Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy --- Go to Genealogy Page for Samuel Ivins --- Go to Genealogy Page for Sarah Platt

Notes for Samuel Ivins and Sarah Platt

1766 Sarah Platt and Samuel Ivins were married on December 20. [1] The license reports "Samuel Ivins and Barzillah [Barzillia - his mark, likely Samuel's brother] Ivins, both of the County of Burlington, township of New Hanover ... [bound to]...William Franklin, Governor... 500 pounds... 20 Dec 1766. ... Sam'l Ivins & Berzillah Ivins...obtained license of marriage for the said Samuel Ivins... and Sarah Platt, spinster... [w] Jos Borden, Jos Potts". [2] [Photocopy] Marriage record Samuel Ivins-Sarah Platt. [Map] with New Hanover township in Burlington County, New Jersey, 1872.

1768-72 Children Samuel, Mary, and Sarah Ivins were born.

1771 "Samuel Ivins Jr laid before this meeting an acknowledgement condemning his marriage contrary to good order to a woman not of our society which was read and refer'd to our next meeting" on 7 of month 2, at the Chesterfield meeting. [3]

1771 "Samuel Ivins Ju'r's acknowledgement was read again at this meeting and received" on 3 of month 7, at the Chesterfield meeting. [4]

1772 Samuel Ivins, wife Sarah and children Samuel, Mary, and Sarah were granted a certificate to transfer to Little Egg Harbor Quaker meeting from the Chesterfield meeting, Burlington County, New Jersey, on 5th of 3 month. [5] [6]. [Map] Central New Jersey, 1777. Map legend: Haddonfield is south of the letter "B" and west of the word County in Burlington County. Little Egg harbor is to the south on the coast.

1773 Samuel Ivins of Stafford Twp, Monmouth County, New Jersey had died intestate and his estate was dated April 2 with inventory dated April 1 valued at £299.3.11, made by Empson Kirby and Joseph Randolph. Administered by Sarah Ivins. Bondsman Isaac Ivins of Chesterfield [perhaps Samuel's father]. [7] [Map] Little Egg Harbor, Stafford Twp, Monmouth County, New Jersey, 1781.

1773 Sarah Ivins, widow of Samuel, and her children Mary, Samuel, and Sarah, had a certificate of transfer from Little Egg Meeting to Chesterfield meeting, on 2 of month 8. [8] [9]

c 1775 Sarah Platt Ivins then married Samuel Wardell, himself already a widower with children Phoebe and Rebecca Wardell. [10] [11]

1776 Thomas Wardell was born to Sarah and Samuel Wardell.

1777 Samuel Wardell was named as a brother in the will of John Wardell, of New Hanover, Burlington County, New Jersey. [12]

1778 Sarah and children moved to 'Sandy Farm' near Recklesstown and stayed there for 5 years.

1780 Samuel Wardell, of Shrewsbury, Monmouth Co. dated his will in May. Wife, Sarah, goods. Sons have had land, except Eliakem. Son, Joseph, 5 shilling's. Son, Eliakem, the land I rented to Danel Covert. Mention is made of William Wardell. Grandson, Samuel, son of Solomon, a lot. Daughter, Margaret Arney, a meadow. Daughter, Hannah Lovel, land. Daughter, Elizabeth Emley, 5 shillings. John Slocum's 4 daughters, bonds. Executors: son, Eliakem, and son, Samuel. Witnesses: Adam Woolley, William Woolley, Levy Woolley. Proved May 13, 1783. 1783, May 8. Renunciation by Eliacam Wardell. Witnesses: Solomon Wardell and John Lovell. [13]

1781 Eliza Wardell, daughter of Sarah and Samuel Wardell, was born.

Anthony Wardell, son of Sarah and Samuel Wardell, was born.

