Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy --- Go to Genealogy Page for Samuel Schooley --- Go to Genealogy Page for Avis Holloway

Notes for Samuel Schooley and Avis Holloway

1699 Samuel Scholy, son of Thomas and Sarah Scholy, was born on February 25 [25 of month 12 1698/99], in Chesterfield Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

1706 Avis Holloway was born on 2nd of 9th month 1706 at Burlington County, New Jersey. [7] The Holloways lived also at Chesterfield Twp as early as 1708, or years before that. [8] [9] [10]

1716 Avis Holloway received £20 at age 18 when her father, John Holloway, died. [11] [12]

1717 Samuel Danford, of Burlington county, and Mary Wright [likely Mary Schooley, widow of Joseph Wright] married on November 5, at Chesterfield. Witnessed by Samuel Scholey [likely first cousin to Mary Scholey] and others. [13]

1724 Samuel Schooley was the executor of the will of his father, Thomas Scholey Sr. His father's will included a directive to sell a tract of land described as "three hundred and fifty acres I purchased of Thomas Stevenson." As such, executor Samuel, his mother, and brother Thomas, Jr., owned and sold lands near Draketown in Morris County, New Jersey. [14] [15] [16] [17] [18]

1725 Samuel Schooley and Avis Holloway declared to the Chesterfield meeting, on 6 of month 3, their intent to marry. [19]

1725 Avis Holloway, of Chesterfield, daughter of John and Mary Pharo Holloway, and Samuel Schooley, of Chesterfield, son of Thomas Schooley and Sarah Parker, were married on May 27, in Chesterfield Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. The marriage record reports [20] [21] [22] [23]:

Whereas, Samuel Schooley of Chesterfield and Western Division of New Jersey, and Avis Holloway, of the same place, having declared before several Monthly Meetings, of the people called Quakers, at Chesterfield, in the county of Burlington, aforesaid, according to the good order used among them whose proceedings therein after deliberate consideration thereof, and having consent of parents and relations concerned, nothing appearing to obstruct, were approved of by said Meeting. Mary Holloway was the first witness to sign the certificate and among other names were George Holloway and James Holloway. "Now these are to Certifie all to whom it may concern, that for the full accomplishment of their said intentions this twenty-seventh day of the third month, in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Twenty-five. They, the said Samuel Scholey and Avis Holloway appeared at a public meeting of the said people, and others at their public meeting house in Chesterfield, aforesaid. And the said Samuel Scholey taking the said Avis Holloway by the hand did in a solemn manner openly declare that he took her to be his wife, promising through the Lord's assistance, to be to her a loving and faithful husband until the Lord should please by death to separate them. And, moreover, the said Samuel Scholey and Avis Holloway (she according to the custom of marriage, assuming the name of her husband) as a further confirmation thereof, did then and there to these presents set their hands. And we whose name are hereunto subscribed, being among others present at the solemnization of the said marriage and subscription in like manner aforesaid as witnesses hereunto have also to these presents set our names, the day and year above written.

Samuel Scholy--Avis Scholey.

Witnesses: Mary Holloway, Sarah Scholey, Thomas Scholey, James Farrow [Pharo], John Scholey, Samuel Shinn, Sarah Shinn, Elizabeth Scholey, Hannah Scholey, Mathew Champion, Mary Smith, Wm. Murfin, Sarah Marland, Daniel Smith Jr, Richard Lawrence, Rebecca Cowgill, Jane Cowgill, Sarah Taylor, John Taylor, William Taylor, Nathan Smith, Rachel Horner, George Holloway, James Holloway, Richard French, John Tantum, John Cheshire, John Sykes, John Abbott, Ralph Cowgill, John Bunting, Wm. Wood, Eliz. Watson, Alice Bunting, Mary Sykes, Hannah Sykes, Benj. Busson, Isaac Cowgill, Robert Taylor, and Robert Murfin.

