the all-seeingeye Pangur Ban: 28' Sharpie
Construction Diary

2003:

July 4 - 13

July 16 - 20

July 21 - 27

July 28 - Aug. 3

August 4 - 22

August 23 - 31

September

October

November
December

2004:

March

April

May

June

July

August

Rollover

September

October November

December

2005:

February

March

April

May

June-August

September

October

2006:

March

July-August

September

October

2007:

April-May

June

July

August

September

October

2008:

January

February

May

July

September

References Technical Notes Egrets and the Commodore

August 2004

Why build a boat? The Voice told me anyone without a boat was in BIG trouble.

Polyethylene stand-offs for ballast bricks.

August 1

Began the final sanding of the lower hull today. Still another round at least to get it to where I'll be happy.

Took a break to test out an idea I had for allowing for water and air circulation around the ballast bricks. I didn't want the bricks resting directly on the hull-that would tend to trap moisture. At the same time I really didn't want to have to build an elaborate track system. Instead, I think I'll add little polyethylene feet to the bottom of the bricks. It turns out not even to be necessary to pre-drill for the nails. Ring-shank bronze nails can simply be hammered in.


Primed and painted hull.

The cradle/sledge.

Cradle supporting hull.

August 9

Began the paint job on the hull last week. Only the bottom needs to be finished at this time, as it is the only section that will be completely inaccessible once the hull is right side up. The sides are primed, and will be finished along with the topsides.

Roll-over is fast approaching, so it was time to build the cradle and start to figure out the steps needed to get it out of the garage, right side up, and back into the garage. I've decided to modify the cradle by adding a framework to support the hull from inside. The cradle will then roll on sections of 3/4 inch iron pipe. After I got the cradle in place and the framework done, I jacked up the bow and cut away the stem extension which has been supporting the bow. Did the same at the stern, leaving the hull supported only by the cradle.

For the first time since construction began, the boat is no longer part of the building around her. She moves. The next chore will be figuring out how to roll her over.


Roll-Over Day! This was the scene at the end of the day. See how it was done. (very photo-intensive pages follow)

Trimming the top of the sheer clamp to match the curve of the deck beams.

August 14-15

Thirteen months into construction, and the hull is at last upright. The rollover was, um, interesting. I'm pleased to say that not only is the boat upright and intact, but all my limbs remain attached and whole as well. The rollover crew numbered two, myself and my wife. She was mostly there to help move stuff around, pull on the second winch handle when two were in use, and keep 911 on speed dial if things went splat. The job could have been done with only one person, but would have taken a few more hours.

So, what about the rollover worked and what didn't? For starters I under built the rollover frame. Bigger plywood gussets with a lot heavier screws-maybe bolts-even for areas you don't think will take any weight. If you have the budget, the frame could be circular rather than rectangular, but that would eat up a lot of plywood and time. It would, however, mean you needed less force to roll the assembly. What worked best, though, was the dishwashing liquid lubricated MDF under the cradle. I could slide the boat and cradle anywhere I wanted to entirely by myself. If I had it to do again, I might buy some 1/4 inch hardboard and pave the driveway with it. Masonry nails to hold the sheets down and lots of soap for slippery. Might have to get some climber's crampons for my shoes though.

The best thing, though, was that I'd visualized the process over and over-almost from the moment I lofted the boat. This was merely the last of several hundred rollovers. By the time I was done I'd isolated the individual steps needed, and made sure my process allowed a break between each step to sit back and refine the next one. I allowed two days to accomplish the job, though I suspected I'd only need one. Lacking a timeline, and keeping a deliberate pace contributed to the safety and sanity of the day. It took an entire 10 hour day, including building the roll over frame from scratch.

The next day I built new panels to fill in around and inside the hull at the garage door opening, and started to trim the sheer to match the curve of the deck beams.

August 20-22

The sheers are beveled to their final angle. The mortises for the deck beams are cut, as are all of the beam-end tenons. The beams have been dry-fit, and the first 8 epoxied in place.

Even though the boat doesn't call for them, I made two full-width beam laminations. These are useful for checking things like the sheer bevel angle, and are being used now to align and secure the short beams in place while the epoxy sets.

This will be my last full weekend for working on the boat until at least January. Classes begin again next week, and one is scheduled for Saturday mornings.

August 30

Finished gluing in the deck beams over the weekend. Milled the rough stock for the floor timbers and began to shape them. Next on the agenda is to paint the inside of the hull with epoxy, install the floor timbers and begin the two bulkheads.

Construction Diary

2003:

July 4 - 13

July 16 - 20

July 21 - 27

July 28 - Aug. 3

August 4 - 22

August 23 - 31

September

October

November
December

2004:

March

April

May

June

July

August

Rollover

September

October November

December

2005:

February

March

April

May

June-August

September

October

2006:

March

July-August

September

October

2007:

April-May

June

July

August

September

October

2008:

January

February

May

July

September

References Technical Notes Egrets and the Commodore