Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy --- Go to Genealogy Page for Micajah Pickett --- Go to Genealogy Page for Kisanna Hinson

Notes for Micajah Pickett and Kisanna Hinson

1748 Micajah Pickett was likely born in either Virginia or North Carolina, depending upon the identity of his father. Micajah Pickett was a son of one of two brothers: Micajah Pickett Senior or James Pickett, perhaps. Micajah Pickett Senior lived in Caroline County, Virginia until after the likely birth of Micajah Pickett Jr, while James Pickett may have moved to North Carolina before Micajah Pickett Jr was born. Both had moved to North Carolina by the time Micajah Pickett Jr. became an adult.

1768 Micajah Pickett Jr purchased 3 parcels of land in Anson County, North Carolina, from William Stoutly Sherly, of St. Pauls Parish, Georgia. A 125 acre tract, previously granted to Wm. Blewett on March 6, 1750, was on the north bank of Cartledge Creek … to Dry Fork, northeast of Pee Dee [River]. The tract was sold for 12 pounds. Witnessed by Isom Hanson, Elizabeth (P) Pickett, and John Sutton on January 13. Land of Henry Haggott was adjacent. [1] William Stoutly Sherly sold another tract of land to Micajah Pickett, of Craven County, South Carolina, by deed, dated January 12, with the same witnesses as on deed H1-205. [2] William Stoutly Sherly sold another tract of land to Micajah Pickett Jr, "of the waters Craven County, South Carolina", by deeds, dated January 13. Same witnesses as on deed H1-205, except H1-210 named Isom Hinson. [3] A fourth deed was for a tract of 100 acres originally granted to Christopher Hunt in 1762. [4] [Photocopy, Map: Cartledge Creek, North/South Carolina.] [Brothers Mace and William both had wives named Elizabeth. Micajah had a brother-in-law named Isham Hinson]

1768 Micajah Pickett and Kisanna Hinson were married on December 24, in Craven District, South Carolina. [5]

1768 Land of William Mitchell on Taylors Creek, a branch of Wateree River, in Craven County, South Carolina was shown on a survey map as adjoining that of Micajah Pickett and Francis Laton, dated December 28. [6]

1770 Micajah Pickett was granted 200 acres "situate in Craven County on Reedy Branch the Southwest side of Wateree River and Waters of Wateree Creek bounding north East by Land of Joseph Cates all other sides by vacant land." Granted by Lieutenant Governor William Bull, for King George the Third. Grant dated April 7. Plat survey dated March 6. [7] [8] [9] [10]

1770 William Mitchell Memorial for 150 acres on Taylors Creek, Craven Co, South Carolina, dated September 17. Also named: Micajah Pickett and Frances Leaton. [11]

1770 Micajah Pickett's land was described as Northwest of land of William Mitchell on Taylor's Creek, a branch of Wateree River. Survey dated December 28, 1768. [12] [13] [14]

1770 A survey of land between Wateree and Dutchmans Creeks, Craven County, South Carolina, made for Philip Hinson on January 22, 1770, was cited in a plat to Abediah Hinson, dated February 6, 1786. Land of Micajah Puket was adjacent. [15] [16] [17]

1771 William Housten was granted 100 acres on Bullskin Run, Craven County, South Carolina, bounded on two sides by Micajah Pickett. [18]

1771 A survey, dated July 23, shows land on Wateree Creek in Craven County, South Carolina granted to Augustus Prestwood, bounding on Micajah Pickett, and William Jones. [19]

1773-1774 A lease and release [no location reported] was recorded for Micajah Pickett to Peter Donald. [20]

1775 A deed from Micajah Pickett to Daniel Smith was recorded in the Anson County, North Carolina court. July 11. [21]

1775 Micajah Picket, of Craven County, South Carolina, sold land to Philemon Thomas, on January 20, for 60 pounds. The tract was on the northeast side of the Peedee on the main fork of Cartiledge's Creek. The tract was granted to William Stutley Shearley on July 1, 1775, and from him to Micajah Pickett. Witnessed by James Terry and Joseph Hall. Proved by James Terry, July Court 1777. [22] [23]

1775 Micajah Pickett of Craven County, South Carolina sold land to Daniel Smith of Anson County, North Carolina, on January 20, for 70 pounds. The tract, in Anson, had been granted to Christopher Hunt by patent 1762, on Cartledge's creek, 100 acres, granted Wm. Blewett March 6, 1759 and sold to George Carter, then by deed to Wm. Stutely Shirley. It is said to have been granted in 1750 by mistake and is now in possession of Micajah Pickett. James Terry, Charles Hines. Proved July Court of 1775 by Charles Hines. [24]

1778 Macajah Pickett purchased land from Ely Kirshaw, merchant, both of Camden District, South Carolina. One 200 acre tract was in Craven County on the north prong of Wateree Creek, adjacent to land of Samuel Griffin. The land had been originally granted to John Griffin in 1759. The other 100 acre tract had been granted to Benjamin Martin in 1776. The deed was dated on October 17, 1778. [25]

1779 A lease and release [no location reported] was recorded for Micajah Pickett and wife to Jasper Rogers. [26]

1780 Micajah Pickett and James Pickett, perhaps this one and his brother, were in a spy ring in Charleston: "In July, Francis 'The Swamp Fox' Marion, marched with General Horatio Gates to Camden, South Carolina, where General Gates ordered Marion to set up a spy ring in Charleston (among his men in this operation are James and Micajah Pickett). After Gates' defeat Francis Marion and his men set up a guerrilla movement to harass and destroy the British, giving rise to the legend of 'Swamp Fox'. In December of 1780 Governor John Rutledge promoted Francis Marion to Brigadier General. Joining with General Nathaniel Greene, Continental forces slowly pushed General Lord Cornwallis out of the South and consolidated their hold. In 1782 Colonel Thompson led a 700 man force from Charleston and managed to scatter Marion's men, but was subsequently defeated. Francis Marion’s last action in the war was on August 29, 1782 when he ambushed 200 men under Major Thomas Fraser at Fair Lawn, who attempted to reverse the trap and was left with an ammunition wagon." [27]

1781 Micajah Pickett supplied 16 bushels of corn for Militia use (Col. Hampton) in the Revolutionary War; payment was made on March 31, 1785. [28] [29] [30] [31]

1782 Micajah Pickett and Charles Pickett purchased items at the estate sale of Thomas Miles in Camden District, South Carolina. [32]

1783 Mecaga Pikett warranted the appraisement of the estate of John Agnew in Camden District, South Carolina. [33]

1783 Macajah Pickett purchased land from John and Priscilla Dismurks, all of Camden District, South Carolina. The 200 acre tract was in Craven County on the north prong of Wateree Creek, adjacent to land of John Griffin and Richard Griffin. The land had been originally granted to Samuel Griffin in 1759. The deed was dated on March 19. [34]

1783-84 The will of brother James Pickett of Camden District, South Carolina named wife Susan and children John, Ruben, Elizabeth, and Frankey. Brother Micajah Pickett, friend Frederick Briggs, and wife Susana were named executors. Witnessed by Nazarus and Ann Whited and John Lewis. [35]