1726 Early in the year, presumably before he moved north to the new settlement at Bethlehem, Samuel Schooley sold one-half of the tract of land of the old homestead of his father in Chesterfield Twp to William Wood of Chesterfield. He had inherited one hundred and eleven acres of the homestead. He conveyed title to Wm. Wood for one-half of same. The Deed recites that, "Thomas Scholey, yeoman, deceased, father of said Samuel, by will bequeathed to Samuel, one-hundred and eleven acres, being part of the Plantation whereon Thomas Scholey lived at the time of his death. [24] Samuel Scholey continued to own the remainder of this tract of 350 or more acres from 1726 to 1745, when as his Deed expresses it, on the "22d. day of the month called April" Samuel Scholey, yeoman, of Bethlehem, Hunterdon County, Province of New Jersey, and his wife Avis, sold a "certain Plantation containing 190 acres" to William Henn, of Lebanon in said county. The next day a "Release" was passed between same parties for "190 acres, being the remainder of the 350 acres which Isaac DeCow, of Burlington, by Indenture, the 11th. of January, Anno. Dom. 1726, did grant to Samuel Scholey and his heirs and assigns in fee." [25] [26]

1726 Samuel and Avis Schooley were the Grantees in a deed from Isaac DeCow conveying to them the title to the same 350 acres of the Stevenson tract that father Thomas Schooley had originally purchased from Thomas Stevenson in 1714. The deed was dated January 11, about the time that they moved to the new settlement at Bethlehem. [27] [28] [29] [30] Public records in the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton confirmed the fact that the name of Schooley was given to the hills or mountains, because the first purchase there was made by Thomas Schooley, or Scholey, very soon after Stevenson acquired the lands. This tract of 350 acres or more, Thomas, by proviso in his will, directed to be sold, but in 1726 a few years after such sale was consummated, the same lands were again owned by a Schooley, being bought that year by Samuel, his son. These earliest locations and ownerships by Thomas and his son, Samuel, of lands on the mountains seem to determine definitely that the name, Schooley's Mountains, was given to that section because of them. Samuel's house was in the southwest part of Morris County "by the mineral springs".

1727 Daughter Asenath Schooley was born in 1744. She married John Simcock, Jr., of Pennsylvania, at Bethlehem, NJ. They first lived in Pennsylvania, and moved to New Jersey in 1746, and had three children.

1728 Daughter Ann Schooley was born on June 29. She married Samuel Lundy, in 1751, at Hardwick. Samuel was later known as Judge Lundy. He was a son of Richard Lundy. Samuel and Ann were both of Hardwick.

1729 Samuel's brothers moved to the area about the same time. Thomas Scholey, Jr. became the owner of a large tract of land on Schooley's Mountains. Thomas sold the land to William Pew in 1733 and moved back south to Burlington County. William moved to Morris county and then further north to Sussex Co. William Scholey, son of Thomas, Sr., owned lands near Draketown, on the mountains.

1729 Samuel Schooley and others request permission to hold meetings at Bethlehem (Kingwood), now Quakertown. [31] [32] [33]

1729 Samuel Schooley purchased a warrant on November 1, for 136 acres near Stephensburg, Morris County, New Jersey. [34] [35] [36]

1729 Samuel Schooley was an active Quaker and he and others in the area made application to the Chesterfield meeting, and received permission to meet at one of their homes each first day of the week since they were settled "remote from Friends". The Chesterfield Meetings have the following minutes: "Our Friends Thomas, Williams and Samuel Schooley, and others, made application to this Meeting, that, whereas, their settlement being remote from Friends they request Friends approbation and consent to meet together at one of their houses every First Day of the week to worship God." The request was granted on the 10th day of the 4th month. [perhaps the beginning of the Bethlehem (later Kingwood) Monthly Meeting] [37]

