Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy --- Go to Genealogy Page for John Hicks --- Go to Genealogy Page for Herodias Long

Notes for John Hicks and Herodias Long

1613 In July "John Sonne of Robert Hickes of Radclife shipwright" was baptized "ye xjth" [11 July] at St. Dunstan's, Stepney. This baptism occurred at about the right time to agree with the age John stated in his marriage allegation. However, no evidence has been found to link the subject of this baptism to the John Hicks who married Herodias Long. In January 1614/15, "Richard sonne of Robert Hickes of Nightingalelame carpinter" was "bapt. the first day beinge ix daies ould" at St. Dunstan's, Stepney. Nightingale Lane was in Ratcliff. A Robert Hickes and Elizabeth Nagelley were married at St. James Clerkenwell, Islington, on 16 September 1612.

1636 John Hicks "became a freeman, or member, of the Salters on 13 June 1636." [1] [2]

14 March 1636[/37] "Wch daie appeared personally John Hickes of the parish of St Olaves in Southwark Salter And a batchelour aged about 23 yeares And alledged that he intendeth to marrie with Harwood Long spinster aged about 21 yeares the daughter of William Long husbandman who giveth his Consent to this intended marriage And of the truth of the pr[e]mises as also that he knows of no Lawfull let or impediment by reason of anie pr[ior] contract consanguinity affinity or otherwise to hinder his intended marriage he made faith And desires licence to be married in the parish Church of St Faith London. [signed] John Hickes" [3]

1638 John Hicks was admitted to Newport, Rhode Island. [4]

Inhabitants admitted at the Towne of Nieu-Port since the 20th of the 3rd 1638.
… John Merchant, July 2. Jeremy Gould, Enoch Hunt, Nathaniel Adams, Samuel Allen, George Allen, Ralph Allen, Mr. Thomas Burton, Henry Bishop, John Hicks, Edward Browse, Mathew Gridell, Aug. 6.


1641 "The Court Roll of Freemen [Newport, Rhode Island], with the officers, as they were Elected on the 16th of March, 1641." ... [list] John Hicks. [5]

1648 John Hicks and William Toorn were magistrates of Flushing, Long Island. [6]

1652 John Hicks and two others, unrecorded, were magistrates of Flushing, Long Island. [7]

1653 On 26 November, delegates from the High Council of New Netherland met at the city hall of New Amsterdam with delegates from several towns, including Flushing, which was represented by John Hicks and Tobias Feeks [8]. They discussed how to stop robberies. The English delegates indicated that they should not pay taxes if they could not be protected from robbery. On December 14, the delegates were told that they should not address the council any further. [9] On 11 December, John Hicks and several other delegates petitioned Director Stuyvesant concerning their relationship to the Dutch government. The petition began "We acknowledge a paternal government which God and Nature have established in the world for the maintenance and preservation of peace, and the good of mankind, not only agreeable to Nature's laws, but in accord with the rules and precepts of God, to which we consider ourselves bound by His word." [10]

1655 June 1, Divorce granted to John Hicks, of Flushing, L.I., from his wife, Hardwood Long, on the ground of her adultery, with leave to Hicks to remarry. [11]

1656 Oct. 31. Proceedings in a suit. John Hicks vs. Hendrick Jansen, for payment of land purchased from Mr. Carman; case postponed on condition that defendant deposit the amount demanded, in the secretary's office. [12]

1656/57 On 12 March, John Hicks was among those who witnessed an "agreement betwixt the Governor of ye New-Netherlands and" Indian sachems, in Hempstead, Long Island. [13]

1657 On 4 July, representatives of several Indian groups confirmed that the land of Hempstead, Long Island had been sold in 1643. Richard Gildersleeve, John Seaman, and John Hicks were witnesses. [14] [15]

1657 An account of calves given in to be kept 1657 listed Mr Hicks with 9. [16]

1657 On 11 June, an account of the number of cattle turned to the neck recorded John Hicks horse and cattle 24. [17]

1658 Feb. 26. Order. On an application of Hendrick Jansen, smith, for restitution of moneys paid John Hicks for land. [18]

