Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy --- Go to Genealogy Page for Preserve Brown --- Go to Genealogy Page for Mary French

Notes for Preserve Brown and Mary French

1710 Preserve Brown, Senior (the father of this Preserve Brown), had a certificate from Chesterfield monthly meeting to Burlington monthly meeting and lived at Mansfield near Bordentown, New Jersey. Dated 2 of month 6. [1]

1724 Preserve Brown Jr., of Mansfield, and Mary French, of Mansfield, daughter of Richard French, declared their intentions of marriage. Dated 3rd day of 7th month [September] at the Chesterfield Monthly Meeting. [2] [3] [4]

1724 Preserve Brown Jr. and Mary French Jr, again declared their intentions marriage, consent of parents being had. Dated 1st day of 8th month [October] at the Chesterfield Monthly Meeting. [5]

1724 Preserve Brown Jr. and Mary French were married on 15th day 8th month. [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11]:

Now these are to certifie all whom it may concern that for the full accomplishing of their said Intentions... They the said Preserve Brown Jun'r & Mary French appeared in a public meeting of the said peole & others at their public meeting house in Chesterfield aforesaid. And the said Preserve Brown Jun'r taking the said Mary French by the hand did in a solemn manner openly declare that he took her to be his Wife promifsing through the Lords assistance to be unto her a loving & faithful husband until the Lord should by death separate them. And then and there in the said assembly the said Mary French did in like manner declare that she took the said Preserve Brown to be her husband, promising to be to him a faithful & loving wife till it should please the Lord by death to Separate them. And moreover the said Preserve Jun'r & Mary French (she according to the custom of marriage assuming the name of her husband) as a further confirmation thereof did then & there to these presents set their hands..." Witnesses - Richard French, Preserve Brown, Harmenius King, Thomas French, Richard French Jr., John King, Joseph King, Tho King, Fra King, Abraham Brown, Abraham Brown Jr., Richard Lawrence, Thomas Newbold, Thomas Johnson, Eliz Scholey, Mercy King, Sarah Murfin, Mary Ellis, Phebe Bunting, Eliza Tabtum Jr, Wm Scholey, Joshua Shreve, Thomas French Jr., Benjamin Shreve, John Abbott, John Sykes, John Black, Ro Stork, Wm Murfin, Jos Reckless.

1728 The Quaker members of the grand jury of West New Jersey, held at Burlington, including Preserve Brown (perhaps this one or his father), signed a letter to the King of England expressing support, especially with regard to the conflict against Spain. Dated May 7. [12]

1729 Thomasin Pancoast and Joshua Wright were married on April 16, at Upper Springfield meeting, Burlington County. Witnessed by Preserve Brown and Mary Brown Junior (Preserve's sister Mary was still living) and others. [13]

1729 Benjamin Shreeve and Rebecca French were married on April 23, in Upper Springfield, Burlington County. Witnessed by Preserve Brown Jr and Mary Brown and others. [14]

1729 Preserve Brown, son of Preserve Brown Jr and Mary (nee French) Brown, was born on 26 of month 6. [15] [16]

1732 Richard Brown, child of Preserve Brown and Mary Brown, was born on 10 of month 11. [17]

1732 Payment was made to Preserve Brown, Jr., from the estate of Nathaniel Field of Chesterfield Twp, Burlington County. [18]

1735 Mary Brown, child of Preserve Brown and Mary Brown, was born on 10 of month 3. [19]

1737 Sarah Brown, child of Preserve Brown and Mary Brown, was born on 2 of month 10. [20] [21]

1738 Preserve Brown was active in building the Friend's meeting house in Bordentown in 1738-41.

1741 Preserve Brown was overseer for the poor in Chesterfield Township, Burlington County. [22] [23]

1741 William Brown, child of Preserve Brown and Mary Brown, was born on 3 of month 1, 1740/41. [24]

1741 Preserve Brown Junior of Mansfield purchased land in Bordentown from Joseph Borden of Chesterfield. The land had a storehouse and adjoined Crosswicks Creek. Dated May 16. [25]

