Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy --- Go to Genealogy Page for Joseph King --- Go to Genealogy Page for Marcy Nicholson

Notes for Joseph King and Marcy Nicholson

1684 Joseph King, son of Harmanus and Mary King, was born in Flushing, Long Island, New York. [1]

1688 Mercy Nicholson, daughter of George and Hannah Nicholson, was born on 13 of month 12, 1687/88. [2]

1701 Joseph King was named on a tax list in Nottingham Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. [3]

1702 Richard French and Mary King were married on January 13, 1701/02, at the house of Harmenus King, Nottingham Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. Witnessed by Joseph King and others. [4]

1706 John King and Elizabeth Woodward were married on November 13, at Chesterfield. Witnessed by Joseph King and others. [5]

1707 Joseph King and Marcy Nicholson, both of the Chesterfield monthly meeting, declared their intention to marry, on 7 of month 6. Joseph's parents were both present and consented. [6] The Women's meeting recorded [7]:

Joseph King the Son of Harmenus King of this Meeting and Mercy Nicholson have published their Intentions of Joyning together in Marriage if God permit with Friends consent in order to which proceeding Mary Bunting and Mary Rockhill are to make orderly enquiry & give report to our next monthly meeting.

1707 Joseph King and Marcy Nicholson made their second declaration of intention to marry, at the Chesterfield, Burlington County, monthly meeting, on 4 September. [8] The Women's meeting recorded [9]:

Joseph King and Mercy Nicholson have the second time declared their Intentions of Marriage Friends upon deliberate consideration find no objection their parents & Relations concerned giving their consent also the two women friends bring nothing against the young woman So they are left to the men friends.

1710 Mercy King was appointed to speak to Mary Bunting and Anne Abbott because those two had attended a marriage contrary to Quaker discipline. [10]

1714 William King, son of Joseph King and Marcia Nicholson, was born on April 1, in Kingwood, New Jersey. [11]

1719/20 Joseph King, made inventory for the estate of Jonathan Taylor in Nottingham Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey, on March 12. [12]

1722 Robert Field married Mary Taylor, daughter of Samuel Taylor, on April 12, at the Chesterfield Meeting, Burlington County, New Jersey. Witnessed by Marcy Kinge and others. [13]

1724 Preserve Brown Jr. and Mary French were married on October 15. Witnessed by John and Mercy King and others. [14] [15]

1728 Joseph King made inventory for the estate of Thomas Baker on March 25, in Nottingham Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. [16]

1728 Francis King, perhaps Joseph's brother, and Mercy King witnessed the will of William Quicksall on August 28, in Nottingham Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. [17]

1729 Benjamin Shreeve and Rebecca French were married on April 23, in Upper Springfield, Burlington County. Witnessed by Joseph King and others. [18]

1729 Mercy King, perhaps a daughter of Joseph and Mercy, was advised by some Friends. [19]

Our Womens Meeting made application to our meeting for advice in proceeding with Mercy King for some disorderly practice whereupon this meeting appoints our Friends Isaac Horner & Thomas Lambert to accompany some Women Friends to visit her & use their Christian endeavors to admonish, reprove, & if possible be instrumental to reclaim her and make report of their sucess therein to our next meeting.

1729 Joseph King bought 954 acres of land [in Franklin Twp, Hunterdon County], along the South Branch of the Raritan, from Mary Tomkins and settled and built a mill near Young's Mills [so-named in later years]. [20] [21] [22]

1733 "In 1733 Samuel Large, Samuel Willson, John Stevenson, Edward Rockhill and Joseph King act as trustees for four acres of land for the use of the meeting, which are deeded by Jacob Doughty." [23] [24]. Joseph King was a trustee of the Friend's meeting at Quakertown (Bethlehem) [25].

Joseph King had sons Joseph and William and daughter Rebecca [26] or Hannah [27] [28].

1736 Thomas King, son of Joseph, was buried on 9-15-1736. [29]

1737 The inventory for Jacob Doughty, father-in-law of son William, was made, by Joseph Wilits and Joseph King, on August 1. [30]

1741 Two men named Joseph King, one of Amwell Twp [31] and one of Bethlehem Twp [32], were named as freeholders in Hunterdon County, New Jersey for the purpose of selecting a jury.

1746 Mercy King and Mary Bunting were appointed by the Bethlehem meeting in Hunterdon County to attend the Burlington Quarterly Meeting. [33]

1749 On 8 12, "At the request of Friends at the Meadows for a committee for fixing upon a place for building a Meeting House this Meeting appoints Jeremiah Williams. Joseph King Senior. Joseph Webster, Joseph King Junior, and William King a committee to assist Friends at the Meadows as soon as they conveniently may." [34]

1752 On 13 2, "This Meeting appoints Jeremiah Williams, Jonathan Robeson, Joseph King Sen. and Thomas Atkinson to agree with suetable workmen to repair the Meetinghouse of Friends in Kingwood (known by the name of Bethlehem Meetinghouse) in such sort manner and form as they think best." [35]