1658 March 19. Minute. That Jacques Corteljou laid before the council the survey of the land near Middelborgh, L. I., in dispute between John Hicks and Hendrick Jansen, and order thereupon. [19] [20]

1657-1658 Mr. John Hicks was listed in an accounting of gates, cattle, land, and taxes in Hempstead, Long Island. [21] [22] [23]

1658 Dec. 19. Summons. Thomas Foster, Symon Seren, Ariaen Forman, John Hicks, John Smith, John Heerman, Aeltie Cornelissen, James Paine, Thomas Yrland, William Yets and Jeremy Wood, of Hempstead, to answer the complaint of the farmer of the excise tax on wine and liquor. [24] [25] [26]

1659 Mr. Hicks was listed among "persons that are to fense and Inclose Rockoway w'th ye Nomb'r of their gates donn at A full town-meeting the 17th of Aprill 1659." [27]

1659/60 On 3 February, Mr. Hicks was compensated by Hempstead for linen and for trading cloth for the Indians. [28]

1660 Dec. 15. Appointment. John Hicks and Robert Ashman as magistrates of that town [Hempstead]. [29]

1661 February 23. Letter. Squire Hickes to director Stuyvesant; requests the appointment of a magistrate [Hempstead] in place of Mr. Ashman, who cannot read or write. February 25. Director Stuyvesant to the town of Hempstead ; recommends the election of Richard Gildersleeve to be magistrate of that town. [30]

1661 April 7. Petition. John Carman, Caleb Carman and Benjamin Coe, husband of Abigail Carman, praying that John Hicks, who married their mother, may be obliged to render an account of the estate; copy to be furnished Mr. Hicks. [31]

1661/62 John Hicks and Rachell Starre made a marriage agreement on 22 January [32]:

January the 22 1662. (Sti. Nov.)
Conditions of an Agreement made betwixt John Hickes of Hempsted of the one Party, And Eachell Starre of Oyterbay of the other Party Joyntly and freely agreed upon by both parties before they enter or joyne in Marriage estate, about the settling of their Estates, and for the preventing of Differences betwixt the Children of the said John Hickes and Rachell Starres Children, wch is as followeth, That what Estate the said Rachell Starre shall bring to the said John Hickes of her owne (being taken upon Inventory) If it please God to take her away first by Death, that then ye said estate which Shee brought to ye said John Hickes shall returne to ye Children of ye sd Eachell Starre. And likewise the Estate of the sd John Hickes, which is given in by him by Inventory, the Day and yeare above written, In ye presenc of Mr Richard Gildersleve, Mr Robart Ashman, & Jonas Houldsworth, Amounting to the Summe of thirteen thousand three hundred and sixty gilders, and all Debte Discharged, Shall likewise return to his Children, in Case that the sd John Hickes bee taken away by Death before her the said Rachell Starre, (as is before specified to her Children;. And further it is agreed upon between them, that if it shall please God that their Estates shall or Do increase that then the said increase shall equally bee Divided, the one half to him and his Children, and the other half to her and her Children, at the death of either of them. And further the sd John Hickes Doth give to the sd Rachell Starre (in case hee Die first) During her Widdowhood, the house and Lands which he now liveth in, with all the Earable lands and Meddowe belonging to it and Six Cowes, Foure Oxen, with the Instruments of Husbandry belonging to them, with so much of the housaldstuff as shee shall think meet for her Necessary use and a good horse for her use. In witnesse whereof wee Do Mutually hereunto set our hands the day and yeare before specified.
John Hickes, Rachell Starre
Testes: Richard Gildersleve, Robert Ashman, Jonas Houldswobth
This is a true Copie Compared with the Originall both of them being written per me
Jonas Houldswobth

1662 On 4 February, Jonas Houldsworth, clerk of Hempstead, wrote to governor Peter Stuyvesant seeking confirmation of magistrates from a list of six men, including John Hicks, that the town had nominated according to their patent and custom. On 6 February, the director-general [governor] and council selected and confirmed John Hicks, Robert Ashman, and Robert Jackson as commissaries for Hempstead. [33]

1662 On May 16, John Hicks and Robert Jackson wrote to the council seeking guidance for how to deal with inhabitants of Hempstead who refused to pay the tax for the salary of the town minister. [34] [35]

