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TNA C 24/174:  Governors of the Free School of St. Saviour Southwark
The interrogatories and depositions presented here are a memorial of observations recorded for future reference rather than documents in a particular lawsuit.  The transcription is in modern spelling except for surnames and the forename of Naverine or Averine Wood.  The two sets of interrogatories or questions are on parchment, while the depositions or responses are on paper.  The eleventh question of the first set of interrogatories is on the back or dorse of its membrane, indicated by the word "verte" meaning "turn over".




Deponents:
Eight deponents responding to First Interrogatory (11 questions):
Edward Walsh of London, gent'
Richard Ballard of St. Saviour, Southwark, hosier
Elizabeth Roberts, wife of John, of St. Olave, Southwark, sawyer
Prudence Scales, wife of John, of St. Mary Overies, Southwark, carver
Thomas Dwye (Dwxye) of St. Saviour, Southwark, butcher
John Carea of St. Katherine's near the Tower of London, baker
Robert Pyndar of St. Mary Overies, Southwark, grocer
William Cox of St. Mary Overies, Southwark, yeoman
Two deponents responding to Second Interrogatory (4 questions)
John Ware gent' yeoman for the mouth [i.e., taster] to the Queen, of her vintry
Robert Deawar of St. Olave, Southwark, joiner


  [FIRST SET OF INTERROGATORIES (11 questions)]  

Gubernatores libere Schole Sancti Salvatoris Southwark in perpetuam rei memoriam
[Governors of the Free School of St. Saviour, Southwark, to be remembered forever.]

Interrogatories to be ministered on the behalf of Thomas Cure, Thomas House, Brian Patenson, John Trene, Christopher Campbell, and Richard Clerk, Governors of the Free Grammar School of the parish of St Saviour in Southwark in perpetual memory.

Imprimis  do you know an alley in Long Southwark called Chequer Alley, and how long have you known the same to your knowledge.

2/  Item do you know in the said alley a house called the Cross House, and in what part of the alley doth it stand to your knowledge.

3/  Item did you ever know one Robert Clowsse glover dwelling in the said alley, and in what house dwelt he in there, and how long is it since.

4/  Item did you ever know one William Hore alias Oxford a minstrel dwelling in the said Chequer Alley, and in what house did he dwell in there.

5/  Item did you ever know one John Dericke dwelling in the said alley, and in what house dwelt he in there, and how long since.

6/  Item did you ever know the kitchen of the said Cross House to be let out for a tenement alone from the said Cross House either in Clowze's time, Hore's time, or Derick's time and whether the saide kitchen was parcel, and belonging to the said Cross House or not, and what way they went in to the said kitchen.

7/  Item do you know in what parish the said Cross House and kitchen stand and to what parish they pay tithes for the same./

8/  Item did you ever know the churchwardens of St Olave's come into the said Cross House in the Sabbath day to peruse and see if any were there playing or drinking in the time of divine service, take any (dis)tress there for such a fault.

9/  Item did you ever know the parishioners of St Olave parish come unto the said Cross House upon the perambulation day as parcel and bound [=boundary] of the said parish.

10/  Item did you know how many tenements was on of the north side of Chequer Alley from the well to the Cross House before they were pulled down, and what tenants dwelt in the same and what was their names to your knowledge.

11/  Did you ever know that they that dwelled in the said Cross House have paid any tithe for the same to the parish of St Olave's.

  [SECOND SET OF INTERROGATORIES (4 questions)]  

Imprimis  did you ever know one alley in Southwark called Chequer Alley, and how long have you knownthe same to your knowledge

Item  do you know in the same alley a house commonly called the Cross Howse, and what place of the same alley doth it stand in to your knowledge.

Item  did you ever know one William Hore alias Oxforde a minstrel dwelling in the same Chequer Alley and in what house did he dwell in there, and whether it was on the south side being on the right hand of the same alley, or on the north side on the left hand; and what going-in to the same house had he within the said alley, and how near the Cross House was his door into the same Chequer Alley and what parish stood that house in.

