires, or Harris." [50]

"Thomas Stevenson came from London, England, and probably landed in Virginia about 1643. He brought a suit on 5 February 1645 in the New Haven Court, by attachment against the goods of Mr. Lewis of London, in the hands of William Andrews. Mr. Priden appeared as Stevenson's attorney. Stevenson had sold and delivered to Mr. Lewis "a boat at Virginia, valued at £8", who had agreed to give him for it a mare of his then in the hands of Mr. Russell of Charlestown, Massachusetts. The mare was demanded of Russell, who said he had sold her for £4." [51]

Several additions and corrections have been reported for the Stevenson Genealogy (1902). [52]

1633 Thomas Stevenson (erased) was a freeholder of Hope, Derbyshire, England. [53]

Thomas Stevenson married Mary Bernard, widow of William Bernard, and she was named as widow Bullock on the Dutch records of the Reformed Dutch Church in New York. Names children 1) John, 2) Thomas, 13) Edward, and 18) Abigail. Daughter 19) Sarah is listed below Abigail without a roman numeral. [54]

Thomas Stevenson married widow Maria Barents (Bernard) in the Dutch Reformed Church, New Amsterdam. Her maiden name was Bullock.Their children were named as John, Thomas, Edward, and Sarah, who married Patrick Hires. The estate of Thomas Sr was settled on July 7, 1668 by Robert Coe and Daniel Denton (the first husband of Abigail Stevenson) who were named as guardians of the children. Oldest son John owned the estate by 1667, and was named as a freeholder in 1666. [55] [56]

Transcription of Harry Macy Jr (editor of The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record), "Two Stevens or Stevenson Families of Long Island," a two page essay, apparently unpublilshed, dated November, 2001 [57]:

The records of the Town of Newtown, Long Island, show that in the 1650's and 1660's there were two families living there by the name of Stevens or Stevenson. The heads of these two families were named Edward and Thomas.

Over a century ago John R. Stevenson compiled a genealogy of the Newtown Stevensons. His first version was published as a article in The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record in 1882, the second as another article in The Jerseyman in 1898, and the third and final version as a book, Thomas Stevenson of London, England, and His Descendants, in 1902.

In 1882, John R. Stevenson stated that Thomas Stevenson of Newtown was the father of John, Edward, Thomas, Sarah, and Abigail. In his second and third versions, he added a separate account of Edward and gave Abigail to him, plus a son Jonathan. This left Thomas with four children.

Many subsequent writers have copied John R. Stevenson, so his account of the genealogy appears in numerous places. However, a re-examination of the primary sources indicates that John R. Stevenson had the two families reversed, that John, Edward, and Thomas of Newtown, and their sister Sarah, were actually children of Edward, and Abigail and Jonathan were the children of Thomas. In addition, Thomas was the father of Elizabeth, and of Thomas of Southampton, L.I.

John R. Stevenson probably made this mistake because he did not have as complete access to the early records as we do today. What do these records tell us? First of all, there are two wills that define the two families. Both wills were made, by coincidence, in Newtown in December 1670. The first will is that of John Stevenson. He was unmarried, and left his estate (land in Newtown) to his sister Sarah (wife of Patrick Haire), brother Edward, and brother Thomas. The second will was that of Anne Graves, wife of William Graves, who left her estate to her daughters Abigail Denton and Elizabeth Everitt and her son Jonathan Stevenson, and also left her bible to her "cousin" Thomas Stevenson.

The next key piece of evidence is court testimony by Abigail Whitehead at Newtown in 1684. She is the Abigail Denton named in Anne Graves will, as she was married first to Daniel Denton. Her divorce from Denton and subsequent marriage to Daniel Whitehead are well documented. In 1684 Edward was attempting to prove that his name was Stevenson, even though he was sometimes called Stevens. In the early Newtown records members of the family were recorded both ways, sometimes even in the same document, and in 1684 this apparently raised a question about their title to property. In any case, Abigail testified "that shee was Ever Informed from her parence that there names ware Stevenson." She noted that she "had a letter came from my mother['s] sister & ther I saw ther names Ritt Stevenson." From the two 1670 wills it is evident that Edward and Abigail were not brother and sister, but the fact that she gave this testimony suggests that they were recognized as members of the same family. In all probability, they were first cousins. Given their similar history, Edward and Thomas Stevenson could easily have been brothers, even though the records never call them such.