1662 On 27 October. Letter. John Youngs to John Hicks, of Hempstead, informing them that it pleaseth his majesty to involve Long Island in the Connecticut patent, and requiring all the inhabitants to forbear taking an oath of fidelity to any other state. [36] [37]

1663 On 18 January, Jonas Houldsworth, clerk of Hempstead, wrote to governor Peter Stuyvesant seeking confirmation of three magistrates from a list of six men, including John Hicks, that the town had nominated according to their patent and custom. On 20 January, the director-general [governor] and council selected and confirmed John Hicks, Robert Ashman, and Richard Gildersleeve as magistrates for Hempstead. [38] [39]

1664 On 7 January, Tapausagh, sachem of the Long Island Indians appeared before the Director and council with an interpreter present and reported that the English settlers at Flushing had spoken with them about purchasing a parcel of land. Mr Doughty and many others wanted to set a price, but the Indians said that they must ask their people whether or not to sell the land before setting a price. The Indians asked whether the settlers of Hempstead, Rustdorp, or Jamaica had also invited the Indians. Mr. [John] Hicks and his son [apparently of Hempstead] had been at the meeting, but had only listened and had not spoken. The English settlers said that three ships would come from England and drive out the Dutch and Stuyvesant, and the land belonged to them, and if Stuyvesant tried to do anything, they would bind his hands to his back and send him out of the country or kill him; but if he kept quiet, it would be well and me might remain in his own house and on his land, like any other man. The Indians were told that the land on Long Island had been conveyed to the Dutch in 1639 by the father of Tapausagh, and the sale was confirmed in 1656, so the Indians must not sell the land. [40]

1665 After the English defeated the Dutch, the English Governor Richard Nichols announced "to settle good and knowne Lawes within this Government for the future, and receive your best advice and Informacon ... at Hempsteed upon Long Island, shall be held a Generall meeting, wch is to consist of Deputyes chosen by the major part of the freemen onely ... whether English, or Dutch." The deputies met in Hempstead on 1 March 1664/5. John Hicks and Robert Jackson were the Deputies from Hempstead. [41] [42] [43] [44] "March 1, 1665 [1664/5], a convention was held at Hempstead under authority of the English governor ... Delegates ... Hempstead. John Hicks. Robert Jackson." [45]

1666 On 20 April, governor Richard Nicholls sent a warrant to John Hicks, justice of the peace at Hempstead, with instructions to uphold the law and to send to jail, in New York if need be, any persons not paying their taxes, since some inhabitants of Hempstead had refused to pay taxes to constable Jackson. [46]

1668 March 6, "Confirmation Patent for the town of Hempsteed on Long Island from Gov Nicolls to John Hicks, John Seaman, Richard Gildersleeve, and others freeholders of said town." [47]

1669 A matter of difference between Francis Doughty of Newtown, on the behalf of Francis Doughty his father, heretofore minister of Flushing, and Mr. John Hicks, Capt John Underhill, and Mr. William Laurence, representing others of the town, concerning a yearly salary paid to Mr. Doughty for his pains as minister, was considered by the governor at Fort James in New York on 27 March. [48]

1671 On 25 April, at a town meeting in Hempstead, it was voted and ordered "That no person or Persns inhabiting within this towne or the liberties thereof, shall plow or break up any Planting Land for the Indyans, nor shall no way assist them therein, under the penalty of forfeiting for every day... 20 shillings to the use of the towne. It is further ordered, that Mr. John Hicks, George Hewlett and John Jackson, do go downe to Rockaway tomorrow, and forewarn all Indyans to depart thence, except such as do really belong to that place ..." [49]

1672 On 10 June, the council minutes for Long Island affairs reported the [election] returns for constable of Hempstead with 39 votes for Robert Jackson and 34 votes for Simon Seryou. Objection was made by Mr John Hicks [named as Thomas Hicks on the next page] and James Pine, on behalf of others, that many of the votes for Mr. Jackson were from great Neck or Mad-nans Neck, with only small, divided, parcels of land unrelated to the town of Hempstead, and questioned whether they should be counted equally with ye ancient inhabitants. The council determined that all the inhabitants were freeholders and their votes would count, although a proposal would be considered for them to be in a separate town with officers of their own. [50]

