Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy --- Go to Genealogy Page for Francis Doughty

Notes for Francis Doughty

c 1604 Francis Doughty was likely born about this time. [1]

1620 Ann Graves, Francis Doughty's second wife, was born 1620, daughter of Thomas Graves.

c 1626 Francis Doughty married Bridget. [2]

Ann Graves married successively three ministers of Hungars Parish, Accawmack. [3]

1632/33 "Eliah the sonne of Frauncis Doughtye" was baptized on "February the 24" at Rangeworthy, Gloucester. "Fr. Doughtie Curat de Rang. predict" is written at the bottom of the page of the parish register. At the top is written, "A note of all such persons names as were Baptized Wedded and Buried in the Rangery Anno Dom 1632." [4][5][6]

1634 Francis Doughty was mentioned in his father's will, "To my son Francis my white horse or nag." In a discussion of this will, Waters wrote, [7]

The above will and the deed to Humphrey Hooke and others, to which it refers, gave rise to a great contention in New England, as appears from Lechford's Note Book, pp. 133-5, 137, 171-3 and 256 (I refer to the pages of the printed book). Elizabeth Doughtie, the daughter and sole executrix of the ... testator, became the wife of William Cole in the parish of Chew Magna, in the County of Somerset, gentleman (as he calls himself in a bill of complaint to the Gov., Council and Assistants of the Jurisdiction of Massachusetts Bay) and brother of John Cole of Farrington, Somerset, Yeoman, who made a deposition about Hempsteed Farm in 1639. William and Elizabeth Cole Were then in New Engand, as was also her brother Francis Doughty, who at that time called himself a planter of Dorchester in New England. He was called a clerk in the bill of complaint by William Cole and his wife, and seems to have been a minister at Taunton, Mass., and afterwards to have removed to Long Island.

1637 Ann Graves married, first, before July 10 1637, the Rev. William Cotton, who on that date patented land in right of his wife Ann. [8]

1637-42 In an article about the Doughty family, Ethan Allen Doty wrote, [9]

About 1637 Rev. Francis Doughty, with others, purchased from the Plymouth Colony a tract of land at Taunton, Mass. He is reported to have come to Massachusetts 1639, and settled at Taunton, preaching there, but having some difficulties with the people he removed to Maspeth (now Newtown) on Long Island in New York State where we find him 1642. The Court Records and Acts of Legislature of Massachusetts Colony show that he had a lawsuit with his sister Elizabeth, wife of William Cole, extending through many years.

1639 "The Rev. Francis Doughty, who was the son of a Bristol alderman, and had been vicar of Sodbury, Gloucester, and arraigned before the High Court of Commissions for contempt of his sacred Majesty, having spoken of him in prayer as "Charles, by common election and general consent, King of England," came to Massachusetts in 1639" [10]

1640 William Cotton, in his will written in August 1640 (recorded 29 December 1646), named "Brethrin-in-Lawe Capt. William Stone and Captain William Roper" as overseers. [11][12]

1642-48 "The Third Puritan minister (in the State of N. Y.) was Francis Doughty. He had probably been Vicar of Sodbury, Gloucester, England. where he was silenced for Nonconformity. He emigrated to Taunton Mass., 1637." (Then follows an account of his differences there with the Church leading to his expulsion with his wife and child. This is taken from Thomas Lechford, Plain Dealing, 1642, p 40.) Doughty secured the conveyance of Mespat (near Newtown), L.I. with the view of establishing a Presbyterian colony there. The settlement was begun in 1642, but the Indian War broke up the colony in 1643, and the minister and flock went to Manhattan Island for shelter during the war. He became the first Puritan, and, indeed Presbyterian minister in New York City. He ministered here from 1643 to 1648 and was supported by voluntary contributions from the Puritans and Dutch of the city. He also preached at Flushing for a while. Owing to the failure of the colony Govs. Kieft and Stuyvesant sought to recover the claime upon Mespat, but Doughty declined to restore it. He was at last glad to escape from the wrath of Stuyvesant and fled to Maryland, where he preached to the Puritans for many years." [13]

c 1642 Francis Doughty, of Cohasset, settled at Long Island. [14]