1729 Samuel Schooley was involved in construction of a meeting house at Hardwick, in Sussex County, New Jersey. [38]

1730 The early Quakers of the Hardwick Meeting, who who settled before 1730 on the wide and untimbered plain of Bethlehem in Lebanon Twp of Hunterdon County, included the Schooley family, along with Lundy, Willson, Brotherton, Willets, Shotwell, Dyer, Buckley, Adams, Jacob Doughty, Stevenson, King, Rockhill, Emley, Large, Williams, and John and William Coats from Chesterfield in Burlington County, New Jersey and from Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

1730 Samuel Schooley was named in the May term Minutes of the Common Pleas Court, in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, with a note "Sheriff to bring in ye body" [a personal appearance was required]. [39]

1730 Samuel Schooley and Francis Costigine assignee of Jn'o Dageworthy were named in the August term Minutes of the Common Pleas Court, in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, regardiing a debt of £27. [40]

1732 Samuel Schooley, of "Nutown" [Newton] sold to George Holloway, his brother-in-law, on June 1, 130 acres of land situated in Hunterdon county on a ridge of little hills lying between the river or creek called Muskenobcong, and the south branch of the "Raritan River." This was about the time Schooley and Holloway were living on Schooley's Mountains. These mountains lie between the Musconetcong River on the west, and on the south branch of the Raritan River. [41]

1732 Son Joseph was born on November 19. Joseph married Sarah Brown, daughter of Preserve Brown, in 1755, at Chesterfield.

1732 Son James was born in 1765. James married Margaret.

1733 Samuel Schooley sold 136 acres [1729 purchase] near Stephensburg, Morris County, New Jersey to William Pew, on March 1. [42] [43]

1733 Son Benjamin was born on April 24. Benjamin married Martha Lundy, daughter of Richard Lundy, sister of Samuel Lundy, in 1755, at Hardwick.

1733 Benjamin Canby and Samuel Scooly were named in the October term minutes of the Hunterdon County Court of Common Pleas regarding a debt of £4.4.2. [44]

1734 Benjamin Canby and Samuel Scooly were named in the February 1733/34 term minutes of the Hunterdon County Court of Common Pleas. [45]

1734 John Dagworthy was named with Samuel Scooly, William Scooly Junr & Thomas Howell, in the February 1733/34 term minutes of the Hunterdon County Court of Common Pleas, regarding a debt of £89.1.2. [46]

1734 An election was held on March 17 for Lebanon Twp, and Samuel Schooley and Holloway were elected as Freeholders. Samuel Schooley and George Malloat were elected as Overseers of the Poor. [47] [48]

1734 An original survey was made for Samuel Scholey by Joseph DeCow, on April 26, which covered a large tract of land on the mountains near his other holdings.

1736 Daughter Rachel was born and in 1755 she married Josiah Dyer, Jr., son of Josiah, of Plumstead, Pennsylvania. [49]

1739 Jehoaden was born and in 1758 married Ebenezer Willson, son of Robert Willson and Mary Lundy Willson. [50]

1741 Samuel Schooley, of Lebanon Twp, was named as a freeholder in Hunterdon County, New Jersey for the purpose of selecting a jury. [51] [52]

1743 Son Samuel was born on February 16, and in 1766 he married Margaret Brown Gibbon, widow of Nathan Gibbon, in Pennsylvania; later, in 1770, he married Elizabeth Willson, of Warren County, New Jersey.

