the all-seeingeye Pangur Ban: 28' Sharpie
Construction Diary

2003:

July 4 - 13

July 16 - 20

July 21 - 27

July 28 - Aug. 3

August 4 - 22

August 23 - 31

September

October

November
December

2004:

March

April

May

June

July

August

Rollover

September

October November

December

2005:

February

March

April

May

June-August

September

October

2006:

March

July-August

September

October

2007:

April-May

June

July

August

September

October

2008:

January

February

May

July

September

References Technical Notes Egrets and the Commodore

July-August 2006

Have managed to get the hatch cover completed, and begun painting the hull. The cockpit is complete. Pretty soon it will be time to start attaching all of the hardware that makes a boat work. And then there is the issue of spars and sails.

Lots of little details are coming together. Here is the bronze rod for the mooring bits. The grooves will give a grip for the epoxy which will be injected into the hole you can see in the face of the bit. The cockpit is almost finished out. I've been painting in the odd moment between prepping the house for painting and working on the landscaping.

Cockpit, except for the sole, is painted. The ventilated drop boards fit well enough. The openings will have a screen and retaining ring set in a rabbet on the back side.

Some views of the centerboard pivot support. Metal parts are bronze.

Epoxy coating the centerboard.

Scarfing the lumber for rub rails. This is the last major woodworking on the hull itself. What remains is some trim work and finishing up inside the cabin. The rub rails were a good test of the scarfing jig I slapped together. I may need it for the masts-if I can't find a convenient source of 26 foot long boards.

The rub rails are now dry-fit to the hull, held on by lag bolts. When finally attached, the lag bolts will be gone and the rails held on with screws and 5200. The upper edge slopes at 15 degrees, and the lower at 45 degrees, per George Buehler's recommendations. (they are smaller than the massive logs George prefers, however) Between the rub rail, the inch of plywood, and the sheer clamp backing all of it up, I'd place good money on this hull against a GRP boat in a game of marina tag.

This is a shot of my improvised spar bench. Basically nothing more than some pads glued to the floor with some cross pieces to give clamping room. Thankfully, the guy who laid the garage floor some 44 years ago knew what he was doing. That thing is flat and level. When I'm done, a couple whacks with a cold chisel should get the pads back off. The diagonal dimension of the garage is just a few feet longer than the longest mast.