Item  do you know in what parish the Cross House now in controversy standeth in

  DEPOSITIONS  

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Ex parte gubernatorum libere Scole Sancti Salvatoris Southwark versus Magistros Hospitalis Sancti Thome ibidem, in perpetuam rei memoriam Testes examinati per Henricam Jhones in Cancellaria Examinatorem

Edward Walsh of London gent' of the age of 65 years or thereabouts sworn and examined the fifth day of December in the 27th year [of Elizabeth] etc.

To the first interrogatory: that he doth know the alley in Long Southwark called by the name of Chequer Alley, and hath known the same by the space of these 40 years and upwards.

To the second: that he doth very well know the house standing in the said alley called by an old name the Cross House, and saith that the said house standeth at furthest end of the said alley east.

To the third: that as far as he can remember there dwelled many years past in the said alley one Robert Clowsse or one of the like name, and as he remembereth he was a glover and dwelled in the said house called the Cross House, and saith that since the said Robert Clowsse dwelled in the same, he thinketh it is about 40 years past.

To the fourth: that he doth very well remember there dwelled sometime in the said Chequer Alley one William Hore alias Oxford a minstrel or musician in the house commonly called the Side House next to the Cross House on the south side and had his going in into the said house as the door is now and saith that it is about 28 years past since he dwelled there.

To the fifth: that he doth not remember William Derick when he dwelled in the said alley, nor more can say to this interrogatory.

To the sixth: that he never knew that the kitchen of the said house called the Cross House was at any time let out for a tenement alone, but always for the time of his remembrance belonged and went with the said Cross House, and the ordinary and usual way into the said kitchen was used always into the same through the said Cross House.

To the seventh: that the said house called the Cross House and the said kitchen thereunto belonging did as he hath been informed, and as the common report went, stand both within the parish of St Olave in Southwark, and paid the tithes due for the same to the parson or parish of St Olave aforesaid, and yet doth for anything he knoweth.

To the eighth: that he never knew or heard during the time that he did know the said alley and Cross House, that the churchwardens

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of St Olave's parish did at any time come into the said alley into the said Cross House upon the Sabbath day, or upon any other holy day, to search and see if any persons were either playing or drinking in the same, or in any part thereof, in the time of divine service, either in the forenoon or afternoon.

To the ninth: that he did never know or understand that the parishioners of St Olave's aforesaid did come to the said Cross House upon the days of their peramulation in the Gang Week or Rogation Week, as that the said Cross House with the appurtenances should stand within the compass, limits, and bounds of the same parish, nor that any that dwelled in the same Cross House, have gone with the procession and perambulation of the same parish as part and parcel of the same parish.

To the 10th: that for anything that he remembereth, there were but three tenements on the north side of Chequer Alley from the well to the said Cross House, before they were pulled down, but what tenants besides the said William Hore alias Oxford dwelled in them he saith he remembereth not.  And saith that when the said William Hore alias Oxford dwelled there in the house next to the said Cross House on the south side, as is beforesaid, the same house stood by common report within the bounds of [+the] parish of St Mary Overies, and after he had dwelled there a time, he bought a lease which one Gibbes had of the same Cross House, and of the other tenements in the alley there, by the grant of the master of St Thomas Hospital in those days, and then did he the same William Hore use the said tenement and the said Cross House all in one dwelling house, and shut up the old door by the which he had his ordinary way out of the said alley into the said tenement, and went through the Cross House into the same, by making a new door out of the said Cross House into the said Side House or tenement.  And albeit the chief part of the premises, that is to say where the said William Hore alias Oxford and his wife did lie, eat, and drink in, was in the said tenement or Side House, and withall had the occupation use and easement of the said Cross House, the tenement standing in the parish of St Mary Overies, and the Cross House in the parish of St Olave; yet did the said William Hore use St Mary Overies Church for his parish church duly and accustomably,

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and not the parish church of St Olave, though indeed he paid his tithe for the Cross House to the parson or parish of St Olave, and all other duties for the same, and his tithes for the said tenement or Side House to the parson or parish of St Mary Ovaries.  This he saith he knoweth to be true for after the death of the said William Hore alias Oxford, he this deponent married his widow, and in her right as executrix to her husband, he had and held the said houses in manner and form aforesaid so long as he dwelled thereupon, before he sold the same.  And this is as much as he can say in effect in this matter.
(signed) Edward Welsh

Richard Ballarde of the parish of St Saviour in Southwark near London hosier of the age of 67 years or thereabouts, sworn and examined the 19th day of April in the year of Her Majesty's reign aforesaid and in the year of our Lord God 1585 etc.