1753 Mary Williams and Mercy King reported to the Chesterfield Meeting about Margaret Brown's clearness to marry. [36]

1753 Joseph King and [son-in-law] Mansfield Hunt made inventory for the estate of Adolphus Crishan, of Amwell, Hunterdon County, on May 20. [37]

1756 Joseph King Sr was appointed elder of the Kingwood (Quakertown) Branch of the Friends meeting. [38]

1756 Joseph King and wife granted land to Thomas Coate in Amwell, Huntercon County, New Jersey, on July 20. [39]

1759 Joseph King, Sr., of Kingwood Twp., Hunterdon County, yeoman, dated his will on October 20. Son, Joseph, 5 shillings, as I have given to him much. Son, William, 5 shillings, he having had his portion. Granddaughter, Mercy Hunt, some goods, which are now in keeping of my son, William. My plantation in Kingwood, where I lately lived, to be sold. Executors: my eldest son, Joseph, and my son-in-law, Mansfield Hunt, my grandson, Joseph Hunt, my grandson, Joseph King (the son of my son William). Witnesses: John Mullinner, Thomas Coate, John Brock. Proved Jan. 2, 1762. [40]

1764 On 12 April, "All Persons having any Demands against the Estate of Joseph King, late of the Township of Kingswood, and County of Hunterdon, New-Jersey, deceased are desired speedily to bring in their Accounts, that they may be adjusted by the Subscribers; those indebted to the said Estate are desired to make speedy Payment to us, who are empowered to demand the same. Joseph King, Mansfield Hunt, Executors." [41]

1761 Joseph King died on December 10, in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. [42] Joseph King, age 78th year, was buried at Friends Burying Ground, Kingwood Twp, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. [43] A memorial obituary was preserved in the Kingwood Meeting records. He died in his 78th year. [44].

A memorial of the time of Death & Burial of Joseph King, Senior, [c. 1683 -1761] reports [45]:

Our antient Friend Joseph King departed this Life the 10th day of the 12th month 1761, In the Seventy-eighth year of his age, and was Inter'd in Friends Burying Ground at Kingwood the Eleventh day of the same Month. He was not, as could be perceived, attended with any Violent illness, and he departed quietly as one going to Sleep. He was esteem'd .amongst us to be an Honest, Sober, innocent, well-minded man, a good & Inoffensive Neighbor, well beloved of Friends & others, for which reasons he was appointed an Elder amongst us before the Select meeting was settled here, and for the same reasons hath been continued an Elder amongst us ever since until his Death, and we doubt not but that he is gone to Eternal rest.

1764 Joseph King, of Kingwood, Hunterdon County, Ward, Grandson of Joseph King, of said place, deceased, chose a guardian on June 6. He makes choice of Robert Emley as his Guardian. Guardian: Robert Emley, of Kingwood, said County. Fellowbondsman: Joseph Hollinshead, of City of Burlington. Witness: Joseph Read. [46]

A biosketch reports [47]:

Joseph King, Sr., was a farmer in Burlington Co., N. J., afterward in Piscataway, Middlesex Co., whence he finally removed, in 1729, to what is now Franklin Township, in the central part of Hunterdon County, N. J., where he purchased of Mary Tomkins 954 acres of land situated along the south branch of Raritan River, and settled on it, building there, in 1733, a grist-mill about four miles from Kingwood Friends' MeetingHouse. He was one of the first trustees of the Meeting property there, associated with Edward Rockhill, John Stevenson, Samuel Willson, & Samuel Large; he was appointed an Elder in Kingwood M. M., 14 of 11 mo., 1744, and an overseer 12 of 7 mo., 1745. A Meeting for worship was begun in this part of Hunterdon Co., about the year 1729, and Bethlehem (afterward called Kingwood) Monthly Meeting was established as early as 1741. The oldest records of the meeting, dating from this time, are kept at Newtown, Pa. Hardwick meeting for worship was established in 1745, but it continued to be a branch of Kingwood Monthly Meeting until 1797. Among the Elders for that M. M. in 1756, beside Joseph King, Sr., for the Hunterdon Co. Friends, Richard Lundy and Thomas Lundy were named for the Hardwick Branch.

A biosketch reports "Joseph King, son of Harmanus King and Marcia his wife, came to Hunterdon County." also "He [Joseph] and his wife Marcia had two sons ..." [48]

"Joseph [King] (s. of Herman), went from New Jersey to Bucks Co., Pa., and from there to Piscataway, Middlesex Co. In 1729, he bought 900 acres along the South Branch and settled near Young's Mills; his name is on list of Quakers, 1733; m. Marcia and had: Joseph, b. 9 March, 1712; William, b. 1 April, 1714; Hannah, b. 7 Nov., 1717." [49]

Research Notes:

There was another King family which lived in Long Island and Morristown, New Jersey, not to be confused with this one [50]

There was more than one man named Joseph King, who lived in Long Island and New Jersey. Some of these notes are ambiguous about whether they refer to Joseph, the son of Harmanus King, and might be misplaced in the notes above.


