CV [PDF] | Job Market Paper [PDF] | Research Statement [PDF] | Teaching Summary [PDF] | Research | Teaching | Awards | Conferences

Biography

I am a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Economics at the University of Michigan. I will be on the Job Market in 2013-2014 and I will be attending the ASSA meetings in Philadelphia from January 3-5, 2014. I expect to complete the requirements for the PhD in April 2014. I originally hail from Claremont, California and I attended Denison University for my undergraduate education, where I majored in Mathematics, Economics, and Spanish. My fields of study are labor economics, law and economics, entrepreneurship, industrial organization, applied microeconomics, and personnel economics.

I am currently interested in the impacts of covenants not to compete, which are common in employment contracts for many types of workers ranging from CEOs to non-profit volunteers. States differ widely in their enforcement of these agreements and while the welfare impacts of enforcement are largely unknown, they are likely to be sizable. My job market paper theoretically and empirically evaluates the impact of non-compete enforcement on firm-sponsored training. My second chapter investigates the impact of non-compete enforcement on the creation, growth, and survival of spin-outs and other new ventures. My other works in progress consider the impact of noncompete enforcement on job-lock, as well as the impact of physician carve-outs on the creation, growth, and survival of new medical practices, physician mobility, and wages. I am also in the process of administering a survey on the American Life Panel to gauge the incidence of non-competes across a broad array of occupations, how workers perceive their enforceability, and how they affect worker mobility decisions.

Research





Research Statement [PDF]
  • ''Training the Enemy? Firm-Sponsored Training and the Enforcement of Covenants Not to Compete'' (Job Market Paper) [ | Paper PDF ]

    This paper presents the first estimates of the impact of the enforcement of covenants not to compete (``non-competes'') on firm-sponsored training. Introducing non-compete enforcement into the classic two-period training model shows that the often presumed positive relationship between firm-sponsored training and enforcement relies on whether training is contractible. The empirical analysis shows that a one standard deviation increase in enforcement leads to a relative increase in firm-sponsored training of 3 percent for occupations that experience relatively more non-compete litigation. In each of the first 20 years of employment, this relative impact is between 2 and 8 percent. The relative training effect is 5 percent for workers aged 22 to 44 and is localized in high earning and high skill occupations.



  • ''Creation, Growth, and Destruction: The Life-Cycle Impact of Enforcing Covenants Not to Compete on Spin-Outs and Other New Ventures,'' with Natarajan Balasubramanian and Mariko Sakakibara. [ | Paper PDF | Presentation PDF ]

    We use matched employer-employee data on 30 US states to examine the impact of enforcing non-compete covenants (CNCs) on the life cycle of new firms. Using a difference-in-difference-in-difference specification with law firms and new firms that are not within-industry spinouts as the baseline, we find states with stricter enforcement of CNCs tend to have fewer, larger, faster growing, and longer-lived within-industry spinouts. These results are consistent with CNC enforcement having a selection effect on within-industry spinouts.



  • ''Incidence, Knowledge, Perceptions, and Experiences: A Survey of Employment Non-Competition Agreements,'' with JJ Prescott and Norman Bishara [ ]

    We survey respondents on the American Life Panel about their knowledge, perceptions, and experiences with covenants not to compete (non-competes) to fill crucial gaps in our knowledge about the incidence of non-competes across a broad array of occupations, how non-competes are utilized by employers, what benefits, if any, workers typically receive from signing them, how workers view their enforceability, how they affect mobility decisions.



  • ''Locked In? The Impact of Non-Compete Enforcement on the Duration of Employment Spells'' [ ]

    Using a novel index of non-compete enforcement, this paper provides the first estimates of the impact of non-compete enforcement on the duration of employment spells using the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). Because non-competes typically restrict employees from moving to competitors in the same industry, this paper utilizes a difference-in-differences approach that compares the effect of non-compete enforcement between occupations that are highly concentrated within an industry to occupations which appear frequently in multiple industries. I also examine heterogeneous treatment effects by occupation and starting potential experience.



  • ''Free to Practice? An Event Study of Physician Carve-Outs from Non-Compete Enforcement,'' with Natarajan Balasubramanian and Mariko Sakakibara [ ]

    Using an event study framework, this paper provides the first empirical estimates of the impact of state policies prohibiting the enforcement of covenants not to compete for physicians on the creation, growth, and performance of new practices, physician mobility, and wages. Using data from the LBD we construct a list of new practices. Using the LEHD we not only identify which of those practices were started by a physician who left a prior employer, but also track the mobility and wages of physicians before and after the carve-outs were enacted.