To the first interrogatory: that he hath he hath [sic] known the alley in Long Southwark called Chequer Alley by the space of these 50 years and upwards.

To the second: that he doth know the house called by an old name the Cross House in the said alley standing at the east end thereof.

To the third: that he doth well remember when one Robert Clowes dwelled in one part of the said Cross House, at the south end thereof near upon 40 years past, and in a chamber thereof wrought and made gloves, a man of a short stature.

To the fourth: that he did very well know William Hore alias Oxford a minstrel dwelling in the said alley, and dwelt in the said house called the Cross House, and kept a dancing school in the parlor below of the same.

To the fifth: that he doth well remember that one John Derick did afterwards dwell in the said Cross House, and kept victualling in the same, and since he dwelled there, he thinketh it is about 30 years.

To the sixth: that he cannot certainly depose whether the kitchen of the said Cross House was at any time let out for a tenement alone from the same Cross House.  But he doth know that the said kitchen was a part and parcel of the said Cross House, and the way to the same was through the said Cross House.

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To the seventh: that for anything that he hath known or heard the said Cross House standeth in St Olave's parish, and the house where in the said William Hore dwelled and kept his dancing school in St Saviours parish sometime called Mary Magdalene's parish, and as he doth verily think the said houses pay tithes both to St  Saviour's parish and St  Olave's parish.

To the eightth: that he never knew nor heard that at any time the churchwardens of St Olaves parish did come to the said Cross House upon the Sabbath or holy days to search or see if any were playing at cards or tables, or drinking in the time of divine service, nor ever heard of any (di)stress taken there for any such fault.

To the ninth: that he never knew that the parishioners of St Olave's parish did come at any time in the Gang Week to the said Cross House in their accustomed perambulation and procession, to bound in the same Cross House or any part thereof as part and parcel of that parish.

To the 10th: that he cannot depose.

To the 11th: that he can say no more than he hath before said to the seventh interrogatory, nor more saith in this matter.

(signed) Rychard Ballard

Elizabeth Roberts wife of John Roberts in the parish of St Olave in Southwark sawyer of the age of 40 years and upwards sworn and examined the day and year aforesaid etc.

To the first interrogatory: that she doth very well know Chequer Alley in Long Southwark, for she dwelled in a house call the Cross House there by the space of 26 years or thereabouts, being then servant to one Derick that dwelled in the same.

To the second: that the said Cross House standeth in the further end of the said alley on the left hand going to the same out of the street.  And saith that in the said Cross House were five rooms, with a little room under one Mother Tailor's shop under the stairs going up to her chamber.  The hall standing next the street door, a chamber over the same, the kitchen at the north end of the said Cross House, with a little dark place as it were a cellar under the same, and the little place where the said Mother Tailor set her ale and billets when this deponent dwelled there.

To the third: that she remembereth no such man.

To the fourth: that it is beyond his [for her] remembrance.

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To the fifth: that the said Derick died in the parlor of another house, no parcel of the said Cross House, but yet dwelled in the said Cross House.  And saith that it is since he died about 21 years.

To the sixth: that she never knew the kitchen of the said Cross House to be let out for a tenement alone from the said Cross House, but that always during her remembrance belonged to the said Cross House, and the way that went into the same was through the hall at a door in the north end of the said hall, and no other way at that time.  And saith that the said Derick had both the said Cross House, the great parlor, with other rooms above the same, for his own use, and saith that she remembereth the said Derick did once let out the said rooms or some of them to a brewer for three or four years together, and afterwards took them into his own hands again.

To the seventh: that both the said Cross House and the said kitchen do stand within the parish of St Olave's, and the tithes for the same is paid to the said parish and parson.  And saith that the said Derick and his wife and household went to the church of St Olave's as to their parish church, and saith that she can go to the pews in St Olaves church at this day where the said Derick and his wife sat.