1784 John McCaw surveyed a plat to James Johnstons for 130 acres on south side of Wateree Creek, Camden District, South Carolina on October 28. Land of Micajah Pickett was adjacent. [36]


1784 Survey for Thomas Lewers, upside down Micager Pickett at bottom

1784 A survey for land of Thomas Lewers on a branch of Wateree Creek showed adjacent land of Micager Pickett. Dated August 18. [37]


1784 Survey for Thomas Lewers, naming Micager Pickett at bottom

1784 John McCaw surveyed a plat of 640 acres on south side of Wateree Creek, Camden District, South Carolina for Micajah Pickett, on November 9. Also named are Nezirious Whitehead, Ferry, Miller, and Samuel Waugh and locations Big Branch, Rocky Branch, and Wateree Creek. [38] [39]

1784 Micajah Pickett purchased land from William Tidwell, both of St. Mark's parish, Camden District, South Carolina. The tract was in St. Mark's parish on Wateree Creek adjacent to lands of William Hill and Charles Hill Senior. Smallwood Owen and Thomas Stone witnessed the deed and confirmed the deed before Charles Pickett on December 12, 1782. Recorded on November 1, 1792 with the signature of Charles Pickett, J.P. [40]

1785 Micajah Pickett was granted 640 acres of land on the branches of Wateree Creek, Camden District, South Carolina bounded by lands of Abraham Miller, Micajah Pickett, Nezerious Whitehead, Samuel Waugh and Terry. Dated January 21. [41]

1785 Macajah Pickett purchased land from Patrick and Rose Lowry, all of South Carolina. The 200 acre tract was in Craven County on a small prong of Wateree Creek, adjacent to land of Abraham Miller. The land had been originally granted to Rose Miller in 1773. The deed was dated on March 10. [42]

1785 Macaijah Pickett was appointed, on July 27, overseer of the road from the Mountain Gap to the County Line in Fairfield County, South Carolina. William Cason was appointed overseer from Wateree Creek to Dutchmans Creek, where Micajah owned land, according to the deeds listed above. [43] [44]

1786, 1792, 1794, 1797, 1798 Micajah Pickett served on the grand jury for Fairfield County, South Carolina. [45]

1786 Micajah Pickett was an arbitor, on August 17, between Isaac Love and Thomas Stark in Fairfield County, South Carolina. [46]

1786 Nathan Sanders bought 100 acres on Wateree Creek from John Watts. The tract was originally granted to Ambrose Mills, then sold to son William Mills, then sold to Micajah Pickett on December 10, 1784. Final deed witnessed by Henry Sanders and William Tidwell. [47]

1787 A land survey was made for Micajah Pickett. The warrant was issued in Camden District. The tract consisted of 1000 acres on the waters of Rocky & Wateree Creek. Lees Road went through the tract. Dated September 19. Math' Millers, William A Hendrick, Nar? Whitehead, Capt Lang, Hugh McDonald, and Sam'l Waugh were adjacent landowers. [48]

1787 Micajah Pickett was a tax assessor for the district between Broad and Catawba Rivers, when the region between the old and new lines of Charleston and Orangeburgh districts was assigned to the parish of St. Matthew. [49]

1788 Land surveys were made for Micajah Pickett of two plats of 600 acres and 400 acres on Wateree and Rocky Creeks, Camden District, South Carolina. The surveys were dated on on April 4. Adjacent lands were owned by Micajah Pickett, Nazarus Whitehead, Minor Winn, Abraham Miller, William McClintick, and Hugh McDonald on the 600 acre tract and Samuel Waugh on the 400 acre tract. [50] [51] [52]

1790 Micajah Pickett lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina, in a household with 5 males under age 16, 2 males age 16 and over, 3 females, and 10 slaves. [53] Listed nearby were brothers-in-law Obadiah and Bartlett Hinson.

1790 Micajah Pickett purchased two tracts of land, on August 20, in Rutherford County, North Carolina, from Eleanor and William Giffin, both of Rutherford County, North Carolina. The land was on both sides of Whiteoak Creek. One tract was adjacent to land of Samuel Young and William Griffin, meandering to Potters Ford, to the line of Samuel Brayers, ... dividing line between James Capshaw and John Cummins. A second tract referred to deeds naming ... Richard Ufsery ... George Alexander ... Returned May 28, 1803. [54] [55]

1791 Micajah Pickett was an arbitor at court in Fairfield County, South Carolina. [56]

1791 A land survey was made for Micajah Pickett of a 45 acre tract on the Waters of Dutchmans Creek in Fairfield County & Camden District, South Carolina. The tract was bounded by Edward Minard, Jonathan Bolton, Jesse Powell, and Charles Pickett. [57]

1792 Micajah Pickett was a taxpayer in Fairfield County, South Carolina with 9 slaves and 1200 acres. [58]

1792 Micajah Pickett, of Craven County, South Carolina, purchased land from William Mills, of Rutherford County, North Carolina. The tract of 100 acres had been originally granted to Ambrose Mills in 1773 and was in Craven County on Wateree Creek adjacent to land of John Lee. The deed was dated on December 10 and was witnessed by John Mills, Surls Lewis, and Ann Mills. [59]

1793 Micajah Pickett was named as a commissioner, on June 14, for Mountain Gap Road [perhaps west of Dutchman Creek] in Fairfield County, South Carolina to determine if it should be changed to turn at the plantation of John Tidwell. [60]

1794 Micajah Pickett brought a court case against Ephraim Pettypool, settled out of court in Fairfield County, South Carolina. Dated in January. [61]

1794 A land survey was made for Micajah Pickett, for 45 acres of land situate in Camden District, Fairfield County, on the waters of Dutchmans Creek. Adjacent land was owned by Charles Pickett, Jesse Lowell, Jonathan Belton, and Edward Minard. Dated September 5. [62] [63]

1794 Micajah Pickett, of Greenville District, South Carolina, purchased land from William Cornelius. The land was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on the Chickero River. The land had been adjacent to lands of William Cornelius and Dennis Duff. Dated January 13. [64]

1797 William Lynch granted land to Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, on January 31. The 50 acre tract was on Saluda River, Greenville District, South Carolina, adjacent to land of Wm Cornelius. [65]

1797 Micajah Pickett provided security for the guardianship of children of Susan Knox, widow of Robert Knox. [66]

1798 Garner Miller was granted land on Rockey Spring, Fairfield County, Camden District adjacent to lands of Micajah Pickett. [67]

1799 Micajah Pickett purchased four lots in the town of Sneedsborough from William Johnson. Witnessed by John Hinson Jur [perhaps a brother of Kisannah Hinson]. Dated February 8. The deed was conditional on building a a good framed house with a brick chimney on one of the lots. [68] Sneesborough is now a ghost town. [69]

1799 Micajah Pickett purchased two adjoining tracts of land, in Rutherford County, North Carolina, on August 20, from William Giffin, both of Rutherford County, North Carolina. One tract of 150 acres of land was formerly granted to James Capshan, on a line agreed upon by Richard Usseng? and Samuel Young. The second tract of 100 acres was granted by patent to Francis Brown in 1747 and was adjacent to lands of Moses Rights. Witnessed by William Caphsan and Rus'l Turtty. Returned May 30, 1803. [70] [71]

1799 Micajah Pickett and others were appointed by the Rutherford County court to lay off and mark a road from William Hawkins on Green Creek to intersect with the road leading from Col. Earle. October court records. [72]

1800 A land survey was made for Micajah Pickett for a tract of 80 acres on the Waters of the north prong of the Wateree Creek in fairfield District, South Carolina. James Pickett, Reuben Stark, and James Weir were adjacent landowners. The survey was recorded on July 18. [73]

1800 There were three listings for Micajah Pickett in the 1800 census. One was in Rutherford County, North Carolina. There were two listings for Micajah Pickett in Fairfield County, South Carolina; perhaps separate households for Micajah Pickett or for father and son.