1744 John Simcock, Samuel's son-in-law, was appointed first recorder for the Quaker meeting. He had to be a good pen maker and mender. He used a goose quill for writing and had to provide paper, pumice, pen, ink, knife, horn, rule, plummet, wax, and sand. [53]

1745 Samuel Schooley, yeoman of Bethlehem, Hunterdon County, New Jersey and wife Avis sold, on April 22, the remaining 190 acres, in Morris County, of the original 350 acre tract [1726 purchase] to William Henn, of Lebanon, for 150 pounds. [54] [55] [56] [57] [58] [59]

1745 There was a migration of Quakers to Great Meadows of Sussex County and by 1752 the Quaker meeting at the Great Meadows was known as Hardwick. [60]

1749 Samuel Schooley and others were appointed by the Kingwood Meeting to pay religious visits to the families of Friends belonging to the Hardwick Branch. Samuel and Avis and their children, probably including Mrs. Asenath Simcock and her family, established a new home in the township of Hardwick, then in Morris County. [61]

1751 Samuel Schooley was described in land Deeds as a resident of Hardwick. In that year his daughter Ann married Samuel Lundy. Both Ann and Samuel Lundy were recorded as "of Hardwick." A deed dated 12th of March, 1751 reported: "in which the grantors are Thomas Penn, and Richard Penn, Esquires, and the grantees are Samuel Schooley and Samuel Willson, Jr., Joseph Willets and Joseph Lundy, all of Hardwick township, Morris Co, Province of West Jersey, yeomen". [62] This Deed conveyed the title to a tract of land of 1250 acres lying in the township of Hardwick. [63]

1753 Avis was named as the wife of Samuel Scholey in the will of James Pharo, perhaps her uncle. [64] [65]

1755-1760 Samuel and Avis Schooley witnessed the marriage of son Benjamin Schooley and Martha Lundy at Hardwick Meeting.

1756 Samuel and Avis Schooley were among the first Elders of the Hardwick Meeting [66]. The records of Bethlehem Meetings were kept at Chesterfield until 1744, then Kingwood became a Monthly Meeting and kept records for Kingwood, Hardwick, and Mendham until 1797 for the Friends. Samuel and his brother-in-law, Holloway, were members of the Board of Freeholders from Lebanon township, Hunterdon Co.

1758 Samuel Schooley agreed to procure materials to build a sawmill in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, for John Stevens and James Parker. [67]

1760 There were weddings of two children of brother William Schooley on November 27. William Schooley Jr and Elizabeth Dell, were married in Woodbridge, New Jersey. Jacob Bonnell and Mary Schooley both of Mendham, were married at Mendham, Morris County, Witnessed by Samuel, Avis, James, and Samuel (Jr) Schooley and others. [68].

1761 Samuel Scholey died intestate at his home in Sussex county, NJ, aged over 63 years. His death was also reported at Hardwick, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. "Samuel Schooley was born in the year 1697, of parents who were members of the Society of Friends and early settlers. He was educated with care. He was cheerful and pleasant in conversation, and of a sound and deep judgment, well grounded in the principles of truth. Although it was his lot to live mostly remote from Friends Meetings, amongst peoples of other societies, yet, the education of his children became his care and concern." [69] [70]

1761 Samuel died on February 8, at Mendham, Woodbridge Monthly Meeting, Morris County, New Jersey. A biosketch reports [71]:

Samuel Schooley was born in the upper part of the province of East Jersey, in the year 1697, of parents who were members of the Society of Friends, and early settlers in that neighbourhood. He was educated with care, and the labours of his parents were blessed to him, through the visitations of the Lord's Holy Spirit, and his submission thereto. Of him his memorial states, "He was a man of an innocent, inoffensive conduct, cheerful and pleasant in conversation, of a sound and deep judgment, well grounded in the principles of Truth. Although it was his lot to live mostly remote from Friends meetings, amongst people of other societies, yet the education of his children became his care and concern, early to impress on their tender minds the principles of Truth, both by example and precept. The happy effect of this, through the blessing of the Almighty, he had to behold in some of his children, who laid down their heads, we have cause to believe, in peace with the Almighty, and in unity with their brethren, some time before their parent, who faithfully discharged the trust reposed in him on that important occasion.

