InterChange Transcript
Project II, Group 4, 2/2/95

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Kevin Tiernan:
Hey everyone for group four, how many of you have written your first draft and have it here? I left mine in my room, but I will post it tonight.

Paul Fau:
Hi I have my draft here today. I have a hard copy so if you want to read it I have it

Kevin Tiernan:
Just to let everyone know, my paper is about usenet groups on auotmobiles and there different aspects.

Paul Fau:
My draft is about the irc and what researched

Kevin Tiernan:
Paul I am reading your on e-mail, I will be back.

Paul Fau:
Is there anybody else here?

Corey Geer:
Hello. My research is based on college brats who hate BBSs like America Online and other .com addresses. Paul, I will read your draft on E-Mail too. I have no copy available of my draft but I will have it out by Friday.

Paul Fau:
My email is kind of mesed up though

Corey Geer:
Hey Paul, turn around and wave or something so I know who you are.

Wayne Butler:
Ok, the first thing you folks are going to need to do is figure out how you are going to share one another's texts.
You have several options:
1. You can exchange print outs if you have them.
2. You can read one another's drafts on e-mail.
3. You can exchange floppy diskettes and read the files in MS Word.
Once you have figured out how to exchange texts, take about 15 minutes or so to read one another's drafts.

Then,return to InterChange and begin a discussion of one another's drafts. Your goal is to collaboratively develop feedback for each writer that will help the writer expand, focus, structure or generally improve the draft.

Make sure you break up the time equally for each writer. You might structure your "conversation" around the following:
1. What works in the draft? What is your favorite part?
2. As a reader, what else would you like to know? Where within the draft could you as a reader use more information?
3. Given our on-line conversation the other day about "good writing," what would you say this draft needs to become a good peice of writing?
Also, the writers should feel free to ask questions. Often the writers' own questions about their drafts can help guide the feedback conversation.

Kevin Tiernan:
Paul when i read your paper I notice you focus on two things, getting away from yourself and being excepted by a group. I think you need to go into more detail on why people need to get away from their own lives and to change their names. Do you think they do it just because they are bored in real life or do you think they don't want to actualy talk just see what people think of there changing. Also you should include more about why people on the canadian channell treat you like an outcast, wether it is because you are American or because you are new. You should make note of this know and see if their opions of you change over time. Finnally I have noticed some small gramatical errors but I think you can catch these or when it gets to the second draft someone else or myself will point them out on paper becasue it is so hard to do without pointing or showing you.

Kevin Tiernan:
Paul I guess since you don't have much to talk about and since you are the only one with a draft I will e-mal you a message when I turn my paper in so you remeber to read it. Do you have any specific questions about your first draft?

Paul Fau:
I see, this paper was written just last night and I didn't have real time to look over the paper for grammatical error, I just started typing. I suppose that I really took this paper in a narrative form more than critical

Paul Fau:
Iam going to look at the paper now I wiil be back

Becky Rickly:
Kevin--But if Paul goes into more detail about why people need to get away from their own lives, will he be going off tangent as far as examining the electronic community? Maybe if he does it ONLY in the context of THAT community.....

Wayne Butler:
Remember folks, for this first round of feedback on first drafts, we want to focus on content, focus, structure, and organization rather than sentence level concerns such as clarity, style, and correctness.

Corey Geer:
Paul, I tried to point out the errors in your paper -- but I'm not real good at that anyway. I wrote down a few things I thought you should include:

*References to Rheingold
*More examples of dialog and actuall interchange
*Are there regulars on this IRC, and what are there characters like?
*Is this channel something you would recommend?
*How do you get there?
These are just a few things off the top of my head that I would be interested in knowing. I'm going to bring your paper back now.

Kevin Tiernan:
Good point, I think that is what I meant but if he limits himself to the group he must make sure he points that out so that people don't perceive his opions about the individual groups too be that of his opions about all.

Corey Geer:
Hey Kevin, what kind of cars do you like?

Paul Fau:
What is supposed to be the real focus for this paper? I just started typing with really any notion of where I was going.

Kevin Tiernan:
Does anyone know if Jesse ackles is in the class today??? I really liked his paper and wanted to knwo what everyone else thought but I can't find what group he is in.