1800 Micajah Pickett (perhaps the son of this Micajah) lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina in a household with free white males: 1 (under 10), 1 (10 thru 15), and 3 (16 thru 25); and free white females: 1 (45 and over); and 13 slaves. George Beazley was listed nearby. [74]

1800 Micajah Pickett lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina in a household with free white males: 1 (26 thru 44); and free white females: 1 (10 thru 15) and 1 (16 thru 25); and 8 slaves. [75]

1800 Micajah Picket lived in Morgan Twp, Rutherford County, North Carolina in a household with free white males: 1 (under 10), 1 (10 thru 15), and 2 (45 and over); and free white females: 2 (under 10) and 1 (26 thru 44); and 7 slaves. [76] [77]

1800 Micajah Pickett and Susannah Johns recorded an agreement, on March 27, in Rutherford County, North Carolina. [Photocopy, Agreement Susanna Johns and Micajah Pickett (original).] [Photocopy, Agreement Susanna Johns and Micajah Pickett (will book typed transcription.] [78] [79]:

Records of July Court 1800: State of North Carolina, Rutherford County. Articles of an agreement Bargain made between Susanna Johns and Micajah Pickett to live together, the said Susannah hath bargained and agreed with the said Micajah to live with him during his natural life to do her endeavor to the care of his person and Property and to behave towards him in every way the same as a good wife does to her Husband till separated by death of the said Micajah for his part hath bargained with the said Susannah give her one Negro woman named Closey & her child Rachel also one mare & one horse to work one Woman's saddle & the third part of the House furniture & third of all the working tools & the third of all the cattle & Hogs that is in the county aforesaid which they are to live all to be given up the said Susannah at the Decease of the said Micajah if the said Susannah shall decease Before the said Micajah then and in that case then & in that case the above named Mutaller child Rachel is to be given to the said Susannah Johns, & Daughter Sarah Johns to her and her Heirs forever & the Remainder of the Property to remain the sd. Micajahs & the said Micajah agrees to his endeavor to take care of the said Susannah in every way the same as a good husband does to his wife and lend her all his land now lying on the South side of WhiteOak Creek including the Buildings during her natural life to live on then to Return to said Micajah's heirs Witness we have hereunto set our hands this 27th day of March 1800. Micajah Pickett, Susannah Johns, Samuel Young, Adam Thompson.

1800 An entry was made and struck from the Rutherford County court records; "Adam Thompson proved a deed in open court from Micajah Pickett Susannah Johns." Deed #10, October court. [80]

1800 Micajah and Kisannah Pickett signed an agreement. Micajah stated that he was withdrawing from Kisannah against her will and that she had given him bond to not molest him for the property and money that he might carry off to Rutherford County, North Carolina or in controversy of any kind. The deed was dated December 12 and was recorded on January 16, 1832. [81]

1800 Micajah Pickett and others were appointed by the Rutherford County court to lay off a road from the State Line leading from Granby to the Green River Road to Mills's Gap. [82]

1801 Micajah Pickett was granted 80 acres in Fairfield District on Wateree Creek andjacent to lands of James Pickett. [83]

1802 A land survey was made for Micajah Pickett for a tract of 108 acres on the Waters of the Wateree Creek in Fairfield District, South Carolina. Micajah Pickett, Edmund Stroud, and Donneley were adjacent landowners. The survey was recorded on December 3. [84]

1802 Micajah Pickett served on the jury of the Rutherford County court. [85]

1803 Micajah Pickett wrote to Susanna Johns on December 22:

Dear Sukey, I still wish you to come home and live with me. As you went away and left me and broke the first bargain of Clarey and Rachel and they are sold and gone now --- If you will come and live with me as long as I live, I will in lieu and in place of Clarey and Rachel give you Fillis and her increase during your natural life and the third part of the house, furniture, and the third of the cattle and hogs, and two work nags as at the first bargain. All to you during your natural life and after your decease, the negro Fillis and her increase and all that I give you shall be given to your children that you have had and will have, one by me and your daughter Sarah Johns. She shall share as one of them, having one equal part of above named property. You shall have the part of land from the house up the river that I bought of John Mills, including the houses and apple orchard during your life. If you choose to live at Whiteoak you shall have your choice when you come to make your decision of the two places, and if you choose to have me after trying two or three months, I will give you a creature and saddle sufficient to ride. If you still love me (or will have me), Little Sukey, and if you will choose to live by me where I can see the children, I will bind you a house and maintain my children. This shall stand good in love if you come. M. Pickett.

1803 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, sold a tract of 184 acres to William Pickett, of Fairfield District, South Carolina. The deed was dated January 24 and was witnessed by Reuben Pickett and James Pickett. [86]

1803 Micajah and Kesaneh Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, sold land to William and Micajah Pickett Jr James John Reuben and Charles Pickett, all of Fairfield District, South Carolina. William got Poseys tract. Micajah [Jr] got land on Dabrie Creek. Son James got land on Datree Creek called Mull? tract with a mill. Son Ruben got Insths? tract on said creek. Son Charles got Richmonds tract on said creek. The sons were not to trade or sell their land until they reached age 25. The deed was dated January 24 and was witnessed by Reuben Pickett and James Pickett. [87]

1804 John Fisher enters 50 acres in Rutherford County, North Carolina on both sides of Green R; bordered by Micajah Pickett and Thomas Justuce's old line. Dated April 29. [88]

1805 William Mills enters 50 acres in Rutherford County, North Carolina, on both sides of Green R "between" his own lines; includes his own improvements where Micajah Pickett lives; discontinued "by order". Dated February 11. [89]

1805 Micajah Pickett gave a bond to Kizannah Pickett and an agreement of separation, dated on January 10. The agreement named children William, Micajah, James, John, Reuben, and Charles; and Jeptha, Isaiah, Elizabeth Mobley, Mary Jones, Charles Pickett. [90] [91] [92] [Transcription] Separation agreement Kizannah and Micajah Pickett. Micajah and Kisannah Picket made their final separation agreement in Greenville District, South Carolina [Greenville, South Carolina Bond Book A-46, registered June 15, 1825]. Micajah legally parted company with Kisannah, to live with his mistress, Susannah Jones.