To the eighth: that in her [sic] Mr.  Derick's time, she hath seen the churchwardens or sidemen of St Olave's parish come into the said alley, upon some Sabboth or holy days to see if any were drinking or playing in Dyreck's house there being a victualling house, in the time of divine service, and hath seen them once take a distress out of the said Dirick's house for such a fault.

To the ninth: that she hath seen diverse of the parishioners of St Olave's parish aforesaid in the Rogation Week in their perambulation come into the said Cross [+House] and into the kitchen, as into the uttermost bound of their parish, and so have drunk there.

To the tenth: that she cannot now certainly remember how many tenements and stood on the north side of the said alley from the well to the said Cross House before they were pulled down, but as she thinketh there were but four, and what their names were that dwelled therein she hath forgotten, saving the[?] Goody Tailor.

To the eleventh: that she doth well remember that the parson of St Olave's man hath come to the Derick while she dwelled with him for his tithe due out of the said Cross House, and he hath paid it unto him oftentimes, but how much she knoweth not.  And this is as much as she saith she can say to the said interrogatory.

(signed) [Elizabeth Roberts' mark]

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Prudence Scales wife of John Scales of the parish of St Mary Overies in Southwark carver of the age of 40 years and upwards sworn and examined the day and year abovesaid etc.

To the first interrogatory: that she hath known the alley called the Chequer Alley in Long Southwark about these 19 years.

To the second: that she doth very well know the house in the said alley called by old the Cross House, and it standeth therein at the further end thereof east as she taketh it.

The third, fourth, and fifth: that she never knew any of the persons named in these interrogatories dwellers in the said alley, but she hath heard they did dwell therein sometime; but it was before this deponent knew it.

To the sixth: that she doth well remember the kitchen that doth belong to the said Cross House was let out by itself as a tenement or a dwelling house when she came to dwell in the said Cross House, and one Gowstree dwelled in it, a baker, and after him one Ashmore another baker; but whether it went so before this deponent came thither she knoweth not, but she did hear say when she came to dwell in the said Cross House, that the said kitchen did belong to the same Cross House, which she doth persuade herself was true, but the only way that went of old into the same kitchen was through the hall of the Cross House, and after it was let out from the said Cross House, as a dwelling house by itself, the old door was shut up, and a new door made out of the same into the alley to go into it.

To the seventh: that the said Cross House and the said kitchen stand in the parish of St Olave in Southwark, and payeth tithe to the parson there, and her husband that then was called John Leigh paid it in his time.  And saith that they held the long parlor also, and paid tithe for that to the parson of St Saviour's, because it stood in that parish, but how much tithe her husband paid for them severally to either of the said parsons, she saith she knoweth not.

To the eighth: that she doth well remember when she dwelled in the said Cross House, some of the churchwardens or sidemen of the parish of St Olave have come into the same upon the Sabbath and holy days to see if any were drinking or playing there in service time, for the better keeping of good order in those days, but she never saw them to her remembrance take any distress for such faults.

To the ninth: that she doth well remember diverse of the said parish

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of St Olave both old and young have upon the perambulation days in the Rogation Week come into the said Cross House when this deponent dwelled in it, as to the utmost bounder of the same parish, and have drunk there.

To the 10th: that when this deponent came to dwell in the said Cross House and long after, there stood on the north side of the said alley between the well there and the said Cross House, before they were pulled down, three houses, and there dwelled in the same one Horseley, one Poultar, and one Mother Tailor, and after her some called Freeman, whose house adjoined to the Cross House in all eastward next the well.  And saith that the governors of the free grammar school in St Saviour's parish took down the frame of the said three tenements, because it was like to fall for age and weakness, and the said kitchen also, and builded the same new again, for three tenements.  But the Cross House, though it was old also, and taken for the fourth tenement, they did not pull down because the workmen told them it was strong enough for many years yet to come.

To the 11th: that she can say no more than she hath before said to the seventh interrogatory, nor further can say in this matter.

(signed) [Prudence Scales' mark]

Thomas Dwye of the parish of St Saviour's in Southwark butcher, of the age of 46 years or thereabouts, sworn and examined the 20th day of April in the year aforesaid etc.

