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PRESS COVERAGE

Please click on a link below to view the Press Coverage online:

Cosmic Cocktail Shaker

 

"Cosmologist’s ‘Cosmic Cocktail’ is a refreshing read"
Science News - August 23, 2014

Katherine Freese explores dark matter and other mysterious parts of the universe. Review by Andrew Grant.

(Click here to download the publication as an Adobe PDF file)







Times Higher Education Logo

 

The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter, by Katherine Freese
Times Higher Education - July 10, 2014

Virginia Trimble on the search for the mysterious, magical secret ingredient of the universe.


Cosmic Cocktail Shaker

 

"Review: The Cosmic Cocktail"
AstroGuyz - July 4, 2014

It’s the hottest topic in modern astrophysics. What exactly is dark matter and dark energy? It is kind of amazing to think that astrophysicists do not yet completely understand just what most of the universe is made of.

And author Katherine Freese is on the forefront of this hunt, as she relates in her new book, The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter out from Princeton Press.




BBC Sky at Night Logo

 

The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter
BBC Sky at Night Magazine - 2014

Review by Nicky Guttridge, a science journalist and Hubble public information officer.


Katherine Freese

 

"Katie Freese Receives Grant from Swedish Research Council, VR"
The Oskar Klein Centre blog - June 24, 2014

Katie Freese was announced as the new Director of Nordita, which is located in the neighbouring building to the Oskar Klein Centre. She was also awarded a big excellence grant for astroparticle physics by the Swedish Research Council, VR, and will receive 101 million Swedish Crowns (around 15 million US dollars) over 10 years.





Katherine Freese in a boa

 

"What the universe is made of (probably) narrated by a boa wearing physicist"
Washington Post - June 2, 2014

If the cocktail shaker on the cover doesn’t convince you that “The Cosmic Cocktail” might be an unusually entertaining physics book, maybe the lavender feather boa that author Katherine Freese wears for her dust-jacket photo will.

(Click here to download the publication as an Adobe PDF file)





Cosmic Cocktail Shaker

 

"Review: The Cosmic Cocktail"
The Space Review - June 2, 2014

Freese suggests in the book that “any time now, the question of the dark matter may be answered” by any one of the wide range of experimental approaches.

(Click here to download the publication as an Adobe PDF file)





Katherine Freese Photo New Scientist   "A straight-talking woman's guide to dark matter"
NewScientist - June 16, 2014

Physicist Katherine Freese drinks deep of her life's adventures and cosmic mysteries alike in her captivatingly frank book The Cosmic Cocktail.

Katherine Freese Photo New Scientist   "UM Physicist On Her Big Bang Model’s Validation: ‘Woo hoo!’"
CBS WWJ-TV 62 Detroit - March 20, 2014

Freese’s “natural inflation” model, which she describes as much simpler than some of its failed counterparts, will serve as a starting point for scientists to deepen their understanding of inflation and the earliest universe.

The Biggest News in the Universe   "The Biggest News in the Universe"
College of LSA, University of Michigan - June 2, 2014

Einstein guessed at gravitational waves a century ago. The idea of inflation was conceived in 1981. The concepts were mathematically sound, but no one had uncovered tangible evidence to confirm these leaps of imagination. So while it was solid theory, it was also, in a way, pretend.

(Click here to download the publication as an Adobe PDF file)

Katherine Freese Die Zeit 2013

 

"Scotland Dark jagt Mister Wimp"
page 28, by: Robert Gast - Feburary 28, 2013

Physiker sind in einen einzigartigen Kriminalfall verstrickt: Sie wollen die rätselhafte Dunkle Materie, die seit dem Urknall im Kosmos ihr Unwesen treibt, endlich dingfest machen. Allzu viele Verstecke bleiben ihr nicht mehr

(Click here to download the publication as an Adobe PDF file)

(Click here to download the 2nd page as an Adobe PDF file)





Katherine Freese Photo Science News January 2013

 

"Light in the Dark"
by: Tom Siegfried - December 27, 2012
Scientists may be on the brink of identifying a mysterious form of matter. For decades, astronomers have grappled with their inability to decipher the universe's darkest secret: the identity of most of its matter.

 

Katherine Freese Washington Post News December 2012

 

"DNA May Help Scientists Find 'Dark Matter,' the Glue that Binds Galaxies"
by: Brian Vastag - December 3, 2012
That wonder molecule of life on Earth, DNA, is now being enlisted in the search for an exotic species zooming through the cosmos: dark matter.

 

Katherine Freese Photo Science News October 2012

 

"Hunting Dark Matter with DNA"
by: Tanya Lewis - October 31, 2012
Physicists racing to detect the mysterious substance known as dark matter are thinking outside the box by looking inside the cell. A new proposal for tracking dark matter particles relies on strands of DNA. All the ordinary stuff in the universe, from the atoms in people to the hot plasma in stars, makes up only about 5 percent of the universe’s mass and energy.