Two years later, Long Island was again sought as a haven of refuge. The Reverend Francis Doughty1 was a preacher in Cohasset, then called Hingham, where a "controversie arose in the Church." Forced to leave his parish, he also, applied to the more liberal Hollanders for a grant of land. Kieft gave him, March 28, 1642, an absolute ground-brief of thirteen thousand three hundred and thirty-two acres on the Mespat, a grant in common, on which to found a town. A few men, among them Richard and John Smith of Taunton,2 came with Mr. Doughty, and the little village of Mespat was begun.

1. Francis Doughty, some time vicar of Sodbury, was there silenced for non-conformity. His son-in-law, Adrian van der Donck, wrote of him that Mr. Doughty came to New England to escape persecution, and there found that he "had got out of the frying-pan into the fire." His chief heresy was the assertion that Abraham's children should have received the rite of baptism.

2. Roger Williams writes of him: "Mr. Richard Smith who for his conscience to God left faire possessions in Gloucestershire and adventured with his Relations and Estates in New England and was a most acceptable Inhabitant and prime-leading man in Taunton in Plymouth Colony. For his Conscience's sake, many difficulties arising, he left Plymouth," etc.

1642 Ann Graves married, second, by 1642, the Rev. Nathaniel Eaton who came to Virginia from Massachusetts where in 1638 he had become the first master of the school that later became Harvard University. [15][16][17][18]

1642 Nathaniel Eaton was assigned land at Hungars Creek due him by right of intermarriage with the "widdowe and relict of William Cotton, Clerke" [19]

1642 On 28 March, Francis Doughty and associates patented 6,666 (Dutch) acres of land at Maspeth, Long Island (Latin). [20]

1642 The colony at Maspeth was destroyed by American Indians and the surviving European settlers escaped to Manhattan where Francis Doughty was a minister. The land of Francis Doughty was seized by the director. Doughty appealed and, for his remarks, was imprisoned for 24 hours and fined 25 guilders. [21]

1643 July 28. Patent. Richard Brutnel; 49 morgens, 131 rods of land on Long Island, adjoining master Doutey's fence (Newtown). [22]

1644-47 "The Rev. Francis Doughty, who, it seems, was in Taunton, Mass., at the time of its settlement, came to Long Island in 1644, and was the first minister of Flushing, probably a baptist, but afterwards turned Quaker; and it is believed that all the families of that name, in this part of the state, are the descendants of this gentleman. His salary was at first six hundred guilders, and in 1647, an order was issued by the council of New Amsterdam, to assess the inhabitants of Flushing for his salary, they having refused to pay it voluntarily. (This was the same Francis Doughty who was at Cohasset in 1642, and mentioned by Leechford in his "News from New England," as being dragged out of a public assembly, for asserting that Abraham's children should have been baptized, which harsh treatment may well account for his leaving that colony soon after.) It farther appears, that after his decease, an action was brought by his son, Elias Doughty, (named in Nicoll's and Dongan's patents,) in the year 1666, to recover the arrears of salary due to his father; but on its being shown that Gov. Stuyvesant had forced the town to sign the articles for the maintenance of the minister, "he taking the people into a room one after another, and threatening them, if they did not sign," the court ordered a part only of the amount claimed to be paid." [23]

1645 June 10, Court proceedings. Rev. Francis Douty vs. Willem Gerritsen, an Englishman, for libel, consisting of a defamatory song against plaintiff and his daughter; defendant pleads guilty; sentence, to stand bound to the May-pole in the fort, with two rods around his neck and the libel over his head, until the conclusion of the English sermon; and should he ever sing the song again, to be flogged and banished. [24]

1646 February 7, Court proceedings: Richard and William Smith vs. rev. Francis Douthy; plaintiffs demand that the defendant declare, in writing, who are his partners; ordered accordingly. [25]