1761 Samuel was buried in "The Burying Ground of the Hardwick Monthly Meeting of Friends" which was used from 1735 to 1920. The cemetery is beside the road westward from Allamuchy to Johnsonburg, and is now enclosed by a stone wall. An obituary for Samuel Schooley reported [72]:

Samuel Schooley was held in much esteem, as an elder of Kingwood Monthly Meeting, discharging his duty therein, and over the flock of Christ as a father in the Truth. His memorial thus closes, "he delighted much in the company of his Friends, and was well beloved by them and others. We have good reason to believe he is gone to enjoy that rest which is prepared for those who faithfully hold out to the end." He departed this life at Mendham within limits of Woodbridge Monthly Meeting month 8th 1761 being nearly 64 years old.

1761 Avis and her son Benjamin lived near the place named Stillwater, along the Paulins Kill River, southwest of Newton.

1763 The Kingwood Monthly Meeting allowed Friends in Paulins Kill River to hold the winter monthly meeting at the home of Avee (Avis) Schooley and her son Benjamin Schooley in Stillwater. [73]

1765 The name of Avis Schooley was mentioned in a Deed to some lands as a "widow." An Indenture, dated the 25th day of October, in 1765, and given by Jonathan Hampton of Elizabethtown, Sussex county, New Jersey, as the grantor, and Avis Schooley of Newton, Sussex Co, in the province of New Jersey, "widow," of the other part." For a consideration of "Proclamation Money," Hampton conveyed title to her for a "Lot of Upland and meadow situate in Newton, part of a tract surveyed for Governor Penn, running along lands owned by Asa Schooley. The terms state in this Deed: "Together with all and singular, the mines, minerals, ways, waters, watercourses, fowlings, fishings, huntings, powers, profits, commodities, Inprovements, Hereditaments, and appurtenances to the same belonging, or in any way appurtaining." This Indenture or Deed was acknowledged by Hampton, on the 20th of February, 1771, before Nathan Pettit, Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Sussex County. [74] [75] The above tract of land was 20 years later, in 1785, by will of Avis Schooley, bequeathed to her son Samuel Schooley, Jr., and was by him conveyed to Samuel Lundy, formerly his brother-in-law. [76]

1771 The will of Avis Schooley, of Newtown, Sussex Co, was dated June 20. Son, Joseph Schooley, 5 shillings. Son, Benjamin, 5 shillings. Granddaughter, Ann Simcock, some goods. To Martha Schooley, my daughter-in-law, some goods. Granddaughter, Avis Dyer, a dish. Son, Samuel Schooley, rest of personal and real estate. Executor: son, Samuel. Witnesses: Isaac Lundy, Daniel Lundy, Samuel Lundy. Proved May 24, 1785. [77] [78] [79] [80]

1785 Avis (Holloway) Schooley died at Newton, Sussex County, New Jersey, aged 83 yrs. Her will left 5 shillings each to her sons Joseph and Benjamin. Samuel Schooley received the remainder of the property and was the executor. Avis Schooley also mentioned her daughter-in-law Martha (Lundy) Schooley, and her granddaughters Ann Simcock and Avis Dyer. It is dated June 20, 1771, and was probated May 24, 1785. Witnessed by Isaac, Samuel, and Daniel Lundy. [81] [82]

1809 A "Warrant from the Council of Proprietors" of the new Western Division of New Jersey, issued on the first day of August, 1809, clarifies the location of one of Samuel's homes. The warrant required a "Resurvey of lands for James Schooley, son of Joseph, and a grandson of Samuel." These lands were "situate in the township of Washington, formerly Lebanon, in the county of Morris, formerly Hunterdon in the western Div. of New Jersey" The beginning of the survey was near the Mineral Springs about one mile and a half northeast from Samuel Schooley's former home, or residence." [83]

1853 At the first Centenary celebration of the erection of Sussex County at Newton, the Rev. Joseph Tuttle in his address on that occasion said: "From 1753, when Sussex was organized, until 1768 the county was without representation in the Colonial Assembly. No one was eligible as a representative who did not own at least one thousand acres of land or five hundred pounds sterling English money."

