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Notes for James Pickett

These research notes refer to James Pickett, son of Micajah Pickett and Kisanna Hinson. However, there may have been several men with this name whose notes might be conflated, below. These research notes include notes for James Pickett of Greenville County, South Carolina (1816-1845) and Fairfield County (starting in 1820). James Pickett of Greenville County sold some of his land in 1830, but was not listed on an 1825 map of Greenville County, so he may have moved before the 1830 sale and thus could be the same James Pickett living in Fairfield County as early as 1820. The notes also follow people (Austin Peay and Philemon Starke) named in a slave ownership case of 1829 in Fairfield County, South Carolina, because the case involves both James B Pickett (James Boulware/Beasley Pickett?) and Elijah Hinson (relative of Kizannah Hinson, wife of Micajah?). See also the will of Robert Hinson, [1] whose 1820 will names Austin F Peay and Elijah Henson. [Photocopy] Map: Locations of Pickett deeds in Greenville (A) and Fairfield (B) Districts, South Carolina.

1793 James Pickett was granted 986 acres of land in Edgefield County, South Carolina on Big Horse Creek, Waters of the Savannah River. [2]

1794 Micajah Pickett, of Greenville District, South Carolina, purchased land from William Cornelius. The land was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on the Chickero River. The land had been adjacent to lands of William Cornelius and Dennis Duff. Dated January 13. [3]

1810 Philemon Starke lived in Kershaw County, South Carolina (see 1829 entry below). [4]

1810 Austin F Peay lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina. He owned 65 slaves. [5]

1810 Zadock Perry lived in Lancaster County, South Carolina (see 1829 entry below). [6]

1810 James Pickett (age 26-44), perhaps this one, lived in Edgefield, South Carolina with a family and with female (age 45+), perhaps Kizanna. [7]

1811 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, perhaps the father or brother of James, purchased several tracts on Saluda River, Greenville, South Carolina. [8]

1811 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, purchased land from William Cornelius and wife Letitia Cornelius. The land was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on the Checaroah river waters of the Saluda River, adjoining land of Joseph Terry. Dated October 12. [9]

1811 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, purchased land from John Hightower. The land was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on both sides of the north fork of the Saluda River, adjoining land of Dennis Duff, William Cornelius, and John Hightower. Dated November 7. [10]

1812 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, purchased land from William Lynch. The land was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on the Saluda River, adjoining land of Wm Cornelius. Dated January 31. [11]

1812 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, purchased land from Andrew Walker and wife Elizabeth. The land was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on the Saluda River, adjoining land of Philip and Dennis Duff. Dated February 20. [12]

1812 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, purchased land from Andrew Walker and wife Elizabeth. The land was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on the Saluda River, adjoining land of Robert Cooke and William Cornelius and John Hightower. Dated January 31. [13]

1814 James Pickett sold land in Rutherford County, on Green River above the mouth of Alstons Creek, to Henry Dunham Sr. The land had been granted to Henry Dunham, originally, and was between lands of Micajah Pickett and Henry Dunham. Witnessed by Charles Pickett and Jonathan Whitesides. [14]

1814 James Pickett Jr, Charles Pickett, and Robert Cockran witnessed the will of Thomas Stark in Rutherford County, North Carolina. Dated October 4. [15]

1816 James Pickett purchased from Robert Cooke, both of Greenville District, land in Upper Greenville County, South Carolina and likely lived in the historic John Goodwin House, which is located there. [16] A deed dated 16 March describes 407 acres on E side of N fork of Saluda R, sometimes called Checheroa R, including the plantation where Robert Cooke lives. [17]

1818 James Pickett purchased land from Benjamin Mchaney, both of Greenville District, South Carolina. The 453 acre tract was on the waggon road leading from Greenville Courthouse to Ashville in North Carolina and on both sides of Wyers? Creek of Chicheroa River of Saluda River. The tract was bounded by lands of John Spriggs, William Lynch, Jesse Trammell, Burnell Russell, Micajah Pickett, and the said James Pickett. [18] [19]

Survey of James Pickett tract, showing the wagon road from Micajah Pickett's tract to North Carolina, perhaps the road that Isaiah Pickett used to elope with Nancy Cochran

1818 A land survey was made for James R Pickett of 197 acres on south side Disputation? branch waters of Catawba River, Fairfield District, South Carolina. Wm Saunders, Kishfather(?), Isaac Sibson, and Srledge(?) were shown as adjacent landowners on the survey map. [20]