1742 Preserve Brown built and operated a mill on Doctor's Creek. [26]

1742 Preserve Brown Jr was a bondsman for the estate of William Talbart of Bordentown, Burlington County. [27]

1743 Abiah Brown, child of Preserve Brown and Mary Brown, was born on 28 of month 9. [28]

1743 Preserve Brown was overseer of the highways. [29]

1743 "Port Burlington, Aug. 11. For Boston directly, The Sloop Virgin Queen, John Hornor, Master: For Freight or Passage agree with Preserve Brown, junr. or the said Master, at Whitehill, New Jersey." [30]

1744 Preserve Brown, merchant, purchased land from Charles and Rachel Taylor, all of Bordentown. Dated March 20. The land in Chesterfield and Mansfield Twps, Burlington County, with grist mill and plantation, had been originally patented by Joshua Newbold, who bequeathed it to his son Joshua in his will dated March 1708. [31]

1744 Preserve Brown purchased 2 acres in Mansfield from Isaac and Eleanor Horner, on March 21, adjacent to the land he had purchased from Charles Taylor. The land had a run of water falling into Mill Creek. [32]

Preserve Brown was a large landholder in the area of Sand Hills. He built and operated Laurie's grist mill on Doctor's Creek, and was a very active and successful businessman.

1745 Preserve Brown (merchant), perhaps this one, was a freeholder in Mansfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey. Dated April 15. [33]

1745 The will of Richard French of Mansfield, Burlington County, dated July 24, named daughter Mary (wife of Preserved Brown), and others [34]

1745 Preserve Brown and wife and son Preserve transferred from the Chesterfield Meeting. Many Friends signed the certificate. They were "well received" at the Philadelphia Meeting. Dated 29th of 9th mo. [35] [36] Preserve Brown and his family moved to Philadelphia for a few years where he began a brewing company near Second and Vine Streets.

1745 Samuel Hazard of Philadelphia, and Preserve Brown and John Horner of West New Jersey, were listed as owners of the 40 ton "Sloop Lark", mastered by John Horner. Dated July 25. [37]

1745 An employee of Preserve Brown drowned [38]:

Philadelphia - On the 9th Instant George Steel, Maltster and Brewer to Mr. Preserve Brown, in Bordenstown, going thither from this Place in a Shallop, unfortunately fell over board, and was drowned.

1746 "John Reynell and Israel Pemberton, Jun'r ... signed the Deed to Preserve Brown for the 25 feet Bank & Water Lott formerly given to this Meeting [Philadelphia] by our worthy Friend George Fox. ..." Dated 29th of sixth month. The deed was reviewed in 1753. [39] [40]

1746 Mary (nee French) Brown died and was buried at the Friend's burying ground on fourth and Arch streets in Philadelphia. [41] [42] Preserve Brown moved back to Bordentown.

1747 Preserve Brown applied for a certificate on account of marriage, to Chester Monthly Meeting. Dated 28th of sixth month. [43]

1747 The Chesterfield (Burlington County) Friends' Monthly Meeting Marriage recorded the marriage of Preserve Brown, of Philadelphia, and Mary Sykes, of Chesterfield, daughter of John and Joanna, at Upper Springfield, Burlington County. Witnesses Thomas, John, Richard (perhaps Preserve's son by his first marriage) and Sarah Brown (perhaps Preserve's daughter), John, Joanna, Anthony, Benjamin, Samuel and Joanna Sykes, Michael Newbold and John Kirkbride, Jr., and others. Dated 21st of 8th month. [44] [45] [46] [47] Israel Pemberton and John Smith were comissioned to draw the certificate. [48] [49]

1747-1759 There are several entries for Preserve Brown in the New Jersey records. Since Preserve had a son named Preserve, who lived in New Jersey, they are not distinguished here: 1747 Philadelphia, 1755 Nottingham, 1756 two are listed in Nottingham, 1758 two are listed in Nottingham, 1759 in Nottingham. [50]

1748 "To be sold by Preserve Brown, at the upper end of Water street, Seasoned pine and cedar board, and oak scantling, pickled shadd by the barrel, and a neat assortment of European goods. And by his son Preserve, near the upper end of Second street, Good Four penny Beer, and seasoned boards. N.B. The above named Browns buy oats." [51]

1749 Preserve Brown prepared a paper acknowledging his breach of discipline in marriage and asked to be continued under the care of Friends.

