Exhibits

"Sanakawa Ichimatsu III in the Role of Hakujin Onoyo," c. 1794, Toshusai Sharaku, Woodblock Print

A dynamic extension of the art experiences offered by the Telfair are special exhibitions from the collection and exciting traveling shows from all over the world. The Museum also offers a variety of stimulating programs for all ages, including hands-on youth activities in the Education Gallery, Evening Lectures, guided tours and Family Sundays.



Current Exhibitions Upcoming Exhibitions


Current

CONTINUING THROUGH FEBRUARY 18, 2001
LADIES, LANDSCAPES, AND LOYAL RETAINERS: JAPANESE ART FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

"Nakamura Nishio in a Scene from the Dojoji", late 18th-19th century, Utagawa Toyokuni I, Woodblock PrintEvoking the rich cultural ambiance of Edo period Japan (1615-1868), this memorable exhibition features classic ukiyo-e prints depicting scenes from the "Floating World." These striking works explore the majesty and intricacy of nature, the excitement of kabuki theatre, and the fleeting delights of the pleasure districts, populated by elegant geisha.

Accompanying the prints are exquisitely crafted cabinet objects including sword fittings, articles of personal adornment, sake cups, and two painted screens. The traditional ukiyo-e themes of beautiful ladies, actors, landscapes, and nature are prevalent throughout.

Part of a private collection assembled in Kyoto during the American occupation, the show includes objects that have never before been publicly displayed. Ladies, Landscapes, and Loyal Retainers will close February 18th.



CONTINUING THROUGH FEBRUARY 18, 2001
KAHLIL GIBRAN: ARTIST AND VISIONARY
Organized by the Telfair Museum of Art

"Untitled (Sappho)" Kahlil Gibran, n.d. A treasured and unique part of the Telfair’s permanent collection, Kahlil Gibran’s evocative artwork is on display in the Drawing Room through February 18th. Best known as the author of The Prophet, Gibran was born in Lebanon. He immigrated with his family to Boston in 1895 when he was 12 years old. There he met the woman who would ultimately become his great patron and lifelong friend, Mary Haskell. After she moved to Savannah, Haskell (who married Savannah resident Jacob Florance Minis) donated over 80 of Gibran’s works to the Telfair, giving the museum the largest public holding of his visual art in North America.

This exhibition presents an excellent opportunity to view works that are not always on display, since many of Gibran’s works on paper are extremely light-sensitive. Rendered in oils, watercolors, pencil, and pastels, Gibran’s art evokes a world that is ethereal, delicate, and dreamlike; it is, in short, the world of the spirit that inspired both his art and his literature.

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LONG TERM LOAN
Acacia Collection of African Americana

Items from the Acacia Collection on view at the Owens-Thomas House Items from the Acacia Collection on view at the Owens-Thomas House
Selected items on view at the Owens-Thomas House Urban Slave Quarters. Organized by theAcacia Collection and the Telfair Museum of Art.

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Upcoming


"The Garden Parasol," by 1910, North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh

FREDERICK CARL FRIESEKE: THE EVOLUTION OF AN AMERICAN IMPRESSIONIST
March 20 through June 3, 2001

Photograph of the artist in his youth A millennium milestone will be celebrated on March 20th when Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist, the largest and most comprehensive traveling exhibition ever to be organized by the Telfair Museum of Art, opens in Savannah.Almost four years in the making, the retrospective contains more than 80 works and will travel to three other venues: the San Diego Museum of Art, the Terra Museum of American Art in Chicago, and The Dixon Gallery and Gardens in Memphis. Some of the works, deemed too fragile to travel, are exclusive to the Telfair.

Accompanying the exhibition will be a handsome 220-page full-color hardback catalogue published by the Telfair and distributed jointly with Princeton University Press. In addition, a 30-minute documentary with footage filmed in France, plus a charming children’s book illustrated by Savannah’s own Harriet Delong, and numerous special events complement the retrospective.

"The Yellow Room," by 1913, Museum of Fine Arts, BostonRecognized during his time as America’s best known painter internationally, Frieseke is considered one of our country’s finest Impressionists. In this retrospective, the full breadth of his genius will be revealed through examination of the three phases of his artistic evolution--from his early period, to his fully developed Impressionist stage, to his later more realistic work.

Frieseke’s early phase--from his arrival in Paris in 1897 until his move to Giverny in 1905--was influenced by the academic style favored in the Paris salons and the tonal approach of his famous teacher James McNeill Whistler. The Yellow Room (above) bears witness to this influence in its tonal arrangements and Japanese accessories.

"Lady in a Garden," c. 1912, Terra Foundation for the ArtsThe second phase of Frieseke’s evolution--1905 to 1920--began after he settled in Giverny, where he adopted a looser brushstroke and lighter palette, working in the characteristic Impressionist style for which he is best known. He became a dominant force in the Giverny Group, a circle of expatriate American painters who lived and worked in this picturesque French village and celebrated artists’ colony during the early 1900s, establishing as its primary theme the female figure in sunlit gardens or intimate boudoirs. The exhibition will focus on many works from Frieseke’s Giverny years, including Lady in a Garden and The Garden Parasol (both pictured above).

Although Frieseke has often been described as "a painter of pretty women," his principal concerns were actually sunlight and its varied effects. "Portrait of a Woman (with cactus)," 1930, Private CollectionIn his own words, "It is sunshine, flowers in sunshine; girls in sunshine; the nude in sunshine, which I have been principally interested in...If I could only reproduce it exactly as I see it I would be satisfied."

In 1920 Frieseke moved his family to Normandy where he entered the final stage of his painting career. Returning to his early tonalist style, he adopted a more realistic approach while retaining his enduring interest in reflected light on the female form.

The exhibition, catalogue, and documentary film have been made possible by generous support from The Henry Luce Foundation. Partial underwriting for the documentary film has also been provided by the Richard and Jane Manoogian Foundation.




JUNE 26 - AUGUST 26, 2001
AFTER HISTORY: THE PAINTINGS OF DAVID BIERK
Organized by the Montgomery Museum of Art

JUNE 26 - AUGUST 26, 2001
THE MAGICAL SELF: AFRICAN-AMERICAN HAIRDOS OF SAVANNAH
Organized by the Telfair Museum of Art (traveling)

SEPTEMBER 15, 2001 - JANUARY 2002
ANDREW WYETH: CLOSE FRIENDS
Organized by the Mississippi Museum of Art
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