1820 James R Pickett, perhaps a different James, age 26-45 lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina with 1 other male and 5 females and 19 slaves. Nearby listings included William Lewis, Jeremiah Gaither, Edmund Runalds, Thomas Jones, Joseph Strange. [21]

1820 John Pickett lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina in a houshold with two males age 26-45, perhaps himself and brother James. Nearby listings were for John Henson Jr, and for Rebecca Henson and several other neighbors of James B Pickett named in the 1830 census. [22]

1820 Elisha Hensen (age 16-26 or 45+) lived in Lancaster County, South Carolina. [23]

1820 Zadok (Ladock) Perry lived in Lancaster County, South Carolina. [24]

1820 Austie F Peay lived in Kershaw County, South Carolina; and 4 slaves. [25]
1820 Austin Peay lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina with 31 slaves. [26]

1821 James Pickett and others, including John Hightower and William Lynch Jr, signed a petition asking that the main road across Saluda Mountain to Greenville court house not be altered so as to pass through the plantations of the petitioners. [27] [28]

1823 William Pickett and Micajah Pickett Jr of Franklin County, Mississippi, gave power of attorney to James Pickett of Greenville District, "to receive, in South Carolina and North Carollina, all money due to us." Dated August 25. [29]

1824 James Pickett as postmaster for the United States post office established at Pickett's Valley in 1824. [30] [31] [32]

1825 Entries for I Pickett and M Pickett were shown on Mill's Atlas in the vicinity of the historic John Goodwin House. [33] [Photocopy] I Pickett and M Pickett: Part of Mills' 1825 Greenville Co, South Carolina atlas.

1826 "Know all men … I James Pickett, in consideration of $2067.40 due 1 day after date payable to Wm Choice, Comm. Equity of Greenville District, hath bargained … to Jeptha Pickett, Co-signer of Note of Security, his heirs … forever the following negro(es), to wit, Landen, Harriet, March, Mariah, Kezia and her 4 children, Romeo, Henry, John and Alsey, to have and … unto the sd Jeptha Pickett, his heirs … Also, I have signed a Bond with Jeptha Pickett, John B Pickett and Jesse ?Havis which the sd Jeptha gave to Wm Choice as Trustees of Kezannah Pickett for $12,120, (on) 20 Sept 1826. (date) 23 Jan 1828. (S) Jeptha Pickett and James Pickett. Witnesses: Tandy Walker, S Crayton, J H Goodlett, CCP and JQ." [34]

1826 "James Pickett holds my bond for $30,000. I, Wm H Salmon give as my Security to James Pickett, for $10,400 and interest in 10 equal annual installments of 1/10 part and annual interest on the whole, these slaves, to wit, Isaac about 28 yrs of age, Phillis about 30, Esther about 12, John about 8, Ben about 15, Shadrack about 16, Singleton about 13, Caty about 16, Daphny about 13 and Nanny, an old woman. 12 Feb 1726. (S) W H Salmon and Jas Pickett." [35] [36] William Salmon secured the loan with 3 tracts of land, including two which James Pickett had apparently owned previously. [37]

1827 William Salmon made several payments to James Pickett for various debts and transactions. [38]

1827 William Salmon sold 11 negroes to James Pickett for $4000, sale void if Salmon pays Pickett $4000 due by bond dated 13 February 1826. Dated March 15. [39]

1827 William Salmon returns all land to Pickett which he (Pickett) purchased from Robert Cooke & Benjamin Mehane. Dated March 15.[40]

1828 "Jeptha Pickett to James Pickett; today James Pickett is security for Jeptha Pickett in note dated today for $2,067.40 due tomorrow to William Choice, commissioner of Greenville Dist Equity Court; James also signed bond with Jeptha Pickett, John B Pickett, & Jesse Havis which Jeptha, as trustee of Kezannah Pickett, gave to William Choice, commissioner, for $12,120 with interest from Jan. 1, 1828 and dated Sept 20, 1826; to secure payment sold in trust 9 Negroes: Lauden, Harriet, March, Mariah, Kiziah, & her 4 children: Romeo, Henry, John, & Alacy; sale void if Jeptha Pickett pays both debt on time & makes account as trustee: otherwise James can sell the Negroes & use proceeds to pay debt; any overplus from sale goes to Jeptha. (signed) Jeptha Pickett & James Pickett, (witness) Tandy Wakjer & S Crayton; wit. oath Feb. 8, 1828 by Tandy Walker before Micajah Berry JQ; Apr 15 1828 recorded". Dated January 23. [41] Jeptha Pickett sold to James Pickett, both of Greenville District, aa85 acres on N fork of Saluda R; being all real estate Micajah Pickett sr owned at his death in said district; sold by me in three tracts. Recorded Feb 17, 1829. [42] [43]