How do we know which family was Edward's and which was Thomas's? First, in 1672 Thomas of Newtown sold some meadow there which was "formerly Edward Stevenson's." Thomas's brother Edward was then still under age and there is no evidence or reason to believe that he had sold this meadow to his brother. It is much more likely that Thomas inherited this from his father, or it was the meadow his brother John inherited and then left to Thomas. In any event, this suggests that their father was Edward.

A second piece of evidence ties Abigail to Thomas. In 1668 Robert Coe and Daniel Denton, who had been acting as overseers and guardians of the children of Thomas Stevenson of Newtown, deceased, were named administrators of his estate. As already mentioned, Denton was then married to Abigail Stevenson. That he [Denton] was named to these positions suggests that Abigail's mother Anne Graves was the widow of Thomas, not Edward. (Note that the documents relating to the settlement of Thomas's estate never name his wife or children; otherwise we would have no problem identifying them. Also, there are no documents at all regarding the settlement of Edward's estate.)

The evidence that solves this mystery, however, is found in two records pertaining to Thomas Stevens of Newtown and Southampton. The records of Southampton show that in March 1663/4 "Thomas Steevens aged about 16 years, his parents being deceased, and something being left unto him by them," chose John Cooper of Southampton to be his guardian (to handle his inheritance). In the records of Newtown, May 1666, we find that "Thomas Stevens of Southampton" sold to Daniel Whitehead Jr. of Mashpeage Kills (Maspeth Kills, in Newtown) "the hom[e] lott … that formerly appertained to my father Thomas Stevens deceased." To execute this deed he should have been 21, placing his birth about 1645, while the 1663 records indicates that he was born 1646 or 1647. (Daniel Whitehead Jr. would later marry Abigail Stevenson.)

These crucial records were unknown to John R. Stevenson, and he thus made no mention of this Thomas in his genealogy. However, there can be no question that Thomas Stevenson of Southampton, founder of the Stevens (or Stephens) family of that town, was originally from Newtown and was the son of Thomas Stevens. That he ended up in Southampton, some 80 east of Newtown, suggests a family connection to that town. The earliest mention of Edward is at Southampton in 1640 and Thomas was at nearby Southold in 1645 and possibly earlier, but whether they were related to someone at Southampton remains to be discovered.

The Thomas Stevens of Newtown who was the father to Thomas Stevens of Southampton has to be the Newtown settler also know as Thomas Stevenson. It is quite clear from the Newtown records that the man variously recorded there as Thomas Stevens and Thomas Stevenson was one and the same person. If this is so, then the other Thomas Stevenson, who remains in Newtown, cannot have been the son of Thomas as claimed by John R. Stevenson, and has to have been the son of Edward. This other Thomas was born abour 1647-8 according to his own testimony in the Newtown court, so he and his cousin Thomas of Southampton were almost the same age.

In her will Anne Graves leaves her bible to her "cousin" Thomas Stevenson. In 1670 the word cousin could have today's meaning, but it was most often used to mean nephew (or niece) and sometimes was used for other relationships. It is possible that Anne was using the term in this case to mean stepson, and was leaving her bible to Thomas of Southampton. It is also possible that she was referring to her late husband's nephew, Thomas of Newtown, son of Edward.

Henry B. Hoff and Harry Macy published an article in 1996 titled "Thomas Stephens of Southampton", in which they state, without evidence (as though it was a well-known fact), that the Stevenson genealogy of 1902 had reversed the children of Thomas and Edward Stevenson. The Macy essay quoted above was dated in 2001, perhaps intended to justify their statement in the 1996 article. Excerpts from the 1996 article are given below, excluding the many footnotes provided in the article:

At "Southampton March 14 1663 [1663/64]. Thomas Steevens aged about 16 yeares, his parents being deceased, and something being left by them, hee the said Thomas doth this day before the Authority of this towne make choice of his loving friend John Cooper to bee his guardian." …
In the period immediately prior to 1663, no couple with the surname Stevens or Stephens appears in the records of eastern Long Island. As a result, the identity of Thomas Stephens of Southampton remained unknown until the following deed was noted in the town minutes of Newtown, at the opposite end of Long Island: "May the 30: 1666 Know all men by these presents that I Thomas Stevens of Southampton for and in consideratsion of valuell satisfaction by me in hand received do … sell … unto Daniel Whitehead junior of Mashpeage Kills … the hom lott … that formerly appertained to my father Thomas Stevenson deceased …"

To execute this deed on his own, Thomas presumably would have been at least 21, which would place his birth prior to June 1645, whereas the 1663/64 record quoted above places his birth around 1647 ir 1648. It is possible that with both parents dead, his precise age was not known.