1646 March 22, Rev. Mr. Doughty appointed a referee.

1647 June 4. Order. On a petition of Jan Hendricksen Steelman, praying a patent for a piece of land in Mespath, purchased by him from Francis Doughty [Douthey]; referred to a judgment against Douthey of 18th April, 1647 (not found). [26]

1640-48 Francis Doughty and several church members moved to Brooklyn, under Dutch rule [27]:

The first notice of Rev. Francis Doughty is found in the annals of Taunton and reads as follows:

['Cohannet. alias Taunton, is in Plymouth patent. There is a church gathered there of late, and some ten or twenty of the church, the rest excluded. Master Hooke, pastor; Master Street, teacher. One Master Doughty (Rev. Francis) opposed the gathering of the church there, alleging that according to the covenant of Abraham all men's children that were of baptized parents, and so Abraham's children, ought to be baptized, and so spake in public, or to that effect, which led to a disturbance, and the ministers spake to the magistrate to order him out, the magistrate commanded the constable who dragged Master Doughty out of the assembly.']

But for this disagreeable incident the Doughty family probably would never have played their part in the history of Brooklyn. Much excitement followed the church wrangle, and it resulted in about one hundred families leaving the Cohannet colony and following the fortunes of Mr. Doughty. By this it was determined to leave the English colonies and apply to the Dutch for a grant of land upon which they could settle and enjoy that freedom of conscience which the straight laced Puritans demanded for themselves, but were unwilling to accord to anyone else. With his wife and children Doughty proceded to the Island of Aquetneckt the present site of the city of Newport, R. I., where his friends soon joined him. A regular association was organized and Mr. Doughty sent to New York to interview Governor Kieft. So successful was this visit that the Dutch authorities immediately granted Mr. Doughty a tract of land of 13,332 acres at Maspeth, which embraced nearly the whole of Newtown, Maspeth and a part of Flushing. Here the Doughtyites settled in the year 1642, and from their efforts a successful colony was soon established. Indeed, its success was so great that it excited the jealousy of Kieft, as will presently be seen. The Doughty patent is recorded in the Secretary of State's office at Albany, book of patents, C. G., p. 49. It bears date March 28, 1642. Mr. Doughty seems to have been a chronic objector and a man of most decided opinions. Preaching to his flock weekly he took occasion to severely criticise certain acts of Governor Kieft's, and trouble was the result. The director and Council of the New Amsterdam colony in April, 1647, rescinded the Doughty patents, dividing the property among members of the association, leaving Mr. Doughty only his bouwery and the lands he had in possession. The Doughty bouwery occupied the land on the east of Flushing Bay, now known as Stevens' Point.

To the decision of Kieft Mr. Doughty strongly objected, regarding it as not only unjust, but in direct violation of his patent, therefore he appealed from the sentence, which offended Kieft who had previously cut off the right of appeal to the courts of Holland, and, telling Doughty that his judgment was final and absolute, the despotic governor fined the defenseless clergyman $10 and locked him up for twenty-four hours in the common jail. Discouraged at this, Mr. Doughty requested the director-general of New Netherland 'that as he had lived and done duty a long time without suitable support and as his land was now confiscated' he might be permitted to take ship for the West Indies or the Netherlands. The request was refused, as the director-general had no desire to have his acts laid before the diet. Later Mr. Doughty was minister at the Flushing church, where he preached a year for the sum of 600 guilders. He finally departed for the 'English Virginias' in 1648."

This is one side of the story-Doughty's side.

The colonial records show the Dutch view of the case to be different. Without going into this in detail, we will simply state that the Dutch claimed a debt of 1,100 florins from Mr. Doughty, which he refused to pay. It was out of this that the trouble arose. The last notice of this man is found in Dr. O'Callaghan's Colonial Documents where it reports a commissioner sent from New York to Maryland colony as saying that during a visit to Cecil, Lord Baltimore, he met Mr. Doughty at a dinner given by the Maryland governor and found him "looking much the same" as when be last saw him in New Amsterdam and very bitter against the Dutch. After the burning of Maspeth village by the Indians in 1643, Mr. Doughty sought refuge in New Amsterdam with all his followers. Here they resided for several years, Mr. Doughty purchasing property just outside the fort. Within the fort he established an English church and preached regularly to his flock. Thus the Rev. Francis Doughty was the first preacher in the English language in New York city "a fact we never saw commented on in any history of New York.