1828 James Pickett, of Greenville District, South Carolina, purchased land, in Franklin County, Georgia, from James Harrison. Dated September 15. [44]

1828 Micajah Pickett Jr of Franklin County, Mississippi, residuary claimant on bond of Micajah Pickett to his wife Kissanah Pickett, wants to close the matter, so he agrees to payment of $1,500 to James Pickett for care of Kissanah. Dated September 8. [45] Rufus K Pickett and William Pickett, heirs to the estate of William Pickett sr deceased, late of Franklin County, Mississippi agreed to the same. [46]

1829 Elijah Hinson and wife Jane Caroline Starke (just married), daughter of Philemon Starke, versus James B Pickett contested the ownership of several slaves. The slaves were bequeathed by James Perry to Philemon Starke and wife Margaret (Peggy), daughter of James Perry, who had children Baldy Starke and Jane Caroline (later married to Elijah Hinson). Philemon died and Margaret inherited the slaves. Margaret's slaves were seized in 1823 due to a debt to Austin F Peay and sold to Colonel Peay. On 1824, Mr Peay sold the slaves to Baldy Starke. In 1824, Baldy Starke sold the slaves to James B Pickett, although Baldy continued to rent the slaves from James B Pickett. Baldy died in 1829 without having paid for the slaves and John J Myers administered Baldy's estate. In January 1829, Jane Caroline married Elijah Hinson, who later administered the estate of Philemon Starke. James B Pickett had a bill of sale for the slaves in 1829 and sold them to James A Knighton, who carried them out of state, although the sale was deemed to be a pretence to avoid the claims of Hinson. Margaret Starke conveyed her interest in the slaves, if any, to (daughter) Mrs Hinson in 1830. [47] [48]

1830 James Pickett sold both tracts of land in Greenville County, South Carolina, purchased in 1816 and 1818, to Thomas Blythe, who was the postmaster at Pickett's Valley (later called Orleans Post Office) at the time. [49]

1830 Austin Peay lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina with 44 slaves. [50]

1830 Zadok Perry lived in Lancaster County, South Carolina with 16 slaves. [51]

1830 James B Pickett had a listing in Fairfield County, South Carolina with 15 slaves and no white people in the household, perhaps as a non-resident landowner?. Nearby were households for Elijah Henson, age 20-30, and for Rebecca Henson, age 30-40 (see 1829 entry), William W Lewis, Jeptha Alridge, William Hughes, Saunders Gibson, James Land, Samuel Stokes, Zachariah Gibson, Robert Adams, Nancy Wilson, and several Muloney families. [52]

1830 James B Pickett (age 40-50) lived in Chester County, South Carolina with 2 males age 20-30 in the household, and 69 slaves. [53]

1831 James Pickett transferred land, to Kizannah Pickett, in Franklin County, Georgia, that James had purchased in 1828 from Benjamin Harrison. Witnessed by Micajah Pickett, Van G A Griffin, and A W Hansell. Dated August 4. [54]

1833 James Pickett purchased two negroes from Stephen Powell. Witnessed by M C Pickett and Stephen Powell. [55]

1833 James B Pickett was the owner of 4 slaves on a steamboat from Charleston, South Carolina bound for Augusta & Hamburg. Their names were Jake (male, age 22), Susanna (female, age 21), Amarettes (female, age 20), and Lehhear (female, age 17) [56]

Micajah's son James (by Kisannah) bought some of Micajah's Greenville County, South Carolina land and moved his family and his mother there in the early 1830s. Kisannah may have died there.

1840 Zadock Perry lived in Lancaster County, South Carolina with 40 slaves. [57]

1840 James Pickett (age 50-60) lived in Greenville County, South Carolina with female age 80-90 (Kizannah?). [58]

1840 Austin F Peay lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina with 77 slaves. [59]

1840 Elija Hinson (age 30-40) lived in Lancaster County, South Carolina. Nearby listings were for John D Hinson and John Hinson Sr. [60]

1841 The will of Austin F Peay was dated October 10, 1834 and was in probate on October 22, 1841. The will named his heirs, many slaves, and property on Dutchman's Creek and on the Wateree, both are locations where Micajah Pickett owned land. The heirs included son Nicholas and several daughters. [61]

1841 Belravida Holcombe, and her trustee Kinchin Holcombe, entered into a marriage agreement with James Pickett. The agreement gave Belvarida the right to separate without hindrance with separation dower of $200 or with dower of $1000 if they stay together, dower held in trust by James B. Molly. [62] [63]