1806 Micajah Pickett purchased, on December 6, from William and Ellen Mills, 5 tracts of land, on both sides of Green River, including the improvements where the Pickett now lives, one tract of 300 acres granted to Walter Sharp on Green River & on both sides of Panther Creek ... also one tract of 175 acres granted to John Kirkonell .. including the mouth of Brights Creek ... also one tract of 200 acres granted to William Mills ... also one tract of 50 acres granted to W'm Mills ... also one tract of 50 acres granted to Richard Newport lying on Panthers Creek. [93] [94] [95] [96] Panther Creek now flows into Lake Adger on Green River. [97] [98]

1807 Micajah Pickett purchased two tracts of land, on July 3, in Rutherford County, North Carolina, from Henry Dunham. The land was on the Green River and one tract had been granted to David Dickey by patent dated 1787 and the other to Henry Dunham dated 1796. Micajah Picket owned land adjacent to one of the tracts. [99] [100]

1807 Son Reuben Pickett died and brother James administered his account. James Picket gave his account of the estate of Reuben Pickett in 1808 with balance $1058.63. Payments of $211.72 were made to each of William Pickett, Micajah Pickett, James Pickett, John Pickett, and Chas Pickett. Note that these are the six sons of Micajah and Kisannah Pickett who were named in Micajah's 1822 will with a deed of gift. [101]

1808 Micajah Pickett purchased two tracts of land, in Rutherford County, North Carolina, from Ambrose Mills. Dated October 31. The land was on both sides of Panther Creek, of Green River. Witnessed by Richard Allen and William Riddle. [102] [103] Panther Creek now flows into Lake Adger on Green River. [104]

1808 A newspaper summary for the North Carolina Legislature House of Commons announced "Mr. Terrell, the petition of Micajah Pickett and Susannah Jones, on the subject of divorce; read and referred.". [105]


Micajah Pickett and Susannah Jones made a petition concerning divorce.
The Raleigh Minerva, Raleigh, North Carolina, December 1, 1808. [106]

1809 Micajah Pickett was granted 40 acres in Fairfield District on Wateree River. William Lowry, John Mccreary, and John Wickley were named. [107]

1810 Micajah Pickett purchased land, adjacent to his own on Green River, from Henry Dunham on November 14. [108]

1810 Micajah Pickett purchased two tracts of land on Panther Creek from Ambrose Mills on November 22. [109]

1810 Micajah Picket (age 45+) lived in Rutherford County, North Carolina in a household with 2 male and 2 female children (all age 0-10) and female (age 45+). Son Micajah Pickett, age 26-44 lived in Fairfield, South Carolina with female age 16-26 and two children. [110]

1812 John Fisher enters 50 acres in Rutherford County, North Carolina on both sides of Green R; bordered by Micajah Pickett and Thomas Justuce's old line. Dated September 3. [111]

1811-12 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, [this Micajah or his son?] purchased several tracts on Saluda River, Greenville, South Carolina. [112]

1811 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, purchased land from William Cornelius and wife Letitia Cornelius. The 191 acre tract was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on the Checaroah river waters of the Saluda River, adjoining land of Joseph Terry. Dated October 12 and witnessed by Andrew Walker and Nancy McKinny. The land was surveyed for John Ford in 1789 and William Cornelius in 1786. [113]

1811 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, purchased land from John Hightower. The 100 acre tract was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on both sides of the north fork of the Saluda or Chicaroa River, adjoining land of Dennis Duff, William Cornelius, and John Hightower. Dated November 7 and witnessed by Andrew Walker an William Cornelius. [114]

1812 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, purchased land from William Lynch. The land was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on the Saluda River, adjoining land of Wm Cornelius. Dated January 31. [115]

1812 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, purchased land from Andrew Walker and wife Elizabeth. The land was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on the Saluda River, adjoining land of Philip and Dennis Duff. Dated February 20. [116]

1812 Micajah Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, purchased land from Andrew Walker and wife Elizabeth. The land was in Greenville District, South Carolina, on the Saluda River, adjoining land of Robert Cooke and William Cornelius and John Hightower. Dated January 31. [117]

1813 Micajah Pickett enters 300 acres in Rutherford County, North Carolina on both sides of Green R; bordered by Gabriel Jackson, Thomas Cockram, Isaac Alridge, Andrew Hambleton and his own lines. Dated August 12. [118]

1814 "This is to certify...that on the 13th Jan 1814 that I, Kezannah Pickett then of Fairfield Dictrict, did sell ... to James Pickett of North Carolina, Rutherford County, 2 negroes, viz, Jim and Vilet during of my natural life and at my decease the said Negroes were to be returned if living as my estate..." [119]

1817 Micajah Pickett of Greenville County, South Carolina, sold several pieces of property totalling over 1075 acres, near Green River and Panther Creek in Rutherford County, North Carolina, including his residence, to James McKinney (son-in-law through Susanna Johns) of Rutherford, for $3500. [120] [121] David Dicky proved the deed for Micajah Pickett in court on January 6. [122]

1817 Thomas Cockerham sold land on Green River to John Hester. Dated February 28. [123]

1817 Thomas Cockerham sold land on Green River to James McKinney (son-in-law of Micajah Pickett through Susanna Johns). Dated March 28. [124]

1817 James Wear was granted land on Wateree Creek adjacent to lands of Micajah Pickett. [125]

1817 Marvill Mills and Amb'r Mills were listed as justices in Rutherford County, North Carolina. [126]

1819 Micajah Pickett sold several tracts of land, on White Creek to John Mills, on June 20. One tract was sold to Micajah by William Chiffin. Witnessed by Thos Moore and A Mills. [127]

1820 James Picket lived in Greenville County, South Carolina in a household with free white males: 2 (under 10), 1 (10 thru 15), and 2 (26 thru 44); and free white females: 1 (26 thru 44) and 1 (45 and over); and 9 slaves. [128] This could be Kisannah living with her son James (age 30) and his wife.