To the first interrogatory: that he hath known the alley in Long Southwark called Chequer Alley these 20 years or thereabouts, and dwelled in it about 10 years in the house adjoining to the Cross House there on the left side thereof.

To the second: that he has known the said house called the Cross House as long, and saieth that the same Cross House standeth on the left hand of the said alley east, going out of the street at the end thereof.

To the third, fourth, and fifth interrogatory: this deponent saith he cannot depose.

To the sixth: that he did very well know the kitchen of the said Cross House, for it stood at the north end thereof.  And did always by common report belong to the same.  And says he hath known the said Cross House the said kitchen was never let out from the said Cross House for a tenement alone, neither doth he think it could, for there was no way unto the same, neither out of it, but only through the hall of the Cross House, and so through the Cross House door into the alley.

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To the seventh: that the said Cross House and kitchen were by the space of two years or thereabouts in this deponent's occupation.  And saith that the same Cross House and kitchen do stand within the parish of St Olave, and doth paye tithe to the parson there.  And during the time he dwelled in the same, he went to St Olave's church as to this parish church, and did both christen and bury there.

To the eighth: that the churchwardens and sidemen of the parish of St Olave's aforesaid or some of them did commonly use to come into the said alley and into the said Cross House, both when this deponent dwelled in it, and specially before upon the Sabbath and holy days to see if any were drinking or playing there in the time of service; and saieth that he hath seen in one Turner's time when he dwelled in the said Cross House and victualled in it, some of quart pots taken as a distress for such faults.

To the ninth: that he doth well remember that diverse of the parishioners of St Olave's both young and old, did yearly use to come into the said Cross House upon one of the perambulation days in the Rogation Week as to the utmost bounder and part of the same parish, and drink therein.

To the 10th: that he cannot depose.

To the 11th: that he doth know he that they who dwelled in the said Cross House before him, as one Leigh, one Wynter, one Westmerland, the said Turner, and Parsons, did pay their tithe for the said house to the parson of the church of St Olave's yearly, and so did this deponent after them, so long as he dwelled in it.  And more he saith he cannot say to these interrogatories.

(signed) By me Thomas Dyxse

John Carea of St Catherine's near the Tower of London baker of the age of 48 years or thereabouts, sworn and examined the day and year last beforesaid etc.

To the first interrogatory: that he hath known the alley in Long Southwark called Chequer Alley by the space of these 30 years or thereabouts.

To the second: that there is in the said alley called Chequer Alley a house called many years the Cross House, and it standeth at the east end of the said alley on the left side going out of the street, and saieth that next after one Derykes death who dwelled in the same and left it to his wife, who married one Smith, and this deponent took it of the said Smith, and the rooms which he had thereof

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were the said Cross House, the kitchen (be)longing to the same, and the little dark cellar under the same, and sold bear and ale and victual in the same and did pay for the same yearly 12d by the Week.

To the 3rd: that he cannot depose.

To the fourth: that he doth remember ther dwelt sometime in a part of the said Cross House a minstrel, but what his name was he hath forgotten.

To the fifth: that he never knew John Derik, for he was dead before this deponent came to the said alley to dwell.  But he doth know he dwelled in the said Cross House, and kept victualling in it, for the said Smith having married Derik's wife, and had buried her, had the interest of the said Cross House in the right of his wife, and minding to go into Ireland, did let out the same to this deponent.

To the sixth: that he never knew the kitchen appurtaining to the said Cross House to be at any time let out alone from the Cross House, but always was used with the same Cross House, for as he was credibly informed, the said Derick's wife used to bake her cakes in the oven thereof all her time.  And saith that the same kitchen did then stand at the north end of the hall of the said Cross House.  And had no other way into the same but only through the hall of the said Cross House, and saith that the said Cross House had no mo than four rooms, that is to say, the hall where the hearth stood, the loft over that, the said kitchen, and the little dark cellar under the same.