1749 Young Preserve Brown arranged a subscription from John Smith. Dated 11th month, 13th (7th day). [52]

1750 Preserve Brown's malt house burned down:

This Morning, about One a Clock, a Fire broke out in the Malt house of Mr. Preserve Brown, junior, in the upper End of Second street, which intirely consumed the same, together with his Dwelling house and Brew house. [53] [54]

This great fire destroyed Preserve's brewhouses, a devastating economic blow. A subscription was started on his behalf and secured about 200 pounds for Preserve Brown. Israel Pemberton, who raised funds for the subscription wrote "I met with some very free to give and others very skillful in distinctions to excuse themselves. [55]

Forty years later, a fire broke out in a brew pub at the same site on Vine St between 2nd and 3rd Streets. [56]

1751 Preserve Brown moved back to Burlington County, New Jersey. "Preserve Brown, being about to return within the compass of Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, requested a certificate for himself and wife." [57]. He was an elder and clerk for the Chesterfield Monthly Meeting and a frequent representative at quarterly meetings.

1752 The malt house in Philadelphia was sold:

By virtue of his majesty writ of Venditioni Exponas, to me directed, on Thursday, the 30th instant, at three a clock in the afternoon, on the premises, will be exposed to sale, by publick vendue, a certain brew house and utensils, with the appurtenances, situate, lying and being in the Northern Liberties of this city, late the property of Preserve Brown, junior, seized and taken in execution as the suit of Preserve Brown, senior. Isaac Griffitts, late sheriff. [58]

By virtue of his majesty writ of Fieri Facias, to the sheriff of Philadelphia county directed, on Thursday, the 21st inst. at 3 a clock in the afternoon, will be sold, by public vendue, at the house of John Beidler [?], in the Northern Liberties of the city of Philadelphia, A brew house, situate in Wood street, in the said Northern Liberties, together with sundry utensils belonging to the said brew house, late the property of Preserve Brown, the younger, seized and taken in execution, at the suit of Preserve Brown, the elder, by Isaac Griffitts, late sheriff.". [59]

1752 Other land at Vine and Second in Philadelphia, was advertised for sale [60] [61] [62] [63]:

To be Sold, or Lett, A Plantation, situate in the Northern Liberties, about three miles from Philadelphia, containing 142 acres of land, 120 cleared, of which 40 acres is in orchard, set out with grafted fruit, about five acres of meadow, and more may be made, with a new brick house on it, 30 feet long, and 16 feet wide, and a cellar under the whole, being very fit for a gardiner, or gentlemanseat, there being a fine prospect from it. Likewise a large convenient brew house, and malt house, in said Northern Liberties, with malt mill, still, and all other conveniences for the business, contrived so, that there need be no lading by hand, but the water, wort and beer carried from vessel to vessel by pumps and brass cocks, until it is got into the barrel; part of the lot joins on Vine street, and the whole is a little above Second street, and will be lett, or sold, on easy terms of payment. Any person inclining to purchase or rent, may apply to Preserve Brown, living at his mill, in Nottingham township, Burlington county, or to Thomas Hill, in Philadelphia, and be further informed.

1753 Preserve Brown, of Nottingham, sold two tracts in Monmouth County to Joshua Horner. Dated September 20. Witnessed by John Parker, Joseph Scholey, and Mary Brown. The land had been surveyed for Preserve Brown (Survey E-195). [64]

1753 The Nottingham town meeting was held near the home of Preserve Brown. Preserve Brown served as town clerk until his death. [65]

1754 A tax list in Mulberry Ward, Philadelphia listed Brown, Preserve's Est.x forw.x John Jones Rated, £30. Nathaniel Brown, blacksmith, and Alexander Brown, plaisterer, were also listed. [66]

1754 The Nottingham town meeting was held at the home of Preserve Brown. Preserve Brown was the town clerk. [67]

1754 Preserve Brown and Mary Brown witnessed the will, dated October 1, of widow Sarah Murfin in Nottingham Twp in Burlington County. [68]