Paul Fau:
What does Jesse look like?

Becky Rickly:
Paul, you're to do an analysis of this electronic community....so I'm assuming you can choose to focus in on whatever interests you, or whatever you think is important.

Corey Geer:
I'm not sure who he is.

Paul Fau:
I am goin to read his paper.

Kevin Tiernan:
Corey: I was off for a second reading e-mail... Anyways I like all cars but me and my friends back home are working on my friends 68' Barracuda. It is bad right know but it will look great by the end . My friend and his dad do most of the work but my freinds and I help with some.

Corey Geer:
Paul, have you read the E-Mail Dr. Butler sent to us recently answering some basic questions about the paper?

Kevin Tiernan:
I tried to base my first draft off the questions he rasied in that e-mail message and the original assignment.

Corey Geer:
Kevin, what kind of stuff do they talk about in the Auto newsgroups?

Kevin Tiernan:
Corey your paper has been forwarded so I am gonna read it.

Kevin Tiernan:
I focused on three groups antiques so I can talk about the barracuda and that same persons Honda 72' coupe the smallest car I have ever seen, misc. where they talk about raod tests, how to reant cars, just general questions and answers about when and what to buy, what is a fair price. Stuff like that. Finnally rod-custom where it is real in depth and I have no clue what they are talking about, they talk about engine types and using NO2 and blowers.

Wayne Butler:
Corey,
You told Paul he should have more references to Rheingold and more examples of dialogue. What parts of Rheingold would you recommend for what parts of his draft? Exactly what kinds of dialouge at what point in his paper for what purpose should he include them?

Kevin Tiernan:
Corey, I am a bit confused about what your usenet channel is and what it involves.

Kevin Tiernan:
Heeellllllooooooooooo

Paul Fau:
Hi I am back

Paul Fau:
I read Jesse's paper and I thought that it was very informative with respect to the ircf

Kevin Tiernan:
I kept leaving and coming and I was never sure if i missed anything until I posted something and saw that I didn't.

Wayne Butler:
Has anyone figured out how to capture transcripts of IRC sessions, yet? If so, please share your tips and techniques with the whole class on infohighway. Seems we have a lot of folks doing IRC and they might be interested in the information.

Kevin Tiernan:
I thought his paper had one major thing which will allow him to get his paper where it needs to be. A specific focus area, he is talking about one issue with examples and this is a great start.

Paul Fau:
He was very critical in terms of how he viewed the irc

Paul Fau:
DO you know how to save the dialogues from the irc

Paul Fau:
Corey, i read the mail but there were so many suggestions, Has your paper been forwarded.

Corey Geer:
Here is what I have for my paper:

Corey Geer
Project II -- Analyzing A Virtual Community
In the information age, where cyberspace technology is leading the way in supplying the information to us, communities have developed to establish a common ground between the person, the computer, and the information. These virtual communities have played major roles in keeping people connected to the internet and in creating new friends, new enemies, and in simply giving information freely. Howard Rheingold, in The Virtual Community, belongs to such a community called the WELL. He sums up very well how the WELL, like other communities, effect itÕs members in saying:

IÕm not alone in this emotional attachment to an apparently bloodless technological ritual. Millions of people on every continent also participate in the computer-mediated social groups known as virtual communities, and this population is growing fast. Finding the WELL was like discovering a cozy little world that had been flourishing without me, hidden within the walls of my house; an entire cast of characters welcomed me to the troupe with great merriment as soon as I found the secret door. Like others who fell into the WELL, I soon discovered that I was audience, performer, and scriptwriter, along with my companions, in an ongoing improvisation. A full-scale subculture was growing on the other side of my telephone jack, and they invited me to help create something new.

I, however, have found a different type a community to be part of. This particular community is one which deals (in a harsh way I might add) with the .com addresses on the internet like America Online and the .edu addresses like U of M. I found this community on the Usenet and I hope to convey the attitudes, people, and characteristics of this community to you.

Clock:
At the tone the time will be 11:26

Clock:
11:26:20

Corey Geer:
It's just my intro (well, what my intro might be like). What's that clock thing?

Clock:
11:27

Clock:
LAter

To return to the Part Two page, click here.

Contact wbutler@umich
with comments or questions.

Modified: 3/4/95