To the seventh: that the said Cross House and kitchen do stand within the parish of St Olave in Southwark.  And so long as he dwelt in it the tithe for the same was paid by the foresaid Smith to the parson of St Olave.  And so long as he this deponent dwelled and occupied in the said Cross House and kitchen he used St Olave's church for his parish church.  And the cause why this deponent was discharged of the payment of all tithes was because he paid to the said Smith 3s by the Week rent for all together, that is to say, for the house of the Cross House and the chamber (be)longing to the same, 12d a Week, for the said kitchen and the said little dark cellar 12d a Week, and for a parlor and a little cellar that stood on the one side of the same which had a door going into the same parlor, 12d by the Week, the which parlor and cellar to the same stood in the parish of St Mary Overies, and paid all duties for the same to the parson there.

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To the eighth: that whiles this deponent dwelled and occupied in the said Cross House and kept victualling in it, and in the said parlor also, some of the churchwardens and sidemen of the parish of St Olave would come to the said Cross House upon the Sabbath and holy days to see if any were drinking or playing therein in the service time.  And once he well remembereth they found some drinking in the Cross House upon a Sunday as he calleth to mind, in the service time, and took from this deponent for a distress for the same a pewter platter, the which he could have again without 12d to the poor men's box, and promise that afterwards he would see no more done thereof upon the Sabbath day.  And saith that the churchwarden that took away the said platter dwelled over against St Olave's church by the Walnut Tree.

To the ninth: that he doth well remember that in the Gang Week when parishes go about in the perambulation of the bounds of their parishes, both old and young of St Olave's parish used to come to the said Cross House as to the uttermost part of St Olave's parish and drunk therein; in this deponent's time he dwelled in the same.

To the 10th: that he cannot certainly depose.

To the 11th: that as he hath before said the said Cross House and kitchen did pay their tithe to the parson of St Olave, and when the parson or his man or deputy sent to this deponent for the same, he sent them to the said Smith, and he paid it.  And this is all to his remembrance that he can say in this matter.

(signed) [John Carea's mark]

Robert Pyndar of St Mary Overies parish in Southwark grocer of the age of 60 years or thereabouts sworn and examined the 11th day of December in the 28 year &c.

To the first interrogatory: that he hath known the alley called Cross House in Long Southwark by the space of these 16 years or thereabouts.

To the second: that he doth know the house called the Cross House standing in the said alley, and it is called by that name because it crosseth the same alley at the east end thereof.

To the third: that he never knew Robert Clowse named in this Interrogatory, nor in what house he dwelled in in the said alley, but he saith that about 2 years past he this deponent and one Richard Hutton being chosen arbitrators for and on the behalf of the Masters or Governors of the Free School in Southwark in St Saviour's parish in matter of question concerning the said house called the Cross House between them, and the Masters of St Thomas Hospital

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in the said Borough, on whose behalf were chosen also arbitrators one Mr.  Billingsley, one Mr.  Awnslow to the end that the truth of the matter between the said parties known by such ancient people and tenants as did and had dwelled in the same alley, and knew the same, the controversy between the same might the better be decided, among whom specially were examined one Naverine Wood a [very] old woman of the age of 74 years, that very well knew the said alley and the dwellers therein for the space of 60 years or thereabouts, as she affirmed lying on her death bed, who said that she knew Robert Clowes named in this Interrogatory very well, and that he was a glover, a little short man and somewhat limped on his right leg, and dwelled in the foresaid house called the Cross House in the said alley, fifty years past.

To the fourth: that the said Naverine Wood said also that she knew William Hore alias Oxford named in this interrogatory.  And that he was a musician or a minstrel and kept a dancing school at the south end of the said Cross House about the same time, and that the door of the said William Hore's house was at [+the] upper end of the alley on the right hand as they come in into the said alley behind, whereas [i.e.  where] a stairs hath been since that time made in the said alley.  And that after Clowes went out of the said Cross House the said William Hore took it into the house wherein he dwelled at the south end thereof, and so made but one house of both those houses.