A substantial biosketch is given in [84]

A summary of descendants of William Schooley, son of Thomas and Sarah Schooley, has been published. [85]

A biosketch reports [86] [87]:

Samuel Schooley was born in the upper part of the province of East Jersey, in the year 1697, of parents who were members of the Society of Friends, and early settlers in that neighbourhood. He was educated with care, and the labours of his parents were blessed to him, through the visitations of the Lord's Holy Spirit, and his submission thereto. Of him his memorial states, " He was a man of an innocent, inoffensive conduct, cheerful and pleasant in conversation, of a sound and deep judgment, well grounded in the principles of Truth. Although it was his lot to live mostly remote from Friends' meetings, amongst people of other societies, yet the education of his children became his care and concern, early to impress on their, tender minds the principles of Truth, both by example and precept. The happy effect of this, through the blessing of the Almighty, he had to behold in some of his children, who laid down their heads, we have cause to believe, in peace with the Almighty, and in unity with their brethren, some time before their parent, who faithfully discharged the trust reposed in him on that important occasion."

Samuel Schooley was held in much esteem, as an elder of Kingwood Monthly Meeting, discharging his duty therein, and over the flock of Christ as a father in the Truth. His memorial thus closes, "he delighted much in the company of his Friends, and was well beloved by them and others. We have good reason to believe he is gone to enjoy that rest which is prepared for those who faithfully hold out to the end."

He departed this life at Mendham, within the limits of Woodbridge Monthly Meeting, Second month 8th, 1761, being nearly 64 years old.


Footnotes:

[1] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724, 4, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[2] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Marriages, Births, Deaths, and Marriage Intentions (from the Minutes), Certificates of Removal 1684-1847 (NJ/B2F:L), [AncestryImage], [AncestryRecord].

[3] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 132, [GoogleBooks].

[4] May Schooley Ivey, A Pioneer Schooley Family (1941), 1.

[5] William C. Armstrong, The Lundy Family and Their Descendants of Whatsoever Name (1902), 451, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[6] The Friend, A Religious and Literary Journal 33 (1860), 45, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[7] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 132, [GoogleBooks].

[8] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 132, [GoogleBooks].

[9] William C. Armstrong, The Lundy Family and Their Descendants of Whatsoever Name (1902), 452, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[10] Theodore Frelinghuysen Chambers, The Early Germans of New Jersey (1895), 480, [InternetArchive].

[11] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 234, citing Lib. 2, p. 72, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[12] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 132, [GoogleBooks].

[13] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724, 81, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[14] New Jersey Record of Wills, 1-460, 1688-1713, 1192, image 200, [FamilySearchImage].

[15] New Jersey Record of Wills, 1705-1804, 2-270, [FamilySearchImage].

[16] New Jersey Record of Wills, 1705-1804, 2-273, [FamilySearchImage].

[17] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 56-57, [GoogleBooks].

[18] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 406, abstract, omits sons Thomas and William, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[19] "Marriages at Chesterfield, New Jersey, 1685-1730," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 9 (1885), 347-352, at 351, [GoogleBooks].

[20] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724, 92, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[21] Chesterfield Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey, Births and Deaths, 1675-1750, Vol. K, Marriages, 1684-1724, 49, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[22] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 22. (Marriage Records, 1665-1800) (1900), 667, reports 27th 3rd mo 1720, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[23] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 132, [GoogleBooks].

[24] Colonial Conveyances East & West New Jersey. Deed (Book-Page), D-102.

[25] Colonial Conveyances East & West New Jersey. Deed (Book-Page), GG-438.

[26] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 132, [GoogleBooks].

[27] William C. Armstrong, The Lundy Family and Their Descendants of Whatsoever Name (1902), 452, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[28] Theodore Frelinghuysen Chambers, The Early Germans of New Jersey (1895), 174, [InternetArchive].