1645-47 A treaty was signed with the Indians and Francis Doughty returned to Long Island. [28]:

When the Indians were quieted, a few of the planters returned to the ashes of their homes and rebuilt their rude cabins. Mr. Doughty held himself as the Patroon of a Manor and demanded from every settler payment for the land taken up, and a yearly quit-rent. Suit was brought against him by Richard and William Smith representing the people, and was decided in their favour in 1647. [Van Tienhoven, replying to this "Remonstrance of Mespat," says: "Mr. Smith was one of the leaders of these people, for the said minister had scarcely any means of himself to build a hut, let alone to plant a colonie at his own expense." Mr. Doughty was in many ways obnoxious to the people. There is the record that William Gerretse "sings libellous songs against the Reverend Francis Doughty," for which he is sentenced to be tied to the Maypole.] He then went to Flushing, and finally ended his career in Virginia, while the Reverend John Moore succeeded him as preacher in Newtown.

1648 Francis Doughty departed Flushing, NY for the English Virginias; he had previously conferred on his daughter Mary, on her marriage, in 1645, with Adrian VonDerDonck, his farm on Flushing bay, now owned by Abraham and John Rapelye.

1657 March 25. Patent. Jan Hendricksen Steelman; 34 morgens, 563 rods of land, heretofore the bouwery of Mr. F. Douthy, at Mespat, Long island. [29]

1657 On 5 October, in a report on the condition of churches in New Amsterdam, Megapolensis and Drisius wrote: "We are at this time in great want of English ministers. It is more than two years since Mr. Doughty, of Flushing which is a town here, went to Virginia, where he is now a preacher. He left because he was not well supported. " [30]

1657 Ann Graves married, third, as his second wife, the Rev. Francis Doughty, with whom Ann entered into a marriage contract 1657, 08 June. [Northampton Co. Deeds & Wills 7, 1655-58, p48]. The Rev. Francis Doughty was formerly rector of Sodbury, Gloucestershire, and minister at Taunton, Mass., New York, and Flushing, Long Island. He entered into an agreement with the commissioners and housekeepers of the Lower Parish of Northampton County on 1654/5, 28 February, and they accepted him as their minister. [Northampton Co. Deeds, Wills &cc 5, 1654-55, page 117]. By October 1659 he had moved to Charles County, Maryland, and by April 1662 to Rappahannock County where Doughty was minister of Sittenbourne and South Farnham parishes, 1662-68. [Old Rappahannock County Record Bk. 1656-65, p. 256; Record Book 1668-72, p. 119]. In 1668 John Catlett and Humphrey Booth referred to his "nonconformity & Scandalous living" in a petition to the Governor and on 13 March, 1669/70, stating that he wished to "Transport myself out of the Colony of Virginia into some other country and clymate that may prove more favorable to my aged, infirm & decayed Body," Doughty conveyed to Richard Boughton of Charles Co, Md., 200 acres on the Rappahannock River for the use of his wife Anne, she being "unwilling to Depart the sd country, shee finding the same Best agreeing with her health, Besides her loathness and unwillingness to Bid Farewell to her more Deare & Beloved children, and to her Beloved kindred & Relacons, all or least most of them Residing in the sd Colony of Virginia and in the Neighboring province of Maryland. She moved from thence to Charles Co. Md where her will, 26 Dec 1682-18 July 1682 [Maryland Proprietary Wills 4, p. 210], named six of her eight grandchildren and her deceased son Samuel3 EATON : Francis Graves [Thomas 1], born about 1630, mentioned as "orphant of Capt. Thomas Graves," 1642 Nov 28, settled in Rappahannock County, where he patented 714 acres "on the south side of the River upon the branch of Gilson's Creek," 1672 October 10. He married by 1678 November Jane, a widow, and that date deeded cattle "to her three children...John and Jane Moguffe and Elizabeth Davenport," according to a "verbal agreement to my now wife JANE before marriage." He died by 5 August 1691 when a court order mentioned "the plantation of the widow Graves...between Hoskins and Gilsons pocoson." His widow [Jane] married [as her 4th husband] John Doughty of Essex County, who, 2 May 1694, "by reason of an intermarriage between me and the Widow Graves, do give unto the three children of Francis Graves, namely: Francis, Richard and Thomas Graves" certain cattle. [31][32]