Footnotes:

[1] Lewis Publishing, Encyclopedia of Genealogy and Biography of the State of Pennsylvania, Vol. 2 (1904), 1051, [GoogleBooks].

[2] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Untitled: Chesterfield Births and Deaths, 3, [AncestryImage].

[3] New Jersey Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1643-1890, 1701, [AncestryRecord].

[4] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 56, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[5] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 66, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[6] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Men's Minutes, 1684-1738, 102, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[7] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Minutes, 1688-1809, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[8] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Men's Minutes, 1684-1738, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[9] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Minutes, 1688-1809, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[10] U.S. Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Meeting, Minutes, 1688-1809, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[11] Lewis Publishing, Encyclopedia of Genealogy and Biography of the State of Pennsylvania, Vol. 2 (1904), 1051, [GoogleBooks].

[12] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 456, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[13] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 88, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[14] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 47, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[15] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724 , 90, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[16] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 24, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[17] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 30. (Wills and Administrations 2, 1730-1750) (1918), 388, [GoogleBooks], [HathiTrust].

[18] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Burlington Monthly Meeting, Minutes, 1677-1777 (includes many different types of records), 223, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[19] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Men's Minutes, 1684-1738, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[20] James P. Snell, History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1881), 431, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[21] James P. Snell, History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1881), 523, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[22] Mary C. Vail, "A historical sketch of the Meeting and Meeting House of the Society of Friends, at Quakertown, N.J.," The Jerseyman 2(1893), 9-12, at 9, [InternetArchive].

[23] James W. Moore, "The Kingwood Records" The Jerseyman 4 (1898), 6, [InternetArchive].

[24] Mary C. Vail, "A historical sketch of the Meeting and Meeting House of the Society of Friends, at Quakertown, N.J.," The Jerseyman 2(1893), 9-12, at 10, [InternetArchive].

[25] James P. Snell, History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1881), 431, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[26] James P. Snell, History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1881), 431, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[27] James P. Snell, History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1881), 523, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[28] Theodore Frelinghuysen Chambers, The Early Germans of New Jersey (1895), 431, [InternetArchive].

[29] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Philadelphia Monthly Meeting, Arch Street, Abstract of Record of Births, Deaths and Burials, 1688-1826, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[30] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 30. (Wills and Administrations 2, 1730-1750) (1918), 148, [GoogleBooks], [HathiTrust].

[31] Norman C. Wittwer, "Hunterdon County Freeholders, 1741," The Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey 37 (1962), 49-56, at 55.

[32] Norman C. Wittwer, "Hunterdon County Freeholders, 1741," The Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey 37 (1962), 49-56, at 56.

[33] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Rahway and Plainfield Monthly Meeting, Union, New Jersey, Register of Marriages, Births, and Deaths, 1687-1871, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[34] James W. Moore, "The Kingwood Records" The Jerseyman 4 (1898), 7, [InternetArchive].

[35] James W. Moore, "The Kingwood Records" The Jerseyman 4 (1898), 8, [InternetArchive].

[36] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Rahway and Plainfield Monthly Meeting, Union, New Jersey, Register of Marriages, Births, and Deaths, 1687-1871, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[37] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 32. (Wills and Administrations 3, 1751-1760) (1924), 81, [InternetArchive].

[38] Mary C. Vail, "A historical sketch of the Meeting and Meeting House of the Society of Friends, at Quakertown, N.J.," The Jerseyman 2(1893), 9-12, at 10, [InternetArchive].

[39] New Jersey State Archives, Early Land Records, 1650-1801 (online database), A-M : Folio 136 (SSTSE023), [NJ_State_Archives].

[40] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 33. (Wills and Administrations 4, 1761-1770) (1928), 233, citing Lib. 11, p. 343, [InternetArchive].

[41] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 24. (Newspapers 5, 1762-1765) (1902), 350, citing The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1842, April 12, 1764, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[42] Lewis Publishing, Encyclopedia of Genealogy and Biography of the State of Pennsylvania, Vol. 2 (1904), 1051, [GoogleBooks].

[43] James P. Snell, History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1881), 440, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[44] James W. Moore, "The Kingwood Records" The Jerseyman 4 (1898), 36, [InternetArchive].

[45] Ambrose Milton Shotwell, Annals of Our Colonial Ancestors and Their Descendants (1895-97), 272, citing Records of Kingwood Monthly Meeting, [GoogleBooks].

[46] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 33. (Wills and Administrations 4, 1761-1770) (1928), 233, citing Lib. 11, p. 521, [InternetArchive].

[47] Ambrose Milton Shotwell, Annals of Our Colonial Ancestors and Their Descendants (1895-97), 272, [GoogleBooks].

[48] James P. Snell, History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1881), 523, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[49] Theodore Frelinghuysen Chambers, The Early Germans of New Jersey (1895), 431, [InternetArchive].

[50] F.K., of Rahway, N.J., "Genealogy of a Branch of the King Family," New England Historical and Genealogical Register 11 (1857), 357-359.