1845 James Pickett of Greenville County wrote his will on March 26 and named his wife Belvarida Kinchin Holcombe and minor children John, Mary, and Elizabeth. Executors Micajah B Pickett, nephew James B Mobly, relation Joseph Woodward, and relation Moses N Mobly. (Greenville County, Georgia, will book C, pages 189-192; estate packet: apt 11, file 58). Named in will: Aleck (Slave); Aveline (Slave); Ben Jr. (Slave); Ben Sr. (Slave); Charles, Joel; Charles, John; Charles, John Jr.; Davis, John; Davis, Sherman; Dill, C.P.; Farmer, John I.; Garrison, David; George (Slave); Harriet (Slave); Holcombe, Kinchin; Joe (Slave); Mobly, James B.; Mobly, Moses N.; Murfy; Picket, John Holcomb; Pickett, Belvarida; Pickett, Elizabeth Holcombe; Pickett, James; Pickett, Mary Holcome; Pickett, Micajah B.; Rice, Lewis; Roberts, Jeremiah; Synth (Slave); Woodward, Joseph. [64] [65] [66]

1845 James Pickett was buried on November 5, at Slave Cemetery, Greenville, Memorial Gardens, Greenville, South Carolina

1849 The will of John Holcombe of Greenville District, named Belvarida Pickett, among other heirs. Dated February 26. [67] [68] [69]

1850 Elijah Hinson (age 45) and wife Sarah lived in Chesterfield Twp, Chesterfield County, South Carolina (perhaps the Elishah of 1829). [70]

1850 Austin F Peay lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina. [71]

1850 Belvarida Picket (age 40, born in South Carolina) lived in Greenville County, South Carolina, in a household with John Picket (age 12), Mary Picket (age 10), Elizabeth Picket (age 8), Jane Picket (age 5), John Holcomb (age 22), Amarillis Holcomb (age 24), and Josephus Holcomb (age 1). [72]

Research Notes:

DNA [73]


Footnotes:

[1] Janet and Robert Wolfe, Genealogy Page for Robert Hinson, will dated 1820, [JRWolfeGenealogy].

[2] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Series: S213190 Volume: 0033 Page: 00275 Item: 001, [Image], [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[3] Greenville County, South Carolina Deed, I-419, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[4] United States Federal Census, 1810, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[5] United States Federal Census, 1810, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[6] United States Federal Census, 1810, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[7] United States Federal Census, 1810, page 115, [FamilySearchImage], [FamilySearchRecord].

[8] A. B. Pruitt, Abstracts of Deeds: Greenville Co, SC Books H&I (1807-1817) (2002), 77-78, citing Greenville County, South Carolina Deeds I-81, I-82, I-83, I-84, I-85, I-419.

[9] Greenville County, South Carolina Deed, I-83, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[10] Greenville County, South Carolina Deed, I-82, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[11] Greenville County, South Carolina Deed, I-81, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[12] Greenville County, South Carolina Deed, I-84, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[13] Greenville County, South Carolina Deed, I-85, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[14] Rutherford County, North Carolina, Deed 28-209, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[15] North Carolina Probate Records, 1735-1970, Rutherford, Will C-120, [FamilySearchImage].

[16] National Register of Historic Places, Greenville, South Carolina, Goodwin House, citing Greenville Co deed D-526, [National_Register].

[17] A. B. Pruitt, Abstracts of Deeds: Greenville Co, SC Books H&I (1807-1817) (2002), 145-46, citing Greenville County, South Carolina Deed I-510, which cites deed D-525, among others.

[18] Greenville County, South Carolina Deed, L-34, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[19] National Register of Historic Places, Greenville, South Carolina, Goodwin House, citing Greenville County deed L-34, [National_Register].

[20] Commissioner of Locations, South Carolina, Camden District, Plat books, 1785-1841, B1-61, [FamilySearchImage], [FSCatalog].

[21] United States Federal Census, 1820, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[22] United States Federal Census, 1820, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[23] United States Federal Census, 1820, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[24] United States Federal Census, 1820, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[25] United States Federal Census, 1820, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[26] United States Federal Census, 1820, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[27] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Series S165015, Item 67, [Image], [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[28] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, [Image], [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[29] A. B. Pruitt, Abstracts of Deeds: Greenville Co, SC Books Q&R (1828-1835) (2010), 20, citing Q-157.

[30] Internet Archive, A Register of Officers and Agents … United States, … September, 1929, [URL].

[31] Greenville, South Carolina, Post Office list, [URL].