1661 On 18 February, the inhabitants of Newtown, Long Island petitioned the governor that they may use the minister's house for school purposes, since Francis Doughty was no longer maintaining it. [33]

1668 On 15 April, John Catlett and Humphry Booth complained to Governor Berkeley about the non-conformity and scandalous living of Francis Doughty and requested that he be removed from the ministry of Sittingborne. [34]

1668/69 On 13 March, Francis Doughty planned to leave Virginia and granted land on the Rappahanock River to Richard Boughton, apparently for the use of his wife Ann Doughty, who planned to stay behind in Virginia. [35]

1669 A matter of difference between Francis Doughty of Newtown, on the behalf of Francis Doughty his father, heretofore minister of Flushing, and Mr. John Hicks, Capt John Underhill, and Mr. William Laurence, representing others of the town, concerning a yearly salary paid to Mr. Doughty for his pains as minister, was considered by the governor at Fort James in New York on 27 March. [36][37]

1685 The sons of Rev. Francis Doughty, viz: Francis, Charles, Elias and Jacob, of Flushing, petition for a grant of 250 acres each on L. I. [38]

1662 "Charles County Court of 8 Jul 1662 ... Petition of Thomas, atty. of George Short; at the last court he obtained attachment for 600# of tobacco due him from Mr. Francis Doughtie which he delivered to Mr. James Lindsey; Enock Doughtie produced letter appointing him attorney for his father, Francis Doughtie, minister of Rapahannock County, Virginia; 4 Jun 1662; /s/ Francis Doughtie; wit. John Washington, Arthur Turner, Samuell Eton." [39]

1655 Francis Doughty moved to Virginia [40]:

Since writing the above account of Rev. Francis Doughty, whose record was mainly obtained from official records in New York State and in England, I have received this further information through Mr. P. G. Burton of Washington, D., C., who for some time has been interested in the history of the Doughty family: Quoting Mr. Burton's letter it is as follows: "Rev. Francis Doughty went to Northampton County, Virginia, in 1655 (the year that his son-in-law, Adriaen Vanderdonck died) and became the Rector of an Episcopal church there. He was apparently well thought of, and one wealthy and influential woman (parishioner) directed in her will that he have charge of the rearing of her children.

Just what took Rev. Francis Doughty to Virginia I do not know, but I have a theory that the Rev. Samuel Drisius, who was a minister in New Amsterdam, and who was sent on a special mission to Virginia in December, 1653, may have had something to do with the move.

It is known that Drisius, while in Virginia, preached in the church of which Doughty was later Rector, There is a reference to the choosing of Doughty in the Northampton County records, but I have not yet been able to get a copy of it."

In 1658 Doughty married Ann Eaton, a widow with some property, and shortly after moved into Rappahannock County, where in 1662 he bought 200 acres of land. (In 1692 Rappahannock County was divided into what are now Essex and Richmond Counties)."

For several years Doughty was rector of two parishes, one on each side of the Rappahannock River.

In the summer of 1668 he had a lengthy "argument" with two of his parishioners, both prominent in political and social circles.

He refused to allow them to "communicate in the blessed ordinance of the Lord's Supper". and they brought charges of nonconformity and scandalous living, the particular kind of scandal not being specified.