Thomas Stephens of Southampton was thus the son of another man of the same name who owned land in Newtown prior to 1663. This earlier Thomas Stephens was almost certainly identical with Thomas Stevens or Stevenson who lived at Maspeth in Newtown from 1651 or 1652 until his death, which might have been as late as 1662. His probate makes it clear he was from London and that he left children, at least one of whom was a minor for whom guardians were appointed.

Thomas Stevenson (as he was usually referred to) appears to have married three times. The Stevenson genealogy [58] provides a good account of his life at pp. 8-13, but shows him with only one wife and reverses his children with those of Edward Stevenson of Newtown (probably his brother) at pp. 14-22, 131-133. His first wife, whose name is unknown, evidently was the mother of his daughter Abigail (born before 1645) and perhaps of his daughter Elizabeth, too. He married second at the New York Dutch Church on or after 15 August 1645 Maria Bernards, widow. The marriage record says he was a bachelor, from London, but marital status is not always correctly given in these records. The maiden name of Maria Bernard is unknown; her previous marriage at the same church was as Maria Bullock, widow, to William Barents. Thomas and Maria (---)(Bullock)(Barents) Stevenson were evidently the parents of Thomas Stephens of Southampton.

Thomas Stevenson marrried third Anne ---, who survived him. Anne subsequently married William Graves of Newtown, and she left an unproven will there dated 31 December 1670. The will mentions "my daughters Abigail Denton and Elizabeth Everett," "my son Jonathan Stevenson," and "my cousin Thomas Stevenson." The daughters were evidently her stepdaughters, but Jonathan was perhaps her own son. Cousin Thomas Stevenson (who was to receive a bible) very likely was Thomas Stevenson's oldest surviving nephew, also of Newtown.

Thomas Stephens of Southampton is not mentioned in this will nor in any Newtown record other than the one 1666 deed cited above. His orderly first appearance in the Soughampton records and his subsequent sale of property in Newtown suggest that he didn't just run away from home. Perhaps Anthony Waters, one of the guardians of Thomas Stevenson's children, had arranged for him to live in Southampton. Waters had previously lived in Southampton, and Thomas Stevenson himself had been in Southold in early 1645.

The Stevenson genealogy and other acounts of the family in Newtown have ignored Thomas Stephens of Southampton, probably because neither he nor his descendants were mentioned in the will of Anne Graves (see above). A full analysis of the Stevenson family of Newtown has not been given here, and the family structure presented here might not be the final word on the subject. …

Conflict with Macy essay? We show Thomas, spouse of Elizabeth Lawrence, as a son of Edward, following the Macy essay above. However, a Quaker record reports [59]:
Stevenson:
Thomas, Sr., s Thomas, Newtown, d 2 Mo (Apr) 6, 1725; m Elizabeth Lawrence (children are named). Thomas active mbr from 1696.
Thomas, Sr., Newtown, m 2nd Ann. Thomas took cert of clear to West Jersey 12 mo 7 1705.
The conflict is that the conclusions of Macy imply that Thomas, spouse of Elizabeth Lawrence, was a son of Edward, rather than of Thomas while the Quaker record might indicate that he was a son of Thomas. The Quaker Encyclopedia is generally accureate but several errors have been reported. Where is the source for these Quaker records? I have not yet found them in the NYGBR abstractions of Quaker Records from New York City and vicinity beginning in volume 3 [60] and 4 [61] [62] [63]

Not a conflict? The Stevenson genealogy [64] cites a 1662 document naming "the widow of Edward Stevenson" as a citizen of Newtown who signed an agreement to pay rent to the Dutch Director-General. The Stevenson genealogy suggests that the widow of Edward Stevenson was later Ann Graves, spouse of William Graves. Macy suggests that the widow of Thomas Stevenson (rather than of Edward Stevenson) married William Graves. The tax document only shows that Edward Stevenson had died by 1662 and offers no evidence that Edward's widow later married William Graves. The tax document contributes no evidence about whose widow William Graves later married. We have found three listings for Newtown naming Widow Steven[son]:

1656 Thomas Stevenson and Widow Stevens were listed as residents of Middleburg [Newtown], Long Island. [65]
1662 Another Rate list for Newtown, dated March 16, 1662 named "Wido Stevens". [66]
1662 The widow of Edward Stevenson and other inhabitants of Middleborrow and Mespath Kil, signed an agreement that they would not sell goods without paying the rent to the Dutch director-general. Dated July 3. Thomas Stevenson was not listed. [67] [68] [69]

Lovinge Friends

Whereas the tyme off ten yeares, and alsoo the freedom of tenths is expeyrcd, these presents doe Order, the Magistrates & also all the Inhabitants oft the towne of Middelborrow & all the other Plantations in Mespatli I'd that none of them shal presume, or vndertake to Remove their fruits or increase, as Come, Mais, Tobacco etc before they have agreed for this yeare about the tythes, with the Governour General it Council or their Commissioners vppon forfeiture oft fifty guilders. Actum Fort Amsterdam in -V. Nederlt adij 3 July 1G62.

To-day his Honor, the Director-General, on the one side, and the Magistrates of the village of Middelburgh, on the other side, agreed, that the said village should pay as tenths for this year and bring to the edge of the water near the house of Thomas Wandell, eighteen schepels, one half of wheat, the other of peas and it is further provisionally agreed, that the belownamed persons and plantations shall be under the jurisdiction of 21iddrfburgh. These persons are hereby ordered, to submit to the taxation for tenths by the said Magistrates or to make a fair agreement with the same: Jan Schodder, Lawrens Mott, Joris Sergeant, Jan Den man, James Wey, Francois Douthy, William Blomvil, Francois Swyn, Samuel Too, the widow of Edward Stevenson, Thomas Hont, Raeff Hont for two lots, John Lynten, James Lawrensen, Thomas Riet, Jonathan Hazard, John Laurens, John Borres, Edward Joseph, Jan Ramsdain for two lots, Hendrick Jansen Smif, Thomas Robhersen, Jan Coo, James Krist two lots, Thomas Pettis senior, Nicolas Karter, Jan Forman, William Laurens, Jan Cockren, Thomas Laurens two lots, Richard Smit two lots, Richard Fydon, Jonathan Fyn, Elias Belly, Jan Roo, Thomas Wandell and Joost van der Linde, Nicolas Junige, John Hart, Samuel Too, Joris Jewel, Daniel East, Richard Bets, John Too, William Britten.

Fort Amsterdam in New Netherland, the 10th of July 1602.

Extract From A Letter Of Stuyvksant To The Directors: John Scott's Patent For Long

Island. Jult 15th 1662.

We seek further evidence about the families of Thomas and Edward Stevenson.


Footnotes:

[1] Robert C. Billard, Marriage Records of New Amsterdam & New York 1639-1801 (undated), n1, 11, [InternetArchive].

[2] Marriages from 1639 to 1801 in the Reformed Dutch Church, New Amsterdam, New York City Collections of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society 9 (1940, reprint of Vol. 1, 1890), 11, [HathiTrust].

[3] [URL].

[4] [URL].

[5] Thomas Grier Evans, "Baptisms from 1639 to 1730 in the Reformed Dutch Church, New York" Collections of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, Vol. 2 (1901), 16, [Long Island Genealogy].

[6] Charles Werner and Benjamin F. Thompson, History of Long Island, 3rd edition, Vol. 3 (1918), 109, [InternetArchive].

[7] Henry B. Hoff and Harry Macy Jr, "Thomas Stephens of Southampton," Suffolk County Historical Society Register (1996), 115-121, at 117.

[8] Robert C. Billard, Marriage Records of New Amsterdam & New York 1639-1801 (undated), n3, 13, [InternetArchive].

[9] Marriages from 1639 to 1801 in the Reformed Dutch Church, New Amsterdam, New York City Collections of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society 9 (1940, reprint of Vol. 1, 1890), 13, [HathiTrust].

[10] Peter Ross and William Smith Pelletreau, A History of Long Island, Vol. 2 (1905), 84, [GoogleBooks].

[11] New York State Archives, Digital Collections, Dutch colonial administrative correspondence, 1646-1664. Series A1810-78. Volume 11, document 19, page 1, [NY Archives].

[12] James Riker, The Annals of Newtown, in Queens County, New York (1852), 24, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[13] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 130, citing Vol VI, p 92-93, [InternetArchive].

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