1783 Sarah Wardel and children Samuel Ivins, Mary Ivins, and Sarah Ivins were on a list of members of the Upper Freehold particular meeting, Burlington County, New Jersey, on 7 of month 5. [14] [15]

1784 John Platt, son of Thomas Platt, married Alice Stevenson, daughter of William Stevenson, at Upper Freehold, Monmouth County, on September 23. Witnessed by Sarah and Phebe Wardell, Mary Ivins, and many others. [16]

1784 Samuel Wardell died. Samuel's oldest daughters, by his first marriage, Phoebe and Rebecca Wardell, were adopted by two of their aunts and never rejoined the family. Sarah Platt-Ivins-Wardell and her brother John Platt were named executors to Samuel Wardell's estate, which had both substantial land and substantial debt. They managed to avoid having to sell the estate, which they named "Rural Retreat".

1784-85 Son Samuel Ivins was adopted by his grandfather Isaac Ivins.

1786 Grandfather Isaac Ivins died and left a valuable plantation, near Recklesstown [17], to grandson Samuel Ivins, which he inherited upon reaching age 21.

1786 A deed was made, dated September 18, related to the estate of Samuel Wardell, which was administered by [Sarah's brother] John Platt and Sarah Wardell. The settlement involved sale of a lot to Sarah's sister, Charity Platt. [18]

1787 Samuel Ivins, of Burlington County, ward, son of Samuel Ivins, of Burlington County, deceased, having real and personal estate, makes choice of John Platt [perhaps his uncle John Platt] as his guardian. John Platt was appointed guardian; fellowbondsman Gervas Pharo. Dated February 27.[19]

1787 Charles Jones and Mary Ivins, daughter of Samuel Ivins, deceased, of Chesterfield, Burlington County, were married on November 2, at Upper Freehold, Monmouth County. Witnessed by Sarah Wardell, and many others. [20]

1787 Sarah Platt-Ivins-Wardell and her children moved to (her son) Samuel Ivin's plantation to help him manage the household affairs. [Map, Rural Retreat in Upper Makefield Twp, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 1815(below "E" in Makefield).] Eliza Wardell (Samuel Ivins' half-sister) wrote an account of the situation [21] and a poem:

Samuel shortly fell in with an artful girl (Rickey) in Pennsylvania who, dependent on an old Aunt, readily conceived a passion for his property and the were married, of which Eliza (Wardell) thus speaks -
Two jarring souls of angry mould
The rugged and the Keen
Sampson's young foxes might as well
In bonds of sacred wedlock dwell
With fire brands tied between.
He, naturally choleric, and she fond of nothing but dress and parade kept a fair face for company and one foul enough for her husband, whom she despised as illiterate and rustick, whilst her tongue thundered confusion and her eyes flashed the most frantic rage on the most trivial occasion. In Autumn he (Samuel Ivins) brought his blazing charmer (Ann Rickey) home and my Mother (Sarah Platt-Ivins-Wardell) fled with her remaining children (five in number) before the Comet to 'Rural Retreat' for Winter Quarters.

1788 Samuel Ivins of Chesterfield, New Jersey, son of Samuel of Stafford Twp, Monmouth County, married Ann Rickey of Falls, daughter of James Rickey, deceased of Philadelphia, on November 18. Witnessed by Sarah Ivins and Aaron Ivins Jr; it is not clear which Sarah and Aaron. [22]

1789 Sarah Wardall and her children Thomas, Antony, and Elizabeth were received into membership at Upper Springfield meeting.

1790 Sarah Ivins, daughter of Samuel (deceased) and Sarah Ivins, married William Chapman at Upper Freehold, Monmouth County, New Jersey on December 16. Witnessed by Sarah Wardell, and many others. [23]

1790 Daughter Sarah Ivins married William Chapman, who purchased the mills at Crosswick's Landing.

1792 Sarah's brother John Platt purchased land, on December 12, in Upper Freehold Twp, Monmouth County, New Jersey, from John Bullock Jr and Rebecca Bullock [Samuel Wardell's daughter] of New Hanover Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. The land had previously belonged to Samuel Wardell, deceased. [24]

1793 Sarah's brother John Platt purchased land, on January 6, in Upper Freehold Twp, Monmouth County, New Jersey, that had previously belonged to Samuel Wardell, deceased, from Richard Sexton and [Samuel Wardell's daughter] Phebe Sexton of Upper Freehold Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. [25]

1793 The family moved to "Rural Retreat'.

c 1793 Son Thomas Wardell, who was "inclined to learning", studied at Trenton Academy.