Teaching





Teaching Summary [PDF]

Teaching Philosophy [PDF]

Raw Evaluations [PDF]

Teaching Recommendation [PDF]
Instructor: Univ. of Michigan and National Univ. of Singapore, School of Business
  • International Macroeconomics (Undergraduate), National University of Singapore
    Winter 2011
  • Managerial Economics (Undergraduate), National University of Singapore
    Winter 2011 and Fall 2010
  • Introduction to Macroeconomics (Undergraduate), University of Michigan
    Summer 2008
Graduate Student Instructor (TA): University of Michigan
  • Applied Microeconometrics (Graduate)
    Fall 2012 with Prof. Jeffrey Smith
  • Introduction to Microeconomics (Undergraduate)
    Winter 2012 with Dr. Chad Hogan
  • Intermediate Macroeconomics (Undergraduate)
    Winter 2010 with Prof. Chris House
  • Intermediate Microeconomics (Undergraduate)
    Winter 2009 and Fall 2009 with Prof. Tilman Borgers
  • Introduction to Macroeconomics (Undergraduate)
    Fall 2008 with Prof. Pavel Kapinos
  • Government Regulation of Industry (Undergraduate)
    Winter 2008 with Prof. Jim Adams

Fellowships and Awards





  • OVPR Matching Grant of $15,000 for Non-Compete Survey
  • SYLLF Fellowship, Winter 2014
  • Mitre Economics Travel Grant, Summer 2013
  • Rackham Research Award, Summer 2013
  • Mitre Economics Research Award, Spring 2013
  • Rackham Graduate School One-Term Fellowship, Winter 2013
  • Rackham Travel Grant, Winter 2013
  • Completed Preparing Future Faculty Program through the Michigan Center for Research on Learning and Teaching (CRLT), Summer 2012
  • Michigan Economics Society Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor, 2009-2010 Academic Year
  • Letters of Commendation for Excellent Teaching, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Winter 2010
  • Research Grant, Department of Economics, Summer 2008 and 2009

Conferences and Presentations





  • Business Economics and Public Policy, Kelley School of Business, Indiana University
    Presenter: Training the Enemy? Firm-Sponsored Training and the Enforcement of Covenants Not to Compete, Ann Arbor, MI, November 2013.
  • Industrial Organization Seminar, University of Michigan
    Presenter: Training the Enemy? Firm-Sponsored Training and the Enforcement of Covenants Not to Compete, Ann Arbor, MI, November 2013.
  • Zwerdling Labor Seminar, University of Michigan
    Presenter: Training the Enemy? Firm-Sponsored Training and the Enforcement of Covenants Not to Compete, Ann Arbor, MI, September 2013.
  • Research Data Center Conference (Census), Atlanta Federal Reserve Bank
    Presenter: Creation, Growth, and Destruction: The Life-Cycle Impact of Enforcing Covenants Not to Compete on Spin-Outs and Other New Ventures, with Natarajan Balasubramanian and Mariko Sakakibara, Atlanta, GA, September 2013 .
  • EconCon 2013, Columbia University
    Presenter: Training the Enemy? The Effect of the Enforcement of Covenants Not to Compete on Firm Sponsored Training Choices, New York, NY, August 2013 .
  • London Business School Trans-Atlantic Doctoral Conference
    Presenter: Training the Enemy? The Effect of the Enforcement of Covenants Not to Compete on Firm Sponsored Training Choices, London, UK, May 2013.
  • Midwestern Economics Association
    Presenter: Training the Enemy? The Effect of the Enforcement of Covenants Not to Compete on Firm Sponsored Training Choices, Columbus, OH, March 2013.
  • Labor Seminar, University of Michigan
    Presenter: Non-Compete Enforcement and Firm-Sponsored Training, Ann Arbor, MI, December 2012.
  • Labor Search Seminar, University of Michigan
    Presenter: Firm Search, Labor Constraints, and Equilibrium Wage Dispersion, Ann Arbor, MI July 2012.
  • Industrial Organization Seminar, University of Michigan
    Presenter: The Person is the Product: The Role of Client-Employee Loyalty in Labor Mobility Decisions, Ann Arbor, MI, November 2011.