[32] National Register of Historic Places, Greenville, South Carolina, Goodwin House, citing Greenville Historical Society Proceedings (1968):51, [National_Register].

[33] National Register of Historic Places, Greenville, South Carolina, Goodwin House, citing Mills' Atlas of the State of South Carolina, 1825 (reprinted 1980), [National_Register].

[34] Anne K. McCuen. Abstracts of Some Greenville County, South Carolina, Records Concerning Black People Free and Slave 1791-1865, Vol. 1 (1991), 66, citing case #219, Vol P-349, [GoogleBooks].

[35] Anne K. McCuen. Abstracts of Some Greenville County, South Carolina, Records Concerning Black People Free and Slave 1791-1865, Vol. 1 (1991), 58, citing case #193, Vol P-62, [GoogleBooks].

[36] A. B. Pruitt, Abstracts of Deeds: Greenville Co, SC Books N,O&P (1823-1828) (2007), 90, citing Greenville County, South Carolina Deed P-62.

[37] A. B. Pruitt, Abstracts of Deeds: Greenville Co, SC Books N,O&P (1823-1828) (2007), 90-91, citing Greenville County, South Carolina Deed P-66, 66, and 67.

[38] A. B. Pruitt, Abstracts of Deeds: Greenville Co, SC Books N,O&P (1823-1828) (2007), 121, citing Greenville Co, South Carolina Deed P-237.

[39] A. B. Pruitt, Abstracts of Deeds: Greenville Co, SC Books N,O&P (1823-1828) (2007), 135, citing Greenville County, South Carolina Deed P-310.

[40] A. B. Pruitt, Abstracts of Deeds: Greenville Co, SC Books N,O&P (1823-1828) (2007), 135, citing Greenville County, South Carolina Deed P-311.

[41] A. B. Pruitt, Abstracts of Deeds: Greenville Co, SC Books N,O&P (1823-1828) (2007), 142, citing Greenville Co, South Carolina Deed P-349.

[42] Greenville County, South Carolina Deed, P-349, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[43] Greenville County, South Carolina Deed, Q-79, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[44] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed, BBB-18, 2 deeds, [FamilySearchImage].

[45] A. B. Pruitt, Abstracts of Deeds: Greenville Co, SC Books Q&R (1828-1835) (2010), 20, citing Q-158.

[46] A. B. Pruitt, Abstracts of Deeds: Greenville Co, SC Books Q&R (1828-1835) (2010), 20, citing Q-158.

[47] W. R. Hill, Reports of cases in Chancery argued and determined in the Court of Appeals of South Carolina, Vol. 1 (Charleston, SC: 1858), n41, of 28-37 or *35-*47, original pagination, [InternetArchive].

[48] W. R. Hill, Reports of cases in Chancery argued and determined in the Court of Appeals of South Carolina, Vol. 2 (Charleston, SC: 1858), of 270-276, which was *351-*359, original pagination, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[49] National Register of Historic Places, Greenville, South Carolina, Goodwin House, [National_Register].

[50] United States Federal Census, 1830, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[51] United States Federal Census, 1830, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[52] United States Federal Census, 1830, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[53] United States Federal Census, 1830, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[54] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed, D-26, [FamilySearchImage].

[55] Anne K. McCuen. Abstracts of Some Greenville County, South Carolina, Records Concerning Black People Free and Slave 1791-1865, Vol. 1 (1991), 78, citing case #252, Vol R-151, [GoogleBooks].

[56] U.S., Southeast Coastwise Inward and Outward Slave Manifests, 1790-1860, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[57] United States Federal Census, 1840, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[58] United States Federal Census, 1840, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[59] United States Federal Census, 1840, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[60] United States Federal Census, 1840, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[61] South Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980, Fairfield County, South Carolina, will R19-41, [AncestryImage].

[62] Greenville County, South Carolina Deed, T-666, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[63] Greenville County, South Carolina Deed, T-667, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[64] South Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980, Greenville District, Will C-189, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[65] South Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980, Greenville District, Will C-123, transcribed, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[66] South Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980, Upper South Carolina, Greenville, 108, transcribed, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[67] South Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980, Greenville District, Will C-275, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[68] South Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980, Greenville District, Will C-275 transcribed, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[69] South Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1670-1980, Documents, Estate Packet: Apt 11, File 119, [AncestryRecord].

[70] United States Federal Census, 1850, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[71] United States Federal Census, 1850, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[72] United States Federal Census, 1850, [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[73] The family tree of a person who has a DNA match to Robert's family suggests a lineage to this sibling of Robert's ancestor. The lineage is through a descendant shown on our website, [Link].