the all-seeingeye Pangur Ban: 28' Sharpie
Construction Diary

2003:

July 4 - 13

July 16 - 20

July 21 - 27

July 28 - Aug. 3

August 4 - 22

August 23 - 31

September

October

November
December

2004:

March

April

May

June

July

August

Rollover

September

October November

December

2005:

February

March

April

May

June-August

September

October

2006:

March

July-August

September

October

2007:

April-May

June

July

August

September

October

2008:

January

February

May

July

September

References Technical Notes Egrets and the Commodore

July 16, 2003

Got the first section of the keelson secured to the stem piece. I had read a number of folks who use drywall screws as temporary fasteners when using epoxy. I had my doubts about this, as I've sheared the heads in the stem came out clean. I had envisioned all sorts of complicated clamping arrangements for the hull laminations which may now be completely unnecessary.

Rules to live by:

1: No matter your choice in Miracle Snot-you will get sticky, get used to it.

2: Measure it again stupid!

3: Workboat finish!

July 17, 2003

Began keelson laminations. Experience on the last project-unintended gluing of parts to sawhorses-indicated the need for poly sheeting under everything.

July 18-20, 2003

Cutting notches for the sheer stringers in the stern lamination. Fiddled with power plane and chisels, but ended up using an adze. Sometimes the old ways are still the best. . .

The first sheer stringer lamination being fitted to the stern lamination. Took a bit of twisting to get the 2 1/4 X 3/4 douglas fir to lie down. A pipe wrench and a ratchet tie-down did the trick.

One of the disadvantages of working on a boat in a confined space is that you can't step back and see the whole as easily. If you can set up in a place with an unobstructed view, measuring errors and slightly unfair curves will stand out-besides, it helps keep you on track if you can step back and admire your own work once in a while.

Boats will speak to those who listen. On a good day they murmur with contentment as you ghost along in the breeze. The loudest thing they seem to say is : Don't do that stupid!

Today she spoke as a boat for the first time. I was bending the sheer stringer to fit prepositioned blocks on the molds. The process went like this: Clamp one end to a mold, walk the board inward to the next mold, clamp, and repeat going aft. I was was about three-quarters along and tightening a clamp when one of the first clamps let go and fell to the floor with a clang. Sigh. Back to the mold, reclamp. Back to the other end, continue to tighten. Clang. Go back and reclamp. back to the other end. Clang. Get pissed off, and take a step back. Look backalong boat to where the clamp has fallen again . . . and you know, that sheer looks pretty fair just where it is, rather than where I wanted it. Take fifteen minutes to check lofting-and discover 1 inch error in that mold. Look at boat, hear I told you so!