To the fifth and sixth: that the said Averyne Wood affirmed also that she did very well know one John Derick that dwelled afterwards in the same house called the Cross House, and kept victualling in the same.  And said that there (be)longed to the same house in those days four rooms and one small room under one Mother Tailor's stairs, out of her shop adjoining to Derick's kitchen where Derik's wife laid her drink.  And said that the said four rooms were the hall of the Cross House, the loft or solar over the same, the kitchen at the north end of the said hall, and a small dark cellar under the same.  And that the way into the said kitchen was at the north end of the same hall by the table and within the same hall and no way else.  And further did say that the said Cross House stood within the parish of St Olave in Southwark for anything she ever heard or knew.  And thought in her consicnece it was of St Olave's parish for that she well remembered that the said Derike, his wife and family went to service to St Olave's church as their parish church, but how long certain the said Derick dwelled in the same Cross House and had the use and occupation of all the said rooms she could not certainly remember, but as she could reckon she thought it was about 23 years paSt And further the said Averyne Wood said and affirmed that she never knew the said kitchen of the said Cross House to be letten out for a tenement alone from the said Cross House in Derick's time, but that the said Derick did occupy the same himself with the said Cross House, and as parcel of the same Cross House, because there was no way into the said kitchen that ever she knew, but only through the hall of the said Cross House.

To the seventh: that the said Naverine Wood said also that for anything

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that she did ever know or hear, the tenants and dwellers in the said Cross House did pay their tithes and church duries to the church of St Olave's aforesaid and that they did use always as there was cause both to christen and to bury in the said St Olave's church or churchyard.

[sideways in left margin:] And further said and affirmed that she had seen the parson of St Olave's or his deputy come to the said Cross House for his tithe.

To the eighth and ninth: that the said Naveryne Wood did also say and affirm of her own certain knowledge (as she said) the churchwardens and sidemen of St Olave's church and parish or some of them have come upon Sundays and other special holy days into the said Cross House in Derick's time while he kept victualling, and since also to see who were drinking in the same, in the time of service, and if they found any drinking there then, they would take a distress out of the house for such a fault.  And further the said old woman said that she did know and did well remember, that in the Rogation Week, the curate or clerk of St Olave's church, and diverse of the parish of the same did use to come and go into the said house called the Cross House as to the uttermost bound of the said parish to the street side south, and eaten cakes and drink there.

To the 10th: that the said old woman affirmed also that one Leigh dwelt in the said Cross House at the time of the pulling down of the three tenements there, on the north side of the said alley from the well to the same Cross House, but who were the tenants of the said three tenements, she said she did not then certainly remember.  And this deponent saith by the oath that he hath taken, was the saying and tale of the said old woman when she was examined without oath given her in this matter.

And further this deponent saith that at or about the same time that this controversy between the said Governors and Masters of the said school and hospital was in arbitrament, there was also one Harry Grene examined of the same matter.  And he affirmed all that the said old woman had declared to be true in every point and article, being born about two houses of the said alley.  Adding thereunto that since the foresaid Robert Clowes dwelled in the said Cross House it was then about 35 or 36 years, and that the foresaid Derik's wife when her husband and she dwelled in the said Cross House, she used to bake cakes in the said kitchen.  And this he saith was about 26 years then paSt Adding further that he knew Mr.  Eston's man, whose master had the parsonage of St Olave's in farm, receive tithes of them that dwelt in the said Cross House, but how much he knew not.  And that at that time there was a door out of the backside of the said Cross House into the churchyard or burying place of St Olave's, and had been long before he did know the same.  Adding also that he never knew but three tenements standing between the well in the said alley and the said Cross House on the

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north side thereof, and the Cross House to be the fourth tenement with that parish, and that his name that dwelled then next the said well was Thomas Dawson a tailor, and next above him eastward did one John Barlow dwell, and was a porter, and sold drink, and next Barlow still eastward adjoining to the same Cross House, dwelt one Thomas Tailor, a fishhook maker, and in the Cross House John Derik.  And this deponent says that the several examinations so taken of the said old woman and Grene were set down in writing, and subscribed with the hand of the one, and signed with the mark of the other, and do yet remain (though not upon their oaths) at this present extant to be seen.  And this is all that he can say in this matter as he saith.

(signed) Per me Robart Pinder

William Cox of the parish of St Mary Overies in Southwark yeoman of the age of 60 years and upwards, sworn and examined the 22nd day of January in the year last beforesaid etc.

To the first interrogatory: that he doth know and hath known the alley in Long Southwark called Chequer Alley ever since the coming in of Queen Ann of Clieve [i.e., Cleves = c.1540].