 


Katherine Freese Photo Wired Julyl 2012

 

"Gold and DNA Could Create New Dark Matter Detector"
by: Wired UK - July 03, 2012
A combined team of physicists and biologists aim to build a directional dark matter detector using strands of DNA and gold.

 

Katherine Freese Photo Space.com April 2012

 

"Dark Matter May Collide With Atoms Inside You More Often Than Thought,"
by: Charles Q. Choi - April 27, 2012
"Before we did these calculations, I had been under the impression that on the average, one WIMP would hit one of the nuclei in a human body in about 100 years. In fact I used to joke about the 'WIMP death theory,'" said researcher Katherine Freese, a theoretical physicist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. "Instead, it turns out that the number of WIMP interactions would be so much more frequent — as many as one per minute."

 

Katherine Freese Photo National Geographic April 2012

 

"Dark Matter Hits the Average Human Once a Minute?"
by: Jason Major - April 24, 2012
But WIMPs of certain masses can collide with atomic nuclei on occasion—and now it appears such collisions might happen more often than previously thought. "Before we did this work, I thought a WIMP collided with one of your nuclei once in your lifetime," said Katherine Freese, a professor with the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics at the University of Michigan. "Turns out it's more likely to be one a minute."

 

Katherine Freese Photo Popular Mechanics June 2011

 

"Four Ways Scientists Are Trying to Figure Out Dark Matter and Dark Energy"
by: By Skylar Bergl - June 3, 2011
Ninety-six percent of the universe is unknown to humans—scientists can see the effects of dark matter and dark energy, but not directly detect either one. Last night at the World Science Festival in New York, some of the most interesting minds studying these puzzling phenomena gathered to discuss how they're trying to get a handle on the vast majority of the universe that's invisible to the naked eye.

 

Katherine Freese Photo World Science Festival BLOG - May 2011  

"A New Piece to the Dark Matter Puzzle,"
by: Katherine Freese - May 6, 2011
For twenty five years I’ve been working on the “dark matter problem”—the question of what makes up roughly 90% of the mass of our Milky Way galaxy as well as every other galaxy. This past week saw intriguing new experimental results that may be telling us something profound about this question.

 

Katherine Freese Photo New Scientist Magazine - July 2010  

"Heart of Darkness Could Explain Sun Mysteries,"
by: Eugenie Samuel Reich - July 17, 2010
Is dark matter lurking at the centre of our bright sun? Yes, say two research groups who believe the elusive stuff is cooling the solar core.

 

 

 

Katherine Freese Photo Sky & Telescope Magazine - March 2010

 

"Shedding LIGHT on DARK STARS,"
page 26, by: Ker Than - March, 2010

Bizarre stars powered by dark matter may have been the first to form after the Big Bang.

(Click here to download the publication as an Adobe PDF file)





Katherine Freese Photo Scientific American March 2010  

"Dark Side of Black Holes: Dark Matter Could Explain the Early Universe's Giant Black Holes,"
by: Charles Q. Choi - March, 2010

Massive black holes should not have existed in a universe less than one billion years old, yet they did.

(Click here to download the publication as an Adobe PDF file)

 

Katherine Freese Discovery News February 13, 2010  

"Did 'Dark Stars' Spawn Supermassive Black Holes?"
by: Ian O'Neill - February 13, 2010

Although it’s believed the first stars (known as “Population III stars”) were sparked when hydrogen and helium gases cooled enough to clump together, collapsing under gravity and initiating nuclear fusion in the star cores (thus generating heavier elements), there’s another possibility.

Katherine Freese Photo Science & Vie Mars 2010  

"Etoiles noires: Elles seraient les premiers astres,"
page 92, par: Mathieu Grousson - Mars, 2010

Faute de pouvoir être observées directement, les étoiles primitives demeurent une énigme pour les scientifiques. Aussi, le scenario de leur formation repose-t-il sur celui des étoiles connues, où la mystérieuse matière noire tient un faible role. Or, voilà qu’une astrophysicienne américaine émet une hypothèse audacieuse: la matière noire serait au coeur même de l’extraordinaire rayonnement de ces premiers astres titanesques.

(Click here to download the publication as an Adobe PDF file)

Katherine Freese Space.com December 21, 2009  

Mystery Swirls Around 'Dark Stars'
by: Charles Q. Choi - December 21, 2009

These "dark stars," first born nearly 13 billion years ago, might still exist today. Although they would not shed any visible light, astronomers might detect these invisible giants ? some 400 to 200,000 times wider than our sun and 500 to 1,000 times more massive ? because they should spew gamma rays, neutrinos and antimatter and be linked with clouds of cold, molecular hydrogen gas that normally would not harbor such energetic particles.