1754 "The meeting ... recommends Sammuell Satterthwaite, Preserve Brown, and William Lawrie to sit in the Meeting of Ministers and Elders." Dated 2 of 5th month, at the Chesterfield meeting. [69]

1755 Preserve Brown, perhaps this one, witnessed the will of Robert Taylor, dated 30 Dec 1755 in Chesterfield, Burlington County. [70]

1756 John Jones Jr. and Mary Brown, daughter of Preserve Brown and Mary (French), were married on 12th of 8th month, at Chesterfield. Witnessed by Preserve and Mary Brown, and others. [71]

1756 Preserve Brown was paid by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, for 40 and then for 20 barrels of pork. Dated In June. [72]

1756 Joseph Schooley and Sarah Brown, daughter of Preserve Brown, were married on 11th, 11th month, at the Chesterfield Quaker Monthly Meeting. Witnessed by Preserve and Mary Brown and others. [73]

1756 Preserve Brown's estate, for which John Jones is rated, was taxed in the Mulberry Ward, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [74]

1755-1759 Preserve Brown appeared in the records for Nottingham Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. [75]

1757 Preserve Brown offered land for sale [76]:

To be sold or leased on Ground rent, with Liberty of purchasing, by Preserve Brown, two Lots of Land, in the Northern Liberties, about three Miles from Philadelphia; one containing 22 Acres, or thereabouts; bounded on the North with the Road that leaves from Frankford to Germantown; on the West by Benjamin Mason Land; on the South by Robert Waln Land; and on the East by the other Lands of Preserve Brown; and has a young Orchard on it. The other Lot contains about 48 Acres, and is bounded on the North by the said Road; on the West by the other Lands of the said Preserve Brown; on the South by Robert Waln Land; and Easterly by a Road leading from Philadelphia to the above said Road. The Lots will be sold together, or in small Parcel, as best suits the Purchasers or Lessors. They are very pleasantly situated for Country Seats or Gardiners, there being a fine Prospect from them over Delaware River.

Likewise a large convenient Brewhouse and Malthouse, in the said Northern Liberties, fronting Wood street; part of the Lot extends to Vine street, and is a little above Second street, being the most convenient Place for purchasing the Barley that comes in at that End of the City of Philadelphia; and at present there is a large Stroke of Brewing carried on in it by a Person, whose Lease will expire in two Years. Any Person inclining to purchase or lease, may apply to John Jones, in Vine street, Philadelphia, or also Preserve Brown, at his Mill in Nottingham, in New Jersey, and know the Terms. Preserve Brown.

1758 On 1 January, Preserve Brown, and a committee of public spirited citizens, became a charter member of the "Library Company of Burlington" to purchase a "collection of useful books, in order to erect a library, for the advancement of knowledge and literature in the city of Burlington". [77] This is the oldest continuously operated library in New Jersey, the seventh oldest in the country [78] [79] "Preserve Brown, paid his dues in books rather than cash. Members might borrow books for one to four weeks, or six weeks for those who were not residents of the city. Each borrower was required to leave his note for the value of the book ...". [80]

1758 "Preserve Brown desires to be excused from being clark of this meeting on account of his hardness of hearing, which the meeting consents to and appoints able Midleton Clark of the meeting in his sted." [81] [82]

1758 "Preserve Brown brought one hundred & fifty books to this meeting to be distributed to particular meetings belonging to this meeting." At the very same meeting, the report of the overseers suggested rules including "3) In plainness of speech behaviour & apparel some among us are still too remiss, but endeavors are used to bring up those under our care in Reading the Holy Scriptures and to restrain them from reading Pernicious Books, but the corrupt conversation of the World is too Prevalent among us, tho' guarded by the faithful." Dated 2 of 11th month, at the Chesterfield meeting. [83]

1758 Preserve Brown of Nottingham had letters at the post office of Trenton (not picked up). Notice dated August 10. [84]

1759 Preserve Brown, perhaps this one or his son, witnessed the marriage, on 15th day, 2nd month, of Joseph Borden and Rebekah Middleton at Chesterfield, Burlington County. [85]