To the second: that he doth know there is a house in the said alley commonly called the Cross House.  And saith that the same Cross House standeth just (a)cross at the east end of the said alley, and was always so-called because it standeth so.

To the third: that he doth well remember when William Hore otherwise called William Oxford dwelled in the said alley and he was a minstrel, and kept a dancing school, and dwelled on the south side of the same Cross House, upon the right hand, as they go in into the same alley next adjoining to the same Cross House, and at that time had his door and going in into his house near to the same Cross House without any other door between them, till he took the said Cross House in unto him, to enlarge his own house, and saieth that the said Cross House doth stand within the parish of St Olave there, and so always reputed and taken.  And the house wherein the said Hore first dwelled in there before he took the Cross House, stood within the parish of St Mary Magdalen now called St Saviour's.  And saith that the Cross House never paid any church duty to any other church but to the church and parish of St Olave's, and the other house to the parish and church of St Mary Magdalen, now St Saviour's.  And this is as much as he can say to the said interrogatory ministered unto him.

(signed) William Cox

John Ware gent' yeoman for the mouth to our sovereign lady the Queen's Majesty in her vintry, of the age of 69 years and upwards, sworn and examined the 13th day of April in the 28th year etc.
To the first interrogatory: that he hath known the alley in Long Southwark called Chequer Alley by the space of these 40 years and upwards.

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To the second: that he doth know and well remembereth that there stood in those days and as he thinketh yet standeth at the east end of the said alley a house called the Cross House.

To the third: that he did very well know one William Hore otherwise commonly called William of Oxford, a minstrel, dwelled in the same alley, in a house standing on the right hand on the south side of the same alley parcel of the same Cross House or hard adjoining thereunto, going into the same by two or three steps down the same alley, and (as he thinketh) as it is now at this present, hard at the said Cross House.  And saieth that at that time the said William Hore alias Oxford kept a dancing school there, and saith that the house wherein the said Hore then and in those days dwelled stood then in the parish of St Mary Magdalen now St Mary Overies.

To the fourth: that he cannot certainly depose, but he saith that he thinketh that the said house called the Cross House stood in those days within the parish of St Olave's in Southwark.  And more he saith he cannot depose to these interrogatories.

(signed) John Ware

Robert Deawar of the parish of St Olave's in Southwark beyond London Bridge joiner of the age of 32 years or thereabouts, sworn and examined the 9th day of June and the 28th year etc.

To the first interrogatory: that he hath known the alley called Chequer Alley in Long Southwark by the space of these 10 years or thereabouts.

To the second: that he doth know that there is a house in the east end of the said alley, a house commonly called the Cross House.

To the third: that he never knew the kitchen of the said Cross House to be let out by itself as a tenement from the said Cross House.

To the fourth: that the said Cross House during the time that he hath known the said alley, was ever taken and accounted to be of the said parish of St Olave's, and that they that have dwelled in the same went to St Olave's church as to their parish church, christened, married, and buried there, and paid their tithes and church duties thereunto, as to their parish church.  And saith that in the time while this deponent dwelled in the said alley, and kept a victualling house, the churchwardens

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or some of them did commonly use to come thither in service time to search if any were drinking or otherwise at any game within the times of morning and evening prayers, and if they found any such, that then they would take a distress of the vicualler for the same, to pay something for a pain to the poor folks' box.  But he saith that one Mr.  Bate that was master of the Bridge House and deputy of that ward, finding some drinking in this deponent's said house, in a time in the service time he this deponent being from home, did carry the persons whom he found drinking there to the Counter [i.e., prison].  And caused this deponent to be excommunicate by the Ordinary or his Chancellor, so as it cost this deponent before he could be discharged of that matter to the sum of 23s [£1 3s] or thereabouts.  And further saieth that in the Rogation Week, the minister and clerk and diverse of the parishioners of the said parish of St Olave, did yearly use to come into the said alley, and into the said Cross House, upon the perambulation day, as parcel of the boundary of the said parish.  And further saith that if any (as)sessment tax or tallage was put upon this deponent while he dwelled there, it was ever done as upon a mere parishioner of St Olave's parish, and in nowhere else.  And this is as much as he can [+depose] in this matter.

(signed) [Robert Deawar's mark]