The matter was before Gov. Berkeley, and referred by him to the County Commissioners for trial. What decision, if any, was reached, does not appear in any record that has survived.

In March, 1668-9, Doughty placed his farm in the hands of trustees for the benefit of his wife during her lifetime, and announced his intention of departing for "some other Countrey and Clymate that may prove more favorable to my aged, infirm and decayed body, than the said Countrey of Virginia wherein I now reside," his wife, however, being "unwilling to depart the said Countrey, she finding the same best agreeing with her health, besides her loathness and unwillingness to bidd farewell to her most deare and beloved children and to her beloved kindred and relations, all or at least most of them, residing in the said Colony of Virginia and the neighboring Province of Maryland."

On the same day. Rev. Francis Doughty deeded the reversion of this property to his son Enoch Doughty, who seems to have heretofore escaped the eye of the historian.

Enoch Doughty died in Virginia between 1675 and 1677 and willed his property to his children (not named) with instructions to his brother Francis, who was one of the executors, to sell all his property, because he wanted his children to move out of the country.

A memorandum attached to the will seems to show that in 1677 Francis Doughty, Jr., was in England. and among other things had some tobacco to sell for joint account of himself and his brother Enoch.

...

After the 18 of March, 1668-9, I find no record of Rev. Francis Doughty. Whether he went to Long Island and joined his son Elias or went back to England, is yet to be learned.

Ann (Eaton) Doughty died in Maryland in the spring of 1683, and as there was quite a contest of her estate, we get a much better chance to know her family than usual.

Her will left all of her property to her grand-children by her first and second husbands, and no mention is made of any Doughty.

From the legal papers filed in connection with the suit referred to, and from other facts of record it would seem that her first husband was a brother of the wife of Gov. William Stone of Maryland.

1682 The will of Ann (Graves) (Cotton) (Eaton) Doughty was dated on December 26, 1682, and was proved July 18, 1683. Bequests were made to several heirs [41][42]:

To grandchild Samuel Boughton the tract of land lying between Potomac River and the dwelling plantation of Samuel Eaton, my decd. son called 'Eaton's Delight,' containing 200 acres given by the will of sd Samuel dated October 17, 1679. To Samuel Boughton, Virlinda Boughton, Katherine Boughton and Mary Boughton, the four children of Richard Boughton, my horses and mares running in the woods, equally at time of age or day of marriage. To Sarah Doyne, the daughter of Robert Doyne, 1000 lbs. tobacco, it to be paid to Colonel William Chandler by John Hamilton out of his rent of 2000 lbs. Tobacco for the lease of the land; also to above Sarah a gold ring and a necklace. To Colonel William Chandler, and if he die to his brother Richard Chandler for the use of my grandchildren, Parthenia Burdett, ex'trix and Sarah Burdett, ex'trix all the remainder of my estate, both real and personal equally. Witnesses: John Stone, John Hamilton, Nicholas Swinburne.

1683/84 On 3 March, Francis Doughty, deceased, was mentioned in a deed of Rappahannock County, Virginia. [43]

Research Notes:

See also: [44][45][46][47][48][49][50][51]


Footnotes:

[1] John Anderson Brayton, "The Ancestry of the Reverend Francis Doughty of Massachusetts, Long Island, Amsterdam, Maryland, and Virginia," The American Genealogist 77 (2002), 1-17, 127-136, 289, at 127, [AmericanAncestors].

[2] John Anderson Brayton, "The Ancestry of the Reverend Francis Doughty of Massachusetts, Long Island, Amsterdam, Maryland, and Virginia," The American Genealogist 77 (2002), 1-17, 127-136, 289, at 127, [AmericanAncestors].

[3] John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5: Families G-P (Genealogical Publishing Co, 2004), 133, [GoogleBooks].

[4] Rangeworthy Bishop's Transcripts, GDR/V1/192, 1575-81, 1601, 1605-07, 1609, 1612-13, 1617, 1620, 1622-25, 1628-29, 1632, 1637-40, ?1662, 1663-65, 1667-72, 1674, 1676-98, 1700-26, 1729-32, 1734-1812, Gloucestershire Archives, Gloucestershire, England, Gloucestershire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1813, [AncestryImage].