[29] Theodore Frelinghuysen Chambers, The Early Germans of New Jersey (1895), 480, [InternetArchive].

[30] Edmund Drake Halsey, 1739 History of Morris County, New Jersey (1882), 373, [InternetArchive].

[31] Richard T. Irwin, The Religious Society of Friends in Randolph Township; A History (1973), 6, [AncestryImage].

[32] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 135, [GoogleBooks].

[33] Mary C. Vail, "A historical sketch of the Meeting and Meeting House of the Society of Friends, at Quakertown, N.J.," The Jerseyman 2(1893), 9-12, at 9, [InternetArchive].

[34] Theodore Frelinghuysen Chambers, The Early Germans of New Jersey (1895), 480, [InternetArchive].

[35] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 136, [GoogleBooks].

[36] William C. Armstrong, The Lundy Family and Their Descendants of Whatsoever Name (1902), 452, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[37] William C. Armstrong, The Lundy Family and Their Descendants of Whatsoever Name (1902), 452, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[38] Richard T. Irwin, The Religious Society of Friends in Randolph Township; A History (1973), 6, [AncestryImage].

[39] Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, Minutes, 3-127, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[40] Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, Minutes, 3-168, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[41] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 136, [GoogleBooks].

[42] Theodore Frelinghuysen Chambers, The Early Germans of New Jersey (1895), 480, [InternetArchive].

[43] William C. Armstrong, The Lundy Family and Their Descendants of Whatsoever Name (1902), 452, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[44] Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, Minutes, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[45] Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, Minutes, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[46] Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, Minutes, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[47] James P. Snell, History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1881), 446, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[48] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 137, [GoogleBooks].

[49] William C. Armstrong, The Lundy Family and Their Descendants of Whatsoever Name (1902), 453, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[50] William C. Armstrong, The Lundy Family and Their Descendants of Whatsoever Name (1902), 453, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[51] Norman C. Wittwer, "Hunterdon County Freeholders, 1741," The Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey 37 (1962), 49-56, at 56.

[52] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 137, [GoogleBooks].

[53] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 135, [GoogleBooks].

[54] William C. Armstrong, The Lundy Family and Their Descendants of Whatsoever Name (1902), 452, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[55] Theodore Frelinghuysen Chambers, The Early Germans of New Jersey (1895), 173, of 173-74, [InternetArchive].

[56] Theodore Frelinghuysen Chambers, The Early Germans of New Jersey (1895), 480, [InternetArchive].

[57] William C. Armstrong, Pioneer Families of Northwestern New Jersey (1979), 460, [GoogleBooks].

[58] Edmund Drake Halsey, 1739 History of Morris County, New Jersey (1882), 373, right column, [InternetArchive].

[59] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 137, [GoogleBooks].

[60] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 137, [GoogleBooks].

[61] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 139, [GoogleBooks].

[62] Sussex County, New Jersey, Deed E2-206.

[63] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 139, [GoogleBooks].

[64] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 32. (Wills and Administrations 3, 1751-1760) (1924), 252-53, [InternetArchive].

[65] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 132, [GoogleBooks].

[66] Mary C. Vail, "A historical sketch of the Meeting and Meeting House of the Society of Friends, at Quakertown, N.J.," The Jerseyman 2(1893), 9-12, at 11, [InternetArchive].

[67] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 140, [GoogleBooks].

[68] Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Rahway and Plainfield Monthly Meeting, Union, New Jersey, Births 1705-1901, Deaths 1705-1908, Marriages 1712-1805, 283, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[69] The Friend, A Religious and Literary Journal 33 (1860), 45, of 45-6, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[70] May Schooley Ivey, A Pioneer Schooley Family (1941), 1.

[71] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 141, [GoogleBooks].

[72] The Friend, A Religious and Literary Journal 33 (1860), 45, [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[73] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 142, [GoogleBooks].

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