QUANTUM OPTICS & QUANTUM INFORMATION


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Group members

  • Faculty

 

Luming Duan

Enrico Fermi Collegiate Professor

 

Department of Physics
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109                                 

Tel:  ++1 734 763-3179
Fax: ++1 626 764-5153
Email: lmduan@umich.edu

Web: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~lmduan/

 

CV

List of publications

Luming Duan

  • Graduate students and postdocs:
    • Zhe-Xuan Gong
    • Yang-Hao Chan
    • Chao Shen
    • Zhen Zhang
    • Dong-Ling Deng
    • Sheng-Tao Wang
  • Former group members:
    • Wei Yi, Shi-Liang-Zhu, Khan Mahmud, Timothy Bodiya, Bin Wang, Xiong Jin, Zhaohui Wei, Zhangqi Yin, Wei Zhang, Tim Goodman, Jason Kestner, Guin-Dar Lin, Yong-Jian Han, Yue Wu, Emily Lichko

 



Research

  •  Research Overview

 

    • Quantum Information Science

Our research focuses on theory and implementation of quantum information science. Quantum information science investigates how to characterize the mysterious concept of "entanglement" arising from quantum mechanics, how to use it as a resource for applications in various information processing tasks, and how to achieve better understanding of quantum many-body systems based on this concept. One main task of quantum information science is to find physical implementations in which quantum entanglement can be created and manipulated at will for realization of super-fast quantum computation or for secure quantum communication and cryptography. Our group is pursuing innovative ideas and theoretical schemes to advance implementation of quantum information in various kinds of physical systems.

 

    • Physics of ultracold atoms

The primary interest of our group lies in study of strongly correlated many-body phenomena arising from the ultracold atomic system. Investigation of ultracold bosonic or fermionic atomic gas remains one of the most active fields of physics ever since the achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation in 1995. Recently, studies in this field evolve into a new phase when the interactions between the atoms can be manipulated at will to realize various kinds of strongly correlated many-body systems. Compared with condensed matter materials, this atomic system has the advantage that complicated strongly correlated physics can be studied under highly controllable environments thanks to its unparalleled controllability and diversity.

 



Teaching



Service



Links