1820 Micagah Picket lived in Greenville County, South Carolina in a household with free white males: 1 (under 10), 1 (10 thru 15), and 1 (45 and over); and free white females: 1 (under 10), 1 (10 thru 15), and 1 (45 and over); and 24 slaves. [129]

1823 On January 1, widow Kisannah Pickett made an agreement with son James Pickett to pay him for her room and board. A negro man named Jim was to work. [130]

1823 The Equity Court of Greenville, South Carolina reported a Bill for discovery and relief by Kizannah Pickett, plaintiff, and Isaiah Pickett et al as defendants. The defendants were Jeptha Pickett, Isaiah Pickett, Sam'l Mobley & Elizabeth his wife, Hiram Whitted, Susannah Johns, James McKinney, Susannah his wife, Matilda Johns, Malachi Johns, Joseph Johns, Benjamin Johns & Eliza Johns. [131]

To the Honourable the Judges of the Court of Equity of the Said State.
Humbly complaining sheweth unto your Honours your oratrix Kizannah Pickett that about the year [blank] she was lawfully married to Micajah Pickett late of Greenville district now deceased to whom she brought a marriage portion of considerable value and equal to his expectations; that they lived together as married persons for many years, during which she bore him ten children of whom eight are now living, that during the whole period of their cohabitation your oratrix demeaned herself in every respect as a loving virtuous and obedient wife; and by her prudence, industry and economy contributed largely to the comfort & happiness of her Husband, to the maintenance & education of their children; and to the increase of their property; that a short time previous to the year 1800 the said Micajah Pickett, for causes unknown to your oratrix, and which if known it might be improper to disclose to your Honours, ceased to regard your oratrix with the esteem and affection he had before appeared to cherish for her, and ceased to treat her with the respect due to a wife, and finally that about the year 1800 he wholly withdrew his protection from her and abandoned her in her advanced age, without provision for her future subsistence and comfort; and carried with him all their property except one negro man, and a small girl violet then & for many years after rather an expense than a benefit; that upon such separation taking place the said Micajah agreed with your oratrix, that if she would forbear to molest him with lawsuits or controversy during his life, and relinquish all claim to his Estate except what she had received (the negro man & the girl violet which he yielded up to your oratrix) then the said Micajah in consideration thereof would cause to be paid to your oratrix on the day of his death, or as soon after as practicable such sum as should be scertained to be the value of the property kept & carried off by him on the separation that your oratrix well aware that she was that she had good cause of legal controversy against the said Micajah both for past misconduct as well as for her future maintenance, which he also well knew and justly apprehended, was yet ? to a public description of her private wrongs, and gladly availed herself of an opportunity to save the feelings of her numerous offspring; she therefore yielded her consent to the proposition of the said Micajah, But that your oratrix being wholly unskilled in the Law was ignorant of the form in which such an agreement ought to be drawn so as to have its due legal effecacy; and confiding in the integrity and sincerity of her husband and in his affection for his children if not for herself she unhesitatingly pursued the course suggested by himself; and on the 12th day of December 1800 about the time of the separation she entered into a Bond with ample security to the said Micajah, in the sum of six thousand dollars, with a condition that she should not molest him with lawsuits or contraversies of any kind; and that she should relinquish her claim on his estate except what he had allowed her: a copy of which Bond is herewith filed marked A and which your oratrix prays may be taken as part of his will: your oratrix further complaining shows to your Honours that it was then agreed and distinctly understood as the consideration and only condition on which her said bond was given that, as soon as the value of the property retained by the said Micajah Pickett and withdrawn? from its proper object the maintenance of your oratrix & her children could be ascertained, then the said Micajah should enter into a Bond to your oratrix to pay to her and to certain of her children as yet unprovided for the value of the property with interest; and that accordingly on the 10th day of January 1805 he the said Micajah executed his bond to your oratrix, a copy of which is also herewith filed marked B (and which may be regarded as part of her bill) in a penalty of thirty thousand dollars with a condition to pay at his death to your oratrix her heirs or assigns nine thousand eight hundred and fifty silver dollars with lawful interest from that date; which sum was by the said bond to be thus distributed viz Fourteen hundred Dollars to our son Jeptha Pickett; Fourteen hundred dollars to our son Isaiah Pickett, one thousand dollars to our daughter Elizabeth Mobly, four hundred dollars to Mary Jones another daughter and lastly the sum of five thousand six hundred & fifty dollars to your oratrix with interest as aforesaid from the 10th day of January 1805; which Bond was duly & solemnly executed in presence of three subscribing witnesses.

1823 Several heirs of Micajah Pickett agreed, on January 27, to have James Pickett try to get the inheritance from Micajah Pickett. The other heirs were named as John Pickett, Charles Pickett, Samuel Mobly, Isaiah Pickett, and Jeptha Pickett. Recorded July 6, 1829. [132]

1823 The will of Micajah Pickett of Buncomb County, North Carolina, was in probate court on February 15, 1823 in Greenville County, South Carolina and named Micajah's children by Kisanna and Susanna. [133] [134]

State of North Carolina. Buncombe County
In the name of God Amen I Micajah Pickett of the state and county aforesaid being in perfect mind and memory but weak in body and knowing it is appointed for all men once to die do make and ordain this my last will and Testament hereby revoking and disanulling all former will or wills by me made heretofore desiring this and this only to be put in execution by my Executors to be hereafter named as such -

First Recommending my soul to God …

Item the first my just debts be paid …

Item Second I establish my deed of gift to stand as it is recorded in the Clerks office in Fairfield district South Carolina to my six sons namely William, Micajah, James, John, Reubin, and Charles Pickett considering the provision made in said deed of gift for each and every of them the said Picketts as their full and Legal share and shares of my whole Estate and property

Item Third I give and bequeath to my son Jeptha Pickett all the Lands purchased from James Walker Senr. it being the upper part of my land in Greenville District to a conditional line made by said Walker and William Cornelius and Titles made to my by said Cornelius also four Negroes namely Dick, Biner, and her two children Isaac and Williss; also my chair and horse I work in it, and my watch together with all I have given him heretofore with the increase to him and his Heirs forever

Item fourth I give and bequeath to my son Isiah Pickett all the lands I purchased of Andrew Walker and fifty acres I purchased of William Lynch Sr also fifty acres I purchased of Alexander Cook, also a Tract of land in Fairfield District that my son Jephthah Pickett has or is to purchase for me one Thousand dollars being placed in said Jephthah hands for that purpose if said purchase is not made or the said Jephthah should decline or delay purchasing it in such case my Executors are authorized to require him to make the purchase or the Thousand dollars for the use of my son Isiah also four negroes namely Ned Dafney and luce and her child Bill; together with what I have give heretofore also a negro woman named Vilet and her increase at the death of said Isaiahs mother all with the increase to him and his Heirs forever.

Item fifth I give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Mobley a negro man Bob of whom she has had in possession since he was a boy; in lieu of giving her any more I give and bequeath to her orphan son Hiram Whitted and his heirs forever a negro boy named Rock

Item sixth I give and bequeath to my daughter Matilda Pickett Else Johns one Negro girl named Rose.

Item seventh I give and bequeath to my son Malachiah Pickett Else Johns one Negro boy named Washington.

Item eighth I give and bequeath to my son Joseph Pickett Else Johns one Negro boy named Bob.

Item ninth I give and bequeath to my son Benjamin Pickett Else Johns one Negro mulatto girl named Sarah which is now in the hands of my sister Sarah Aldridge at the death of said Sarah Aldredge.

Item tenth I give and bequeath to my little daughter Eliza Pickett Else Johns one Negro woman named Suck and her young child Peter with increase of said Suck from this time forward.

Item eleventh I give and bequeath to my friend Susannah Johns a negro woman named Phillis and all said Phillises children namely Oaty, tom Peggy and Ransom also two horse beasts fit to wride or work also third part of household & kitchen furniture also the third part of my hogs & cattle all during her natural life at her decease all the property mentioned in this item to be divided equally amongst her seven children six by me and one before to them and their heirs forever.

Item twelfth I give and bequeath to my six children that I had by said Susannah Johns all my property that is not before mentioned both Real and personal; names of the children is Susanna McKinney, Malechiah, Joseph, Matilda, Benjamin, and Eliza Picketts else Johns

Item thirteenth I allow my friend Susanna Johns to occupy a field called Betty Smiths field on my plantation in Greenville as long as she chooses to live on it and to occupy the upper room in the south end of my house in Greenville district.

Lastly I constitute my trusty friend Alexander McKinney and his son James McKinney and my son Jephthah Pickett and Hiram Whitted to be my Executors of these my last will and testament as witnessed I have hereunto set my hand and seal this second day of August [1822] the negroes and property mentioned in the Eleventh item to my friend Susannah Johns is confortable to our last bargain and agreement as recorded at Rutherford and in lieu and place of our first bargain.

Signed and sealed in presence of Richard Allen, Wheaton Merritt, Seaborn I Spann.

1823 William Pickett and siblings petitioned the Equity Court of Greenville, South Carolina against Susannah Johns and others. Responses from the defendants are included. Many expense reports are included. Some records suggest that letters from some of Kizannah's children were postmarked in Picketts Valley. [135]

William Pickett, Micajah Pickett, James Pickett, John Pickett, Jeptha Pickett, Charles Pickett, and Isaiah Pickett
vs
Susannah Johns, Hiram Whitted, James McKinney and Susannah his wife, Matilda Johns, Malachi Johns, Joseph Johns, Benjamin Johns, & Eliza Johns.

… William Pickett, Samuel Mobley & Elizabeth his wife late Elizabeth Pickett, Micajah Pickett, James Pickett, John Pickett, Jeptha Pickett, Charles Pickett, & Isaiah Pickett, that they are the lawful children of Micajah Pickett & Kizannah Pickett born in lawful wedlock: and heirs at law of the said Micajah late of the district of Greenville now deceased as will presently be stated, that the said Micajah shortly previous to the year 1800 for reasons unknown to your orator separated himself from his wife Kizannah, the mother of your orators, whom he abandoned, and withdrew himself for a time out of the state carrying with him a large amount of property, and leaving their said mother without any adequate provision for her maintenance that some agreement about the terms and conditions of them continuing to live apart was entered into between them which it is unnecessary to set forth to your honours: that immediately on the separation the said Micajah formed an illicit connection with one Susannah Johns, whom he took into his house with whom he lived in open adultry untill his death in December 1822 and by whom he had six illegitimate children, to whom he conferred his family name, and to whom he gave the most of his fortune as will presently be more particularly set forth; that at the commencement of his connection with the said Susannah Johns, as early as 1803, as an inducement for her to live with him, and as consideration for her subsequent adulterous intercourse, the said Micajah made an agreement with her by which he bound himself, if she would live with him during his life, to give her a negro woman named Phillis and her increase, one third of the household furniture, one third of the cattle and hogs, two workhorses, and permit her to occupy a part of a plantation during her life; and that at her death the said property should be equally awarded among her children, one Sarah Johns a daughter of hers born before her connection with him, and such children as she had then or might afterwards have by him: which agreement was recorded in a public office in North Carolina and a true copy of which is to be taken as part of this bill … in the year 1817 one James McKinne having intermarried with Susannah Pickett or Johns one of his illegitimate daughters by her the said Susannah Johns, the said Micajah pretended to sell to the said James McKinne for three thousand five hundred dollars sundry valuable tracts of land in North Carolina (he the said Micajah then being in & being a citizen of Greenville district in this state & which lands were worth eight or then thousand dollars; and pretended to sell the said James eight negroes for two thousand five hundred dollars, although he paid no part of either of the said sums of money mentioned as the price of the said land and negroes was ever paid; or ever intended to be paid; and to your orator expressly charges: that it was a mere shift to evade the law of this state against unreasonable dispositions of property in favor of illegitimate children; that it was in fact a gift to his daughter Susanna McKinne the wife of the said James with a secret understanding or engagement that the said James should hold the whole of the said property in trust for a future division among the brothers & sisters of his wife the other illegitimate children of the said Micajah; or for such purposes as the said Micajah by his will or otherwise might afterwards appoint; and so your orators charge: that the said James took possession of the said land & the negroes and hath since continued to hold and enjoy them. …

1823 Kezannah Pickett certified, on October 31, that she had received room and board from her son James Pickett, of Rutherford County, North Carolina, between January 13, 1814 and January 1, 1823, in place of the $42 due to her from the estate and that she had received back the Negroes, Jim and Vilet, that Kezannah, then of Fairfield District, had sold to James Pickett on 13 Jan 1814, but which remained part of her estate. [136] [137]

1823 Kezannah Pickett certified that she had received $262.12 from James Pickett for Willis, who was born to Vilet while James owned her. The accounting involved $151 that James had spent to raise, board, and pay tax for Willis; corn that James had lent to Kezannah and articles purchased from peddlers for $19.35; and cash paid to Isaiah Pickett for Kezannah's note of hand for $91.81. James certified that he had received $262.12 from Kezannah (perhaps in resolution of the above mentioned debts) for Willis and that he would return Wilis for her use if she repaid the amount with interest. [138] [139]

1825 Kezanna Pickett requested either William Choice or Nimrod Underwood to pay James Pickett "the amount of his judgement ... that I confessed to him at April last; judgement is for $2,127.77 ... as will appear in your office". [140]

1827 The dispute between Kizannah Picket and Susanna Johns was considered in detail by the North Carolina Supreme Court. [141]

1827 In the deposition of Jeptha Pickett given February 5, 1827, the second interrogatory and response are as follows (punctuation added): "Int. 2d What were the ages of the legitimate children of Micajah Pickett decd." "Ans. William Pickett was born Decr 15th, 1769; Mary Pickett was born April 12th, 1772; Elizabeth Pickett was born Sep 13, 1774; Micajah Pickett was born March 5th, 1777; James Pickett was born Oct 11th 1779; John Pickett was born March 21, 1782; Reuben Pickett was born May 27th, 1785; Jeptha Pickett was born April 17th, 1788; Charles Pickett was born April 12, 1791; Isaiah Pickett was born July 19, 1793. The above is according to the family Bible of Micajah Pickett."

1828 "Know all men ... I James Pickett, in consideration of $2067.40 due 1 day after date payable to Wm Choice, Comm. Equity of Greenville District, hath bargained ... to Jeptha Pickett, Co-signer of Note of Security, his heirs ... forever the following negro(es), to wit, Landen, Harriet, March, Mariah, Kezia and her 4 children, Romeo, Henry, John and Alsey, to have and ... unto the sd Jeptha Pickett, his heirs ... Also, I have signed a Bond with Jeptha Pickett, John B Pickett and Jesse ?Havis which the sd Jeptha gave to Wm Choice as Trustees of Kezannah Pickett for $12,120, (on) 20 Sept 1826. (date) 23 Jan 1828. (S) Jeptha Pickett and James Pickett. Witnesses: Tandy Walker, S Crayton, J H Goodlett, CCP and JQ." [142]

1829 Kesannah Pickett agreed that she, widow of Micajah Pickett, had received Micajah's bond, 10 Jan 1805, and an agreement of separation, with son Charles Pickett appointed as trustee, and that she would pay James Pickett for clothing and boarding and support and would pay the balance to sons Wm, Micajah Jun, James, John, Charles, and Reuben and Reuben is not but to them and their heirs forever... dated 4 July. [143]

1829 Kezanna Pickett brought a legal suit against James McKenney for sale of land in Rutherford County, North Carolina. [144]

1829 Charles Pickett petitioned the Equity Court of Greenville, South Carolina. [145] A document was attached concerning a 1000 acre plantation on Saluda River which was mortgaged to Charles by James as security for performing the covenants described. [146]

… In consideration of all which and for as much as a full and final settlement of all the matters sbove set forth can only be made by the aid of this Court your orator humbly prays that your Honors would consider your writ of subpoena to issue to be directed to the said Kizannah Pickett, Micajah Pickett, James Pickett, John Pickett, Jeptha Pickett, Isaiah Pickett (Elizabeth Mobly and Samuel Mobly) and Rufus K. Pickett, who is the executor of Wm Pickett deceased, who are the heirs and distributors of the said Micajah Pickett, commanding them …

1829 "Susanna Johns and others vs Kezanna Pickett and others, from Rutherford. Decree upon report - sale confirmed and order of reference to David L Swain to take the accounts of Hiram Whitted." [147]

1831 James Pickett transferred land, on August 4, to Kizannah Pickett, in Franklin County, Georgia, that James had purchased in 1828 from Benjamin Harrison. Witnessed by Micajah Pickett, Van G A Griffin, and A W Hansell. [148]

1829-37 Royal Bryan paid taxes in Franklin County, Georgia, acting as agent for James Pickett (non-resident) in 1829-31 [149] and for Kizannah Pickett in 1833-1847 [150].

The legal battle between Kizannah Pickett and Susanna Johns went before the North Carolina Supreme Court and arose because Micajah transferred much of his estate to an heir of Susanna Johns before Micajah died, so Micajah's estate could not meet the obligations that Micajah had made to Kizannah when they separated. [151]

1836 Peter Coward sold land to Allen Tabor by deed dated April 25. The land was on Green River. One of the tracts was adjacent to land of Micajah Pickett and Henry Durham(?). [152]

Research Notes:

There were three successive generations of Micajah Pickett in this family. We have found land records naming Micajah Pickett in three areas in North and South Carolina. During this time, the border between North and South Carolina was changing. [Photocopy, 1700-1815 Border of North-South Carolina.] [Photocopy, 1827 map, North-South Carolina.]:

The border of Greenville County, South Carolina and Buncombe and Rutherford Counties, North Carolina.

On the Wateree River in Fairfield County, South Carolina (Micajah by 1768 and William Pickett, by 1809).

Cartledge Creek and the Pee Dee River in Richmond County (East of Anson County) North Carolina, near Blewett Lake, north of Rockingham (1768, Micajah Pickett Jr). Cartledge Creek is an unnamed creek on the east side of the Pee Dee River, north of Mountain Creek. [153] [154] A story-teller recounts [155]:

For many years, Indian tribes lived, fished and hunted along the Pee Dee River. As the white men came, they needed a ford to be able to cross the river with their wagons and horses. They soon learned the only place the river could be forded with normal water levels was just above Grassy Island. This place is about 10 miles northwest from the present town of Rockingham. Keep in mind, Blewett Falls Dam wasn’t built until the early 1900s and there were no bridges to cross the river or the many creeks that ran through the area.

In the early 1700s, a large chunk of land known as Anson County was formed out of what then was Bladen County. This land included present Anson, Richmond, Scotland, Montgomery, Stanly, Union and many other present counties in North and South Carolina.

Sometime in the early 1700s, the first white settlement in Anson County was formed on the west bank of the Pee Dee River. It was located not far from the river, about four or five miles above the present day Blewett Falls Dam and was called Mount Pleasant. The little settlement prospered, not only from the rich farmland but also because it was located close to the river ford so people settled on both sides of the river.

As the settlement grew, a court system needed to be set up in the new county. A small log cabin was built around Mount Pleasant and was used to hold court and to house the legal documents of the times.

There are still several creeks in our area that still hold the names first given to them — such as Cartledge Creek (Edmund Cartledge), Jones Creek (Thomas Jones) and Coleman Creek (John Coleman).

In the 1750s, more settlers started trickling in along the river and creeks of our area. There they built log cabins, planted small farms and fished and hunted to feed themselves and their families. A good number of them settled on the eastern side of Pee Dee River around the Grassy Island area, right across the river from Mount Pleasant in what is now Richmond County.

Grassy Island is a strip of old islands that form in the river just south of Mountain Creek and extend to the mouth of Little River. A Mr. Ingram once ran a fishery on the island and used a flat boat to cross the waterway to get to his home. Most of the people settled on the mainland and used the rich soil to grow crops and raise livestock.

The islands once belonged to the Colemans, the Pickets, the Steeles and the Ingrams. Men who traveled by boat or flat up the Pee Dee River would stop in and trade with the people at Grassy Island so it soon became a well-known trading post.

In the 1750s, an old Indian trail running parallel with the river from South Carolina to Mangum, N.C. and beyond became known as the Old River Road. This road was dotted with very steep hills and curves. With no bridges over the creeks, people with horses and wagons were forced to ford at shallow places.

It is unclear which generation of Micajah Pickett; born about 1709 (perhaps the father), 1748 (this Micajah), or 1777 (son); was involved in each deed. The 1800 census suggests that at that time, son Micajah lived in Fairfield District, South Carolina while this Micajah may have had households in both Fairfield District, South Carolina and in Anson County, North Carolina. We have listed many documents involving Micajah Pickett on Cartledge Creek, Pee Dee River, or in Anson County, North Carolina, in these notes for Micajah, born 1748. We welcome further clarification.

A biosketch reports [156]:

Micajah Pickett was born 25 December, 1748, in North Carolina. ... [He had] land and slaves in the northeast quarter of Fairfield County. ... [H]e left Kisannah ... in 1800, and began living with Susannah Johns in North Carolina. On March 27, 1800, Susannah Johns, ... a widow with one child, entered into an agreement (Buncombe County, North Carolina, records) with Micajah to live with him ... On Dec. 12, 1800, his wife, Kisannah, agreed to a legal separation (Fairfield County, South Carolina, records), and in 1805, Micajah agreed to provide $9,850 with interest for her at his death, plus various monies to four of their children. They already had, by deed of gift in 1800, transferred land and slaves to their oldest sons. ... in 1803 Micajah moved ... [to] the Green River where it is joined by Panther and Brights creeks (today at the western end of Lake Agder, in Polk Co, North Carolina). He accumulated 1,075 acres there while selling off his property along White Oak Creek. Micajah and Susannah Johns had six children born between 1801 and 1812 ... Between October 1811 and February 1812, Micajah brought 722 acres in upper Greenville County, South Carolina, along the North Fork of the Saluda River. He then relocated his residence there and added another 500 acres in 1815. .... Micajah's Greenville county property lay along the drover road, a primary migration route from upper South Carolina into frontier North Carolina over Saluda Gap, so he opened a tavern and public house to serve travellers. This was operated by Susannah Johns and her children: the oldest sons, Malachai and Joseph, also worked as overseers on Micajah's plantation. Charles Pickett, one of Micajah's sons by Kisannah, also lived with Micajah for a time and ran his mill. In December, 1833, Micajah died at his home in "Pickett's Valley", Greenville County, South Carolina. He left all his Greenville County lands to ... Jeptha, and Isiah, ... Susannah Johns ... returned to North Carolina. ... Jeptha sold his Greenville County inheritance to his older brother James Pickett, who moved there from Fairfield County, and, by legal agreement with the other brothers, brought Kisannah along to provide her room and board ... Lands left by Micajah in Buncombe County, North Carolina, and the Green River lands in Rutherford County, North Carolina, were sold at auction and the court paid the individuals of both families their due

Some researchers [157] suggest that Micajah Pickett, Sr. was the father of Micajah. Other researchers suggest that Micajah was the son of James Pickett, brother of Micajah Pickett, Sr. [Photocopy, This Pickett lineage suggests that a James Pickett was the father of Micajah Pickett, born 25 Dec. 1748. (citing a Lumpkin bible, among other documents).] [158]. We do not know which, if either, parentage for Micajah is correct. The ancestry through James Pickett conflates James Pickett Jr and James Pickett Sr. The ancestry through Micajah Pickett Sr is shown here. We seek further evidence to clarify this relationship. Perhaps DNA evidence will be useful, clarifying whether descendants of Micajah share DNA with the parents of Winifred Beasley or with the parents of Hannah Reynolds.

There are various spellings for the name of Micajah Pickett's wife: including Kisanna Hinson, Kizanna Hinson, Kizannah Henson, Rossana Rosanna (see father's will) Hinson. Born in Caroline County, previously Essex County, previously Old Rappahonnock County, Virginia. Her birth has been reported as both 1750 in Fairfield County, South Carolina and at St. David's Parish, South Carolina or Virginia or Anson County, North Carolina.

The transcription of the will of Philip Hinson has an ambiguous spelling for daughter Rosanna/Kizanna Pickett, which raises potential uncertainty about the ancestry of Kizanna Pickett, spouse of Micajah Pickett. DNA matches between descendants [20 in number, as of this writing] of Benjamin Hinson [son of Philip Hinson], and Robert Wolfe [descendant of Micajah and Kizanna Pickett] show many shared matches with descendants of Micajah and Kizanna Pickett and none with descendants of Micajah and Susanna Pickett. This suggests strongly that Kizanna Pickett was a descendant of Philip Hinson.

Several Anson County indentures involved men named Pickett, including the four dated 1768 for Micajah Pickett, Jr [159]

1777 In a deed dated Oct. 27, 1777, Micajah Pickett, of South Carolina, conveyed 100 acres in Anson County, northeast of the Pee Dee River [160]

Records to abstract:

Rutherford County deed index for Pickett. [161] [162]

There are many more deeds involving this Pickett family in Fairfield County, North Carolina which I have not yet abstracted. [163]

Greenville County Equity Court Records: [164]

1801 Joseph Shelton acknowledged a deed for 75 acres to Nancy Pickett at the Rutherford county court. Who was Nancy Pickett? [165]


Footnotes:

[1] County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions (Anson County, North Carolina), Anson County, North Carolina Deeds, H1-205, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[2] County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions (Anson County, North Carolina), Anson County, North Carolina Deeds, H1-210, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[3] County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions (Anson County, North Carolina), Anson County, North Carolina Deeds, H1-212, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[4] County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions (Anson County, North Carolina), Anson County, North Carolina Deeds, H1-216, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[5] Ethel Nerim Miner, Hanson, Henson, Hinson, Hynson and Allied Family Names, Vol. II (1993), 104, secondary source, perhaps citing a Daughters of the American Revolution publication, [GoogleBooks].

[6] South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Online abstract Ids have been changed. Search at first link and right-click image. Then Open Image in new tab to get the URL., Series S213184, Vol. 11, Page 379, Item 1, [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[7] South Carolina Royal land grants, 1731-1775; index, 1695-1775, 19-345, [FamilySearchImage], [FSCatalog].

[8] South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Online abstract Ids have been changed. Search at first link and right-click image. Then Open Image in new tab to get the URL., Series: S213019, Vol. 19-345, [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[9] South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Online abstract Ids have been changed. Search at first link and right-click image. Then Open Image in new tab to get the URL., [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[10] South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Online abstract Ids have been changed. Search at first link and right-click image. Then Open Image in new tab to get the URL., Series: S111001, memorial Vol. 10-154, dated May 27, [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[11] South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Online abstract Ids have been changed. Search at first link and right-click image. Then Open Image in new tab to get the URL., Series: S111001, Memorial, Vol. 10-231, Item 3, [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[12] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Survey map, [Image], [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[13] South Carolina Royal land grants, 1731-1775; index, 1695-1775, 21-40, [FamilySearchImage], [FSCatalog].

[14] South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Online abstract Ids have been changed. Search at first link and right-click image. Then Open Image in new tab to get the URL., [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[15] South Carolina land plats, 1731-1861, 10q-232, [FamilySearchImage], [FSCatalog].

[16] South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Online abstract Ids have been changed. Search at first link and right-click image. Then Open Image in new tab to get the URL., [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[17] Henry Mouzon, An accurate map of North and South Carolina (London, Printed for Robt. Sayer and J: Bennett, 1775), [LibraryOfCongress Map], [LibraryOfCongress].

[18] Brent H. Holcomb and Silas Emmett Lucas, Some South Carolina county records, Vol. 2 (Southern Historical Press, 1989), 89, [GoogleBooks].

[19] South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Online abstract Ids have been changed. Search at first link and right-click image. Then Open Image in new tab to get the URL., Series S213184, colonial platt 19-266, [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[20] South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Online abstract Ids have been changed. Search at first link and right-click image. Then Open Image in new tab to get the URL., S372001 Vol. 4G0-218 and 4H0-210, [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

[21] North Carolina. County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions (Anson County), Minute docket, 1771-1777, 1848-1858, 1868, 159, [FamilySearch Image].

[22] County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions (Anson County, North Carolina), Anson County, North Carolina Deeds, K-392, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[23] USGenWeb Archives, [USGenWeb].

[24] County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions (Anson County, North Carolina), Anson County, North Carolina Deeds, K-372, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[25] Fairfield County, South Carolina Deeds, H-72, [FamilySearchImage], [FSCatalog].

[26] South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Online abstract Ids have been changed. Search at first link and right-click image. Then Open Image in new tab to get the URL., S372001 Vol. 5B0-351, [Search1], [Search2], [Search3].

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