1759 Preserve Brown, perhaps this one or his son, was named a freeholder and as clerk of Nottingham at the town meeting. Dated the 11th of month 3. [86]

1759 The will of Preserve Brown, a shopkeeper, was dated June 13, 1759 in Nottingham, Burlington County, New Jersey and named his wife Mary and children Abia, Richard, William, Mary Jones, and Sarah Scholy. Land in Nottingham Township, bought of William Morris, on S. E. side of the Millpond and Dector's Creek; also adjoining William Murfin on the road from Crosswicks to Trenton; three houses and lot on Vine Street, next to Second Street, Philadelphia; another house and lot next to the preceding; houses and lots in Chesterfield, said County; also personal property. Executors: sons Richard and William, and son-in-law, John Jones. Witnesses: Samuel Redford, James White, John Brown, Peter Dahlman. Proved Dec. 11, 1760. [87] [88] [89]

1759 "Persons indebted to estate of Preserve Brown, late of Nottingham, deceased, to pay to Richard Brown and John Jones, executors" Dated June 26. [90]

1760 On 22 of month 5, Preserve Brown, son of Preserve and Mary Brown, died. [91]

1760 Inventory of personal estate, £5835.10.1, incl. a bookcase and books, £2.5; a clock, £2.15; 4 maps, £1.7.6; 6 large silver table spoons, £6; 6 teaspoons; 2 pr. of teatongs; shopgoods, £667.8.11; bills and bonds, £1,351.10.2; book debts, £2,795.12.5; made by William Murfin and Samuel Stevenson. Execution of his will involved the sale of "a convenient Malt and Brew-house, situate in the Northern Liberties, between Second and Third steets, just above Vine-Street..." Dated June 2. [92]

1757-60 Widow Brown, perhaps the widow of Preserve, lived at Sassafras, between Front and Second Streets in Philadelphia. Nathaniel Brown and William Brown Jr were listed on the same street. [93]

1760 A sale from the late estate of Preserve Brown was announced [94]:

To be Sold by Preserve Brown, A convenient Brew house and Malt house, situate between Second and Third street, and just above Vine street, Philadelphia. For Terms and Title enquire of John Jones, living in Front street, a little above William Callenderor Preserve Brown, at his Mills, near Croswicks, in New Jersey. N.B. To be sold by John Jones, about 40 Acres of cleared Land, situate in the Northern LIberties, and adjoining to Thomas LawrenceLand, upon the Road that leads from Frankfort to Germantown, for further Particulars enquire as above.

1760 A notice was published concerning the estate of Preserve Brown [95] [96]:

All Persons indebted to the Estate of Preserve Brown, late of Nottingham, in West New Jersey, deceased, are desired to pay, and those who have any Demands against said Estate, are desired to bring in their Accounts, that they may be adjusted and paid by Richard Brown, at the late Dwelling house of said Preserve Brown, and John Jones, of Philadelphia, Executors. To be sold, a convenient Malt and Brew house, situate in the Northern Liberties, between Second and Third streets, just above Vine street; for Title and Terms of Sale, enquire of said Executors.

1761 A sale from the late estate of Preserve Brown was announced [97]:

By Virtue of a Writ to me directed, will be exposed to publick Sale, about 4 o'Clock, on the 22d Day of June inst. at the house where Thomas Harper lately lived, in Kensington, A Lot or Piece of Ground, situate in Kensington, in the North Liberty Township, bounded by the Grounds of John Ogborn, John Chevalier, and by Hanover street, containing in Breadth on said Street 100 Feet, and in Length or Depth 425 Feet 8 Inches; subject to a Groundrent to Alexander and Wife of Three Pounds per Annum; late the Estate of Preserve Brown, deceased; taken in Execution by Samuel Morris, Sheriff.