1672 Will of John Hicks, Hempstead, "Being weak in body but sound in understanding," makes son Thomas executor, and "he is to pay to my wife Rachel, 100 in cattle, according to wheat at 5 shillings a bushell." Leaves to wife household utensils, "besides her own wearing clothes, and what goods my said wife brought with her to me." I leave to each one of my daughter Haviland's children, a colt." Leaves to daughter Hannah 100, one-third in horses and two-thirds in cattle. Legacies to "children of my son Thomas," and to "my son-in-law Josyas Starr." Dated April 29, 1672. The will is also signed by his wife Rachel, "in token of her satisfaction." Witnesses, Jonah Fordham, Richard Valentine. Proved at Court of Sessions, held in Jamaica, June 14, 1672. Anthony Waters, Clerk. Letters of Administration granted to Thomas Hicks, June 17, 1672. [51]

1675 In October, the council minutes reported Indian claims to land in Cows Neck, Little Madnans, and Great Madnans north of Hempstead. The parcels had been purchased under Hempstead, now Flushing, and had been spoken of in Governor Nicolls time and at discussions were held with the Indians at Mr. Hixes, but nothing was concluded except that a present should be given to them to satisfy them. It was concluded that no powder or lead should be sold to the Indians. [52]

Research Notes:

See NEHGR 1936 v 90 p 152ff and 1937 v91 p 286ff for Josiah Starr. He was the son of John's second wife Rachel, widow of Thomas Starr.

Herodius and John divorced and she married 2nd George Gardiner (common law marrige about 1645/46). They were divorced in 1665 and she married 3rd John Porter.

Leon Clark Hills states that John Hicks [53] [54]

came to New England in 1635, and resided for a while at Weymouth, Massachusetts, then to Newport, Rhode Island, and finally moved to Hemstead, Long Island, NY, in 1642, where he became quite active as an adjuster of Indian claims to land. He was a delegate from Long Island in 1663 to a Council called by Governor Nicoll of New York "to make additions and alterations to existing laws." Representative from Flushing to Convention called by Governor Stuyvesant in New Amsterdam 1653. Justice of the Peace 1666. Grantee of Patents of land in town of Hempstead, Mar. 6, 1666, and the first patent for Flushing granted by Governor Keift to English emigrants included John Hicks.


Footnotes:

[1] Personal Communication, Katie George, Salters' Company Archivist, email 24 July 2012, "the Great Fire of London in 1666 ... destroyed almost all the Salters' membership records. The very brief details on John ... come from a stray 'index to freedom register no longer existing, 1636 to 1656', which ... survived the fire.".

[2] John Anderson Brayton, "Robert, William, and Thomas Hicks of Flushing, Long Island, NY, and Granville County, North Carolina," North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal 26 (2003), 278-309 at 281, reported a similar correspondence.

[3] London Metropolitan Archives, Marriage Bonds and Allegations, MS10091, "London and Surrey, England, Marriage Bonds and Allegations, 1597-1921", image 44, [AncestryImage].

[4] John Russell Bartlett, Records of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations in New England, Vol. 1, 1636-1663 (1856), 92, [InternetArchive].

[5] John Russell Bartlett, Records of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations in New England, Vol. 1, 1636-1663 (1856), 110, [InternetArchive].

[6] Henry D. Waller, History of the town of Flushing, Long Island, New York (Flushing: Ridenour, 1899), 56, [HathiTrust].

[7] Henry D. Waller, History of the town of Flushing, Long Island, New York (Flushing: Ridenour, 1899), 56, [HathiTrust].

[8] Stephen C. Hutchins and Edgar Albert Werner, Civil List and Constitutional History of the Colony and State of New York (Albany, New York: 1891), 63, [GoogleBooks].

[9] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 223, of 223-24, 238, [GoogleBooks].

[10] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., and John Romeyn Brodhead, Documents relative to the Colonial History of the State of New York: Procured in Holland, England, and France Vol. 1, (Albany: Weed, Parson & Company, 1856), 550-552, [HathiTrust].