[5] Leslie Mahler, "The English Ancestry of Richard Dole of Newbury, Massachusetts with a Note on Francis Doughty, Minister of Long Island," The American Genealogist 74 (1999), 53-57, at 57, provides a description of this record from the Rangeworth parish register, stating that "In 1632 one Fr. Doughtie was curate at Rangeworthy, and on 24 February 1632[/33], 'Eliah son of Francis Doughty' was baptized there." The article cites FHL film 417152, [AmericanAncestors].

[6] Bishop's transcripts for Rangeworthy, a chapelry in the parish of Thornbury, 1575-1812, Microfilm of original records in the Gloucester City Library, England, FHL film 417152, [FHLCatalog].

[7] Henry F. Waters, "Genealogical Gleanings in England," New England Historical and Genealogical Register 48 (1894), 105-44, 241-76, 373-408, at 119, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[8] W. G. Stanard, "Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 6 (1899), 404-406, at 404, Patent Book 1-497, [GoogleBooks].

[9] Ethan Allen Doty, "The Doughty Family of Long Island," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 43 (1912), 273-87, 312-24, at 274, [InternetArchive].

[10] Edward Duffield Neill, "The Doughty Family of Long Island," The English Colonization of America During the Seventeenth Century (London: Strahan & Co, 1871), 326, [GoogleBooks].

[11] Northampton County, Virginia Deeds Wills [Orders] etc., 1645-51, 55.

[12] John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5: Families G-P (Genealogical Publishing Co, 2004), 133, [GoogleBooks].

[13] Rev. Chas. A. Briggs, D.D., "Puritanism in New York," Magazine of American History 13 (1885), 39-58, 41, [GoogleBooks].

[14] Martha Bockée Flint, Early Long Island, a colonial study, 163-164, [HathiTrust].

[15] Sharon J. Doliante, Maryland and Virginia Colonials: Genealogies of Some Colonial Families: families of Bacon, Beall, Beasley, Cheney, Duckett, Dunbar, Ellyson, Elmore, Graves, Heydon, Howard, Jacob, Morris, Nuthall, Odell, Peerce, Reeder, Ridgley, Prather, Sprigg, Wesson, Williams (Baltimore, MD : Genealogical Pub. Co., 1991), 324, [GoogleBooks].

[16] Edward Lewis Goodwin, The Colonial Church in Virginia (London: 1927), 266, [GoogleBooks].

[17] Colonial churches: in the original colony of Virginia by especially qualified writers (Richmond, Virginia: c1907), 103, [HathiTrust].

[18] Jennings C. Wise, Ye kingdome of Accawmacke; or, The Eastern Shore of Virginia in the seventeenth century (Richmond, Va., The Bell book and stationery co., 1911), 260-263, includes speculations, some incorrect, [HathiTrust].

[19] John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5: Families G-P (Genealogical Publishing Co, 2004), 134, citing Patent Book 1, page 823, [GoogleBooks].

[20] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 366, citing Vol G.G., p 49, [InternetArchive].

[21] Mary Powell Bunker, Long Island Genealogies (Albany: Joel Munsell Sons, 1895), 198, [GoogleBooks].

[22] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 368, citing Vol G.G., p 85, [InternetArchive].

[23] Charles Werner and Benjamin F. Thompson, History of Long Island, 2nd edition, Vol. 2 (1843), 70, [GoogleBooks].

[24] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 95, citing Vol IV., p 224, [InternetArchive].

[25] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 107-8, citing Vol IV., p 283, [InternetArchive].

[26] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 149, citing Vol VI, p 53, [InternetArchive].

[27] Ethan Allen Doty, "The Doughty Family of Long Island," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 43 (1912), 273-87, 312-24, at 275, citing the Brooklyn (New York) Daily Eagle, correspondent signing himself an "Old Brooklynite," in the issue of June 7th. 1891, [InternetArchive].