1766 A sale from the late estate of Preserve Brown was announced [98]:

By Virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas to me directed, will be sold by public Vendue, on Friday, the 13th day of June next, at the London Coffee House, in the city of Philadelphia, at seven oin the evening, a certain two story brick messuage or tenement, and lot or piece of ground thereunto belonging, situate on the south side of Vine street, in the city of Philadelphia, containing in front on the said street 16 feet 6 inches and in length or depth 51 feet; bounded northward with Vine street foresaid, eastward with ground now or late of Preserve Brown, southward with John Dentonlot, and westward with ground late of Patrick Flood; subject to a ground rent of Three Pounds Six Shillings currency per annum; late the estate of John Jones, seized and taken in execution by William Parr, Sheriff.

1768 A sale from the late estate of Preserve Brown was announced [99]:

By virtue of a writ to me directed, will be exposed to public sale, on Monday, the 7th of November, at 5 in the afternoon, at the London Coffee house, four certain brick messuages, and lots of ground, situate on the south side of Vine street, the whole containing in breadth 54 and a half feet, and in depth 51 feet; bounded northward with Vine street aforesaid; eastward with a lot late of John Hyatt, southward with ground late of John Denton, and westward with a lot late the James Parrock, the westermost part of which being 16 feet and a half in breadth, and is subject to a groundrent of Three Pounds Six Shillings Pennsylvania currency per annum; late the estate of Preserve Brown deceased; seized and taken in execution by Joseph Redman, Sheriff.

1780 Isaac Thorn and Mary Schooley were married on 12 of month 10. Witnessed by Mary Brown and many others. [100]

1782 Mary Brown was named as a member of the Upper Springfield monthly meeting. [101]

1783 Mary Brown died on January 8. Mary was born in 1707 and was a sister of Anthony Sykes. [102] [103]

1783 The will of Mary Brown, of Chesterfield Township, Burlington County was dated on August 28. To Mary Sykes, daughter of Samuel Sykes, £20, and the money belonging to me from the sale of that plantation which my father left to be sold, in Hunterdon County, on account of my brother, Samuel, which is my due. To Edith Earl, 2 table spoons, and the goods that are at her house. To Mary Sykes, daughter of Anthony, various goods. To Cathrine Sykes, goods. To Anne Brooks, £10. To Mary Thorn, daughter of Joseph and Sarah Schooley, goods. To Catharine Emley, £5. To Thomas Sykes, son of Anthony, that land near Bordentown, which I bought of John Edwards. To William Brown and Abiah Brown, the money in said Abiah's hand, on account of their father's estate. To Edith Earl, Mary Sykes and Catherine Sykes, daughters of Anthony Sykes the rest of estate. Executors cousins, Samuel Sykes and Thomas Earl, Jr. Witnesses: Joseph Newbold, Achsah Warren, Robert Emley. Proved Jan. 28, 1783. [104]

1784 Inventory, £944.18.6, made by Tanton Earl and Thomas Earl. Dated January 19. The date of proof was evidently listed as 1783 by mistake by the Clerk, and should have been 1784. [105]

A biosketch reported [106]:

Preserve Brown, Jr., of Mansfield township, Burlington county, was a prominent member of the Society of Friends, and helped to build the Meeting House at Bordentown, where he lies buried, being one of the few Friends over whom a tombstone was erected at that early period [This source is wrong and confuses the generations, as other researchers have done. This was the grave marker of Preserve Brown Sr, who died 1644, not of Preserve Brown Jr]. He built and operated a mill on Doctor's Creek; removed to Philadelphia, 1745, and engaged in business there for a few years, but, his wife [Mary French] dying, returned to Bordentown, where he died May 23, 1760. His son, William, who married Rebecca, sister to Gov. Jones, of Delaware, and cousin to Gen. John Cadwalader, was a large shipping merchant in Philadelphia, but lost his ships by capture during the Revolution. His scrupulous honesty [masculine pronouns now apparently refer to Preserve Brown, the third] earned for him the sobriquet of the "Honest Quaker." After the loss of his ships, he engaged in the manufacture of ship-biscuits, etc., and so well-known was his brand, that at his death it was sold for 500 pounds. During the British occupation of the city, William Brown received a severe sword wound on the head for refusing to doff his hat to a British officer, from which he never entirely recovered. Preserve Brown Jr.'s son Abiah married Margaret Monroe, cousin of President James Monroe, and his daughter Hannah married William de la Montaigne, her bridesmaids being Mrs. Dundas, and Dolly Payne, afterwards wife of President James Madison.