1790-1795 Anthony Wardell moved out of the house to live with brother-in-law William Chapman.

before 1795 Daughter Mary Ivins married Charles Jones.

1795 The family moved to another house they owned at Jacobstown. Eliza Wardell studied arithmetic with her brother-in-law Charles Jones for a bit but returned home to study with her brother Thomas.

1797 Thomas Wardall got a certificate from Upper Springfield meeting to Chesterfield meeting on 7th month, 5th day. Sarah and daughter Elizabeth got a certificate on the same day. [26]

1797 Thomas became the overseer of the Crosswick's Crossing school when the prior overseer, Jacob Brown, was made Commander-in-Chief of the American Army. Thomas, Eliza, and Sarah Platt-Ivins-Wardell rented the house on the brow of the hill across from the Quaker Meeting House.

1800 Anthony returned home and Thomas resigned charge of the school at Crosswicks and the family removed to "Rural Retreat".

1802 The family seemed to be in intellectual and emotional turmoil. Thomas and Anthony were spending time away from home and returning morose. Eliza was falling in love (via exchanged letters) with Looe Baker. Sarah Ivins Chapman gave her the book written by Fox, concerning Quakerism. [27]

1803 Eliza Wardell was writing essays, from a feminine perspective, for local newspapers. [28]

1805 The account of the estate of Isaac Ivins [father of Samuel Ivins] named grandchildren (children of Samuel) as Samuel, Mary (wife of Chas Jones), and Sarah (wife of Wm Chapman). [29]

1805 Sarah, Thomas, Anthony, and Elizabeth Wardell, all of New Hanover Twp conveyed land to John Wardell. Dated 6 March and recorded 25 March, 1805. [30]

1805 Eliza Wardell and Looe Baker were married and set out on a trip down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Natchez.

1824 "Sarah Wardell, died Nov 14, 1824" from the Notes of Franklin Platt. Sarah's will, proved Nov 29, 1824 (1378-C) (not seen) mentions "son Samuel Ivins" and "son Thomas Wardell". The will of Sarah's spinster sister Charity Platt had a bequest to "Samuel Ivins, son of my deceased sister Sarah Wardle [sic]". [31] [32] [33]

1826 Charity Platt, of New Hanover Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey, named Samuel Ivins, son of her deceased sister Sarah Wardle, in her will, dated May 22. [34]

1828 Charity Platt (sister of Sarah Platt) bequeathed a legacy to Samuel Platt, perhaps the son of this couple. [35]

Research Notes:

c 1747 Samuel Ivins and Sarah Platt were reportedly born the same year. [36] [37]

Sarah Wardell Ivins died 11-14-1824 at age 77. [38]


Footnotes:

[1] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 22. (Marriage Records, 1665-1800) (1900), 212, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[2] New Jersey, County Marriages, 1682-1956, [FamilySearchImage], [FamilySearchRecord], [FHLCatalogFilm].

[3] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Men's Minutes, 1684-1738, 434, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[4] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Men's Minutes, 1684-1738, 436, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[5] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Men's Minutes, 1684-1738, 447, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[6] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Men's Minutes, 1684-1738, 448, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[7] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 34. (Wills and Administrations 5, 1771-1780) (1931), 268, citing Lib. 14, p 519, [InternetArchive].

[8] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Removals, Deeds, Acknowledgements, 1750-1920, Book 2, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[9] Charlotte D. Meldrum, Early Church Records of Burlington County, New Jersey, Vol. 2 (1995), 226.