[28] Martha Bockée Flint, Early Long Island, a colonial study, 165, [HathiTrust].

[29] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part I, Dutch (1865), 385, citing Vol II.II, p 94, [InternetArchive].

[30] Patricia Law Hatcher and Edward H. L. Smith III, "Reexamining the Family of Rev. John Moore of Newtown, Long Island," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 137 (2006), 258-263, at 258.

[31] Research Note (citation not recorded): Essex County, Virginia, Deeds & Wills 6, page 296.

[32] John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5: Families G-P (Genealogical Publishing Co, 2004), 134, see, also 3rd edition, p 327-328, [GoogleBooks].

[33] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 496, [GoogleBooks].

[34] Rappahannock County Records, "Rev. Francis Doughty," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 5 (1898), 288-290, at 288, [HathiTrust].

[35] Rappahannock County Records, "Rev. Francis Doughty," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 5 (1898), 288-290, at 289, [HathiTrust].

[36] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 619, [GoogleBooks].

[37] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 629, [GoogleBooks].

[38] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, Calendar of N.Y. Colonial Manuscripts, Indorsed Land Papers; In the Office of the Secretary of State of New York 1643-1803 (Albany, New York: Weed, Parsons & Co, 1864), 32, [GoogleBooks].

[39] Elise Greenup Jourdan, Abstracts of Charles County, Maryland Land and Court Records, 1658-1666, Vol. I (2009), 94, [GoogleBooks].

[40] Ethan Allen Doty, "The Doughty Family of Long Island," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 43 (1912), 273-87, 312-24, at 275, citing Mr. P. G. Burton of Washington, D.C, [InternetArchive].

[41] Maryland Colonial Wills, 1682-1688, G, 4, 210, [MD_Archives_Will_Book_Catalog], [MD_Archives_Will_Book_Download_(slow)].

[42] Mrs. P. W. Hiden, "Three Rectors of Hungar's Parish and Their Wife," William and Mary Quarterly, Second Series 19 (1939), 34-41, 235, 299-301, at 299-301, Will Book 4, page 210, Hall of Records, Annapolis, Maryland.

[43] John Anderson Brayton, "The Ancestry of the Reverend Francis Doughty of Massachusetts, Long Island, Amsterdam, Maryland, and Virginia," The American Genealogist 77 (2002), 1-17, 127-136, 289, at 127, [AmericanAncestors].

[44] Hugh Hastings, Ecclesiastical Records, State of New York, Vol. 1 (Albany: 1901), 137, [HathiTrust].

[45] Hugh Hastings, Ecclesiastical Records, State of New York, Vol. 1 (Albany: 1901), 258, [HathiTrust].

[46] Hugh Hastings, Ecclesiastical Records, State of New York, Vol. 1 (Albany: 1901), 410, [HathiTrust].

[47] Hugh Hastings, Ecclesiastical Records, State of New York, Vol. 1 (Albany: 1901), 453, [HathiTrust].

[48] Hugh Hastings, Ecclesiastical Records, State of New York, Vol. 1 (Albany: 1901), 500, [HathiTrust].

[49] Hugh Hastings, Ecclesiastical Records, State of New York, Vol. 1 (Albany: 1901), 600-601, [HathiTrust].

[50] Mary Powell Bunker, Long Island Genealogies (Albany: Joel Munsell Sons, 1895), 198, of 198-199, [GoogleBooks].

[51] Thomas Patrick Hughes, Frank Munsel, eds., American Ancestry: Giving Name and Descent, in the Male Line, Vol. 10, (1895), 119, [GoogleBooks].


Citation: Robert and Janet Chevalley Wolfe, Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy, "Notes for Francis Doughty"
Webpage: www.umich.edu/~bobwolfe/gen/pn/p5391.htm
Email address: JanetRobertWolfeGenealogy@gmail.com
Go to Genealogy Page for Francis Doughty
Go to Doughty surname index.
Go to Home Page for Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy