the all-seeingeye Pangur Ban: 28' Sharpie
Construction Diary

2003:

July 4 - 13

July 16 - 20

July 21 - 27

July 28 - Aug. 3

August 4 - 22

August 23 - 31

September

October

November
December

2004:

March

April

May

June

July

August

Rollover

September

October November

December

2005:

February

March

April

May

June-August

September

October

2006:

March

July-August

September

October

2007:

April-May

June

July

August

September

October

2008:

January

February

May

July

September

References Technical Notes Egrets and the Commodore

Bill Schwicker's twin-centerboard version of Egret.

Back in 1984 WoodenBoat published an article featuring the plans for Ralph M. Munroe's "Egret". (WoodenBoat #56,Plan 400-042 Also in Fifty Wooden Boats)They accompanied an article by Bill Schwicker which showed his plywood and epoxy interpretation of the boat. I must have been impressionable, and the article was very well written, because I've carried it around ever since. Now and again I'd take it out and think about it real hard, but circumstances never allowed me to get serious. That article was, I think, the first time I'd seen a story about someone with modest resources building a full-sized boat. Two years ago, I bought the plans. It's time to make it happen. Since the web page for my last boatbuilding project went over pretty well, I thought I'd post a construction log for this one as well.

July 4, 2003: So, you're building a boat in your garage ya daft bastard!

Lofting the molds on brown paper duct-taped to the studio floor.

Work has begun at last-almost a year behind my original schedule. Despite this, I'm still hoping for a launch date sometime in the fall of 2004. Lofted and built almost half of the molds today, with a trip to the lumberyard thrown in for good measure. I'm lucky that I've spent most of my adult life drafting. The three-dimensional twists at the stern post would have been a challenge otherwise.

The problem is going to be where to build it. I'd rather not build outdoors when I've already got a very well levelled surface-but the garage is too short by about eight feet and a bit narrow, given that the molds are about two feet wider than the planned 7'2" beam. All in all, though, I'd really like to work indoors whenever possible, so I'll try to squeeze the thing into the garage somehow.

July 5 and 6, 2003

The molds being set up in the garage. There is another 8 feet of boat that will stick out into the driveway.

Now that the midships mold is made I can see the magnitude of the space problem. Finished the molds and started the preliminary assembly of the strongback. With a little creativity I think I can clear enough space around the molds to work in. I'm also pretty certain I've got a way to hang the boat out the garage door, and close the opening around the hull. We'll see.

July 9, 2003

Laminating the third of four layers of 3/4 inch fir plywood to make the stern post.

Added a few more diagonals to the strongback, and started to laminate the stern post.

July 13, 2003

To say that I'm building a boat in my garage may not be entirely accurate. Perhaps through the garage would better describe it.

There is a certain "muscle memory" from my last project at work on this one. The first small boat is a great confidence builder. Many of the decisions on a small boat are the same on a larger one. Having made them once before (then fixed them and remade them) there is a lot less backing up going on with this project. Because of that experience I'm seeing potential problems (most of them anyway) before they're set in epoxy.

Notes for mold construction.

A bit of planning ahead put one of the molds exactly in the garage door. It was an easy task to fill in the mold with plywood and make a couple of triangular "wings" to fill in around the hull. Disabling the door opener lets me lock the assembly in place for security.

A lot of folks substitute fine sawdust for commercial epoxy additives. My experience has been that it works fine for general lamination and fillets in concealed areas, but it sets up like iron and shouldn't be used for exposed work or fairing because of its texture. Most power tools create a range of particle size, much of which is too coarse to use in this way, so just picking a handful up from the floor is not a good idea. A couple minutes of sifting with a standard window screen yields a gallon of fine sawdust. If I do this each time I clean up the shop, I should have enough saved up before I start the major laminations. (Oh, yeah, one other thing, wood fiber seems to contribute to the epoxy heating up-put any leftover mixed epoxy outdoors on a heat/fire proof surface. A quarter-cup of the stuff in the bottom of a yogurt cup gets smoking hot in about twenty minutes)

Construction Diary

2003:

July 4 - 13

July 16 - 20

July 21 - 27

July 28 - Aug. 3

August 4 - 22

August 23 - 31

September

October

November
December

2004:

March

April

May

June

July

August

Rollover

September

October November

December

2005:

February

March

April

May

June-August

September

October

2006:

March

July-August

September

October

2007:

April-May

June

July

August

September

October

2008:

January

February

May

July

September

References Technical Notes Egrets and the Commodore