Katherine Freese Photo New Scientist Magazine December 19, 2008  

"Burrowing Black Holes Devoured First Stars From Within,"
by: David Shiga - December 19, 2008
Some physicists speculate that minuscule black holes may have been forged in the very dense soup of matter and radiation that prevailed in the first moments of the universe's existence. If so, these might account for at least some of the invisible dark matter that pervades the universe.


 

Katherine Freese Photo BBC News      

"First stars 'may have been dark,"
by: Roland Pease, BBC Radio Science Unit - February 19, 2008

According to US scientists, the first stars to appear in the Universe may have been powered by dark matter.

Katherine Freese Photo Science News  

"Twinkle, Twinkle: Dark Matter may have lit up first stars,"
page 4, by: Sarah C. Williams - January 5, 2008

The earliest stars in the universe might have been beasts of a different nature than modern stars, a new model suggests. While nuclear reactions between ordinary chemical elements fuel the fire of stars like Earth's own sun, mysterious dark matter might have powered the first stars.

 

 

Katherine Freese Photo PhysOrg  

"First stars might have been powered by dark matter,"
by: Maranda Marquit - February 12, 2008

For a long time, scientists have assumed that the very first stars were powered by fusion, in processes similar to what goes on in present day stars. But a new theory is emerging to challenge that view.

Katherine Freese Photo Slashdot  

"Theory Posits Early Stars Powered By Dark Matter,"
- February 19, 2008

A BBC article highlights a theory that the first stars may have been powered by dark matter.

Katherine Freese Photo New Scientist   "Universe's first stars may have been dark,"
by: Maggie McKee - December 3, 2007

Theorists believe the first stars formed in cradles of dark matter, condensing from clouds of gas until their cores became so dense that nuclear fusion ignited.
Katherine Freese Photo Science News August 2006  

"Enlightened: dark matter spotted after cosmic crash,"
by: Eric Jaffe - August 26, 2006

An intergalactic collision is providing astronomers with a giant payoff: the first direct evidence of the invisible material that theorists say holds galaxies together and accounts for most of the universe's mass. For some 70 years, cosmologists have agreed that theories of gravity account for observations in Earth's solar system but fail on a larger scale. For example, if those theories held throughout the universe, objects on the outskirts of the Milky Way would rotate more slowly than those toward the center. But they don't.

 

Other Press Coverage:

  1. New Scientist, March 2005, "Thirteen Things that do not make sense," article written by Michael Brooks
  2. New Scientist, February 2005, "The Future of the Universe," article written by Stephen Battersby
  3. BBC program on National Public Radio, March 2004, "Dark Matter," (http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/programmes/sci act.shtml), interview with Roland Pease
  4. BBC online, March 2004, "Earth on the 'Wimp Highway'," http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3573041.stm, article written by Roland Pease
  5. New York Times, February 2000, "In the Dark Matter Wars, WIMPs beat MACHOs," article written by James Glanz, cover of Science Times including photograph
  6. Dallas Morning News, February 2004, "If Seeking Dark Matter, Beware Spherical Cows," article written by Tom Siegfried
  7. Nature, News and Views, May 2004, "Life Can go on Forever," article written by Phillip Ball
  8. New York Times, November 2003, "What is Gravity, Really? (25 top Scientific Questions for the Coming Decade)," article by Dennis Overbye
  9. New Scientist, August 2002, "Will Life Last Forever?," Cover article for the August edition, written by Phillip Ball
  10. Dallas News, January 2002, "Cardassian Math adds Dimension to the Universe," article written by Tom Siegfried
  11. New York Times, February 2002,"Germans’ Claim on Dark Matter is Greeted with Skepticism," article written by James Glanz
  12. New Scientist, July 2002, "Stargazer takes on Grand Theory," article written by Eugenie Samuel
  13. Boston Globe, March 2001, "Dark Matter," article written by Gareth Cooke
  14. New York Times, Feb. 2000, "Experiments at Stanford Shake Dark Matter Claim," article written by James Glanz
  15. The Associated Press, March 2000, "Scientists Begin to Shed Light on Dark Matter," article written by Matthew Fordahl
  16. Space.com, April 2000, "Feeling Around for Dark Matter"
  17. Yahoo News, April 2000, "Shedding Light on Dark Matter"
  18. Scientific American, May 2000, "What’s the Matter?, " article written by George Musser
  19. Cosmiverse.com, April 2000, "Lighting up Dark Matter"
  20. Dallas Morning News, July 5, 1999, "Stretching your Brane: Hidden Space Dimensions may permit Parallel Universes, Explain Cosmic Mysteries," article written by Tom Siegfried
  21. Dallas Morning News, February 22, 1999, "Mirror, mirror out in space may solve MACHO mystery," article written by Tom Siegfried
  22. Scientific American, 1999, article on “Dark Matter"