[10] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 22. (Marriage Records, 1665-1800) (1900), 214, Reports 27 January, 1777, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[11] New Jersey, County Marriages, 1682-1956, [FamilySearchImage], [FamilySearchRecord].

[12] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 34. (Wills and Administrations 5, 1771-1780) (1931), 567, [InternetArchive].

[13] Elmer T. Hutchinson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 35. (Wills and Administrations 6, 1781-1785) (1939), 430, citing Lib. 25, p. 5, [InternetArchive].

[14] U.S. Quaker Meeting Records, Upper Springfield Monthly Minutes, 1707-1842, 8, date on page 10, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[15] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Records of Marriage Certificates from Upper Springfield Meeting, commencing 1783, 8, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[16] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Records of Marriage Certificates from Upper Springfield Meeting, commencing 1783, 6, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[17] Major E. M. Woodward and John Hageman, History of Burlington and Mercer Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1883), 287, Describes Recklesstown, [HathiTrust].

[18] Charles Platt Jr, Thomas Platt of Burlington, New Jersey and his Descendants (Peterborough: Richard R Smith Co, 1967), 57, of 57-8 provides a summary of a deed at Mount Holly county clerk office.

[19] Elmer T. Hutchinson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 36. (Wills and Administrations 7, 1786-1790) (1939), 124, [InternetArchive].

[20] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Records of Marriage Certificates from Upper Springfield Meeting, commencing 1783, 15, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[21] Kate Stuart Lowry, Letters of Looe and Eliza Baker from 1801 to 1821, (1924), 1-3.

[22] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Bucks County Pennsylvania, Marriages and Births, Book B, 131, [AncestryImage].

[23] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Records of Marriage Certificates from Upper Springfield Meeting, commencing 1783, 28, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[24] Charles Platt Jr, Thomas Platt of Burlington, New Jersey and his Descendants (Peterborough: Richard R Smith Co, 1967), 58, provides a summary of a deed.

[25] Charles Platt Jr, Thomas Platt of Burlington, New Jersey and his Descendants (Peterborough: Richard R Smith Co, 1967), 58, provides a summary of a deed.

[26] Charlotte D. Meldrum, Early Church Records of Burlington County, New Jersey, Vol. 3 (1995), 40.

[27] Kate Stuart Lowry, Letters of Looe and Eliza Baker from 1801 to 1821, (1924), 21.

[28] Kate Stuart Lowry, Letters of Looe and Eliza Baker from 1801 to 1821, (1924), 10.

[29] Burlington County, New Jersey, Miscellaneous Probate Papers 1778-1815, book I, FHL film, 840954, image 94, [FamilySearchImage].

[30] Virginia Alleman Brown, Abstracts of Partitions & Divisions of the New Jersey counties of Monmouth, Mercer, & Burlington (Baltimore: Clearfield, 1993), 50, citing Book A, p 190.

[31] Charles Platt Jr, Thomas Platt of Burlington, New Jersey and his Descendants (Peterborough: Richard R Smith Co, 1967), 317.

[32] Charles Platt Jr, Thomas Platt of Burlington, New Jersey and his Descendants (Peterborough: Richard R Smith Co, 1967), 21.

[33] Charles Platt Jr, Thomas Platt of Burlington, New Jersey and his Descendants (Peterborough: Richard R Smith Co, 1967), 338.

[34] New Jersey Probate Records, 1678-1980, Burlington, Will D-26, [FamilySearchImage].

[35] Burlington County New Jersey Miscellaneous Probate Papers, Book P2, image 98, of images 96-100, [FamilySearchImage].

[36] Charles Platt Jr, Thomas Platt of Burlington, New Jersey and his Descendants (Peterborough: Richard R Smith Co, 1967), 21.

[37] Charles Platt Jr, Thomas Platt of Burlington, New Jersey and his Descendants (Peterborough: Richard R Smith Co, 1967), 317.

[38] Edna Carson Burton, Bess Mogk, William A. Carson, Chuck Mogk, Family bible of Elizabeth Carson Mogk (cited by others, I have not seen any image or documentation).