[11] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 149, citing Vol VI, p 49, [InternetArchive].

[12] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 176, citing Vol VIII, p 255, [InternetArchive].

[13] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 45, of 43-45, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[14] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 46, of 45-46, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[15] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 416, [GoogleBooks].

[16] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 22, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[17] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 28, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[18] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 191, citing Vol VIII, p 739, [InternetArchive].

[19] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 192, citing Vol VIII, p 772, [InternetArchive].

[20] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 412, [GoogleBooks].

[21] Henry Onderdonk, The Annals of Hempstead, 1643 to 1832 (Hempstead, NY: Lott Van de Water, 1878), 38, [HathiTrust].

[22] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 21, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[23] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 31, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[24] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 204, citing Vol VIII, p 1073, [InternetArchive].

[25] Henry Onderdonk, The Annals of Hempstead, 1643 to 1832 (Hempstead, NY: Lott Van de Water, 1878), 18, right column, citing Dutch Mss, viii, 1073, [HathiTrust].

[26] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 426, [GoogleBooks].

[27] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 81, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[28] Henry Onderdonk, The Annals of Hempstead, 1643 to 1832 (Hempstead, NY: Lott Van de Water, 1878), 19, [HathiTrust].

[29] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 219, citing Vol IX, p 454, [InternetArchive].

[30] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 221, citing Vol IX, p 533,535, [InternetArchive].

[31] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 223, citing Vol IX, p 574, [InternetArchive].

[32] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 82, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[33] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 509, [GoogleBooks].

[34] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 513, [GoogleBooks].

[35] Henry Onderdonk, The Annals of Hempstead, 1643 to 1832 (Hempstead, NY: Lott Van de Water, 1878), 43, [HathiTrust].

[36] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 241, citing Vol X, p 253, [InternetArchive].

[37] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 517, [GoogleBooks].

[38] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 521, [GoogleBooks].

[39] Henry Onderdonk, The Annals of Hempstead, 1643 to 1832 (Hempstead, NY: Lott Van de Water, 1878), 43, [HathiTrust].

[40] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 540, [GoogleBooks].

[41] Journal of the Legislative Council of the Colony of New York, 1691-1743 (Albany: Weed, Parsons & Company, 1861), V, [HathiTrust].

[42] Peter Ross, A History of Long Island, Vol. 1 (1902), 64, of 64-65, [GoogleBooks].

[43] Silas Wood, Alden J Spooner, A Sketch of the First Settlement of the Several Towns on Long Island (Brooklyn: Alden Spooner, 1828; Reprint 1865), 175, [InternetArchive].

[44] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 565, [GoogleBooks].

[45] Stephen C. Hutchins and Edgar Albert Werner, Civil List and Constitutional History of the Colony and State of New York (Albany, New York: 1891), 63-64, [GoogleBooks].

[46] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 578, [GoogleBooks].

[47] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, Calendar of N.Y. Colonial Manuscripts, Indorsed Land Papers; In the Office of the Secretary of State of New York 1643-1803 (Albany, New York: Weed, Parsons & Co, 1864), 4, [GoogleBooks].

[48] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 619, of 619-20, 629, [GoogleBooks].

[49] Alfred Henry Bellot, History of the Rockaways from the year 1685 to 1917 (Far Rockaway, New York: Bellot's Histories, 1917), 15, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[50] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 667, of 667-68, [GoogleBooks].

[51] William S. Pelletreau, Abstracts of Wills on file in the Surrogate's office: city of New York, Vol. 1, 1665-1707 (New York: The New York Historical Society, 1893), 23, Will 1-2.91, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive], [GoogleBooks].

[52] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 705, [GoogleBooks].

[53] Leon Clark Hills, History and Genealogy of the Mayflower Planters and First Comers to ye Olde Colonie, Cape Cod Series, Vol. 2 (Kalamazoo, Michigan: Chambers Publishing Company, 1941), [GoogleBooks].

[54] Leon Clark Hills, History and Genealogy of the Mayflower Planters and First Comers to ye Olde Colonie, Cape Cod Series, Vol. 2 (Kalamazoo, Michigan: Chambers Publishing Company, 1941), Person IVc, [AncestryImage].