Research Notes:

The following do not agree with the death dates for either generation of Preserve Brown, Jr.:

1758 Preserve Brown Jr was buried (9-1-1758) at the Friends Burial Grounds in Philadelphia, Arch Street Meeting. 1758 Preserve Brown Jr died. [107]

1763 On 29 of 8 month, plans were made to give testimony at the next yearly meeting about the decease of Preserve Brown, and others. [108]

Mary's birthdate was reported as 1698. Thus, Sarah Scattergood, Richard's first wife, may be her mother.

A biosketch of the parents of Mary Sykes has been published. [109]

Some researchers have named Margaret Abia Brown [110], spouse of Nathan Gibbons, as the child born 1743 named Abiah. We seek further evidence to clarify the identity of this child.


Footnotes:

[1] Howard Barclay French, Genealogy of the Descendants of Thomas French, Volume 1 (1909), 206, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[2] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Men's Minutes, 1684-1738, 210, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[3] Lewis D. Cook, "Marriage Intentions, 1685-1730, Burlington County, New Jersey," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 53 (1965), 129-32, at 131.

[4] "Marriages at Chesterfield, New Jersey, 1685-1730," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 9 (1885), 347-352, at 351, [GoogleBooks].

[5] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Men's Minutes, 1684-1738, 211, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[6] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724, 47, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[7] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724, 90, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[8] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Marriages, Births, Deaths, and Marriage Intentions (from the Minutes), Certificates of Removal 1684-1847 (NJ/B2F:L), [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[9] Howard Barclay French, Genealogy of the Descendants of Thomas French, Volume 1 (1909), 210, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[10] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 22. (Marriage Records, 1665-1800) (1900), 652, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[11] "Marriages at Chesterfield, New Jersey, 1685-1730," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 9 (1885), 347-352, at 351, [GoogleBooks].

[12] William A. Whitehead, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 5. (Administration 1720-1737) (1882), 187, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[13] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Burlington Monthly Meeting, Minutes, 1677-1777 (includes many different types of records), 226, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[14] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Burlington Monthly Meeting, Minutes, 1677-1777 (includes many different types of records), 223, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[15] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Untitled: Chesterfield Births and Deaths, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[16] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Marriages, Births, Deaths, and Marriage Intentions (from the Minutes), Certificates of Removal 1684-1847 (NJ/B2F:L), [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[17] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Untitled: Chesterfield Births and Deaths, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[18] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 30. (Wills and Administrations 2, 1730-1750) (1918), 176, [GoogleBooks], [HathiTrust].

[19] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Untitled: Chesterfield Births and Deaths, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[20] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Untitled: Chesterfield Births and Deaths, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[21] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Marriages, Births, Deaths, and Marriage Intentions (from the Minutes), Certificates of Removal 1684-1847 (NJ/B2F:L), [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[22] Major E. M. Woodward and John Hageman, History of Burlington and Mercer Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1883), 281, left column, [HathiTrust].

[23] Major E. M. Woodward and John Hageman, History of Burlington and Mercer Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1883), 459, left column, [HathiTrust].

[24] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Untitled: Chesterfield Births and Deaths, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[25] Colonial Conveyances East & West New Jersey. Deed (Book-Page), HH-333.

[26] John W. Jordan, Colonial Families of Philadelphia, Vol. 1 (New York: Lewis Publishing Company, 1911), 842, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[27] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 30. (Wills and Administrations 2, 1730-1750) (1918), 470, [GoogleBooks], [HathiTrust].

[28] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Untitled: Chesterfield Births and Deaths, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[29] Major E. M. Woodward and John Hageman, History of Burlington and Mercer Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1883), 459, left column, [HathiTrust].

[30] Newspaper, Pennsylvania Gazette (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), August 11, 1743.

[31] Colonial Conveyances East & West New Jersey. Deed (Book-Page), HH-337.

[32] Colonial Conveyances East & West New Jersey. Deed (Book-Page), HH-341.

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