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Notes for Thomas Hicks and Mary Doughty

1658/9 On March 8, Thomas Hicks was listed in a rate for the expenses in Hempstead, Long Island. [1][2] Mrs. Washburn, the first wife of Thomas Hicks, appears on the same list, suggesting that Thomas and Mary (Butler) Washburn married after the date of the tax rate list. [3] Mary's first husband appears on lists of cows in 1658, suggesting that John Washburn died between 1658 and 8 Mar 1658/59.

1659 Thomas Hicks was listed among "persons that are to fense and Inclose Rockoway w'th ye Nomb'r of their gates donn at A full town-meeting the 17th of Aprill 1659." [4]

1659/60 Thomas Hicks requested items left to his stepson John Washburn. [5]

February 19.— Thomas Hicks, in behalf of his wife, Mary, late wife of John Washburn, deceased, demands certain legacies bequeathed by William Washburn to his son John: Imprimis, one-third of Mr. Washburn's meadow; item, two sows, one yearling, one pestle and mortar, two ox-pastures and five gates in the Neck. The Court order the above to be delivered to plaintiff, for the use of John Washburn, Jr.

1662 On 30 November, Thomas Hickes was granted liberty to take in land ... in the boundes of Hempsted: lot 5. Mr. John Kicks was assigned lot 7. [6]

1663 On 16 January, "There was given and granted to Mr. Robart Ashman, Thomas Hickes, John Ellison, Hope Washburne and Abraham Smith, the whole point of upland at Rockaway, commonly called by the name of the Northwest Point "... [7]

1663 On 19 October, Robert Ashman of Hempstead sold several tracts to Richard Ellison, including a meadow on the Neck commonly called "Mr Washbornes Neck", bounded on the east by Thomas Hicks. [8]

1663 Thomas Hicks was granted land at Madnan's Neck. [9]

1663, December 14. — Agreed that Thomas Hicks, John and Thomas Ellison shall have the Little Neck, or point of land on the east side of Mathew Garison's bay, which neck is commonly called Madnan's Neck, in lieu of their dividend, on condition that they forthwith go, possess and build on it. — B., 35.

1664 On 15 February, Thomas Hicks was chosen Town Clerk of Hempstead, and to have the wages that the clerk used to have. [10]

1664 On 23 March, Thomas Hicks witnessed and recorded a deed between Simon Seren and Thomas Fessee in Hempstead. [11]

1664 On 12 May, Thomas Hicks and others, "Inhabitants of Hempstead made freemen of Connecticut." [12]
1665 Thomas Hicks was appointed to record horses in the town of Hempstead. [13]

May 20. — Thomas Hicks is chosen by the constable and eight men to record all horses and horse kind, and brand them and other cattle that are transported (that is, sold), and he is to have 6d. a piece for horses and a penny a piece for cattle. Samuel Denton is chosen pender. — B., 54.

1665/66 On 12 March, Thomas Hicks, clerk, witnessed a deed between Richard Lattin of Huntintowne and John Carman of Hempstead for a lot formerly owned by Thomas forlers [Fowler?]. [14]

1666 Thomas Hicks "obtained from Governor Nicolls a patent for four thousand acres of land including Great Neck, Long Island, and lands adjacent, and lived there in English manorial style." [15] On 1 January, 1666/67, governor Richard Nicholls wrote to the constable and overseers of Flushing, Long Island that he was tired of the hearing about the issue of Thomas Hicks and wanted the town to resolve the issue. Thomas Hicks and two others had settled on the Neck, which the court of Hempstead had decided to be in Flushing, but Flushing had not laid out accommodations for the men, even though they agreed to pay the charges. [16]

1666 As described in a later deed dated 1687, on February 21, 1666, Thomas Hicks sold one third part of a certain Neck of land called Madnans Little Neck to Richard Cornell. The land had been granted by patent to Thomas HIcks. [17]

1666 In testimony recorded in the Hempstead town records of 1688, Thomas Hicks recalled that as town clerk in 1666, he had heard an agreement made between William Thickstone and William Seadin. [18]

1672 On 10 June, the council minutes for Long Island affairs reported the [election] returns for constable of Hempstead with 39 votes for Robert Jackson and 34 votes for Simon Seryou. Objection was made by Mr John Hicks [named as Thomas Hicks on the next page] and James Pine, on behalf of others, that many of the votes for Mr. Jackson were from great Neck or Mad-nans Neck, with only small, divided, parcels of land unrelated to the town of Hempstead, and questioned whether they should be counted equally with ye ancient inhabitants. The council determined that all the inhabitants were freeholders and their votes would count, although a proposal would be considered for them to be in a separate town with officers of their own. [19]

1675 On 23 November, governor E Andros declared that heretofore, in the time of governor Richard Nicolls, the Neck called Cornbury, or Little Madnans Neck where Captain Thomas Hicks doth reside was adjudged to be in Flushing, since which [time] it hath been found that the part of the land on the said Neck, belonging to Capt. Thomas Hicks is within the bounds of Hempstead, where he hath a considerable interest and is now justice of the peace for that town and Riding. [20]

1677 On 6 July, Thomas Hicks and Mary Doughty got a marriage license in New York. [21]

1679/80 On 19 January, William Haviland wrote to governor Edmund Andros as follows: "May it please your Honour: Whereas it hapens a difference or dispute between Mr. Hicks & Mr. Cornell with myself concerning a tract of land formerly belonging to Mr. Dowtie [Doughty] a full & equal third whereof I have bought of the said Dowtie as by the transport and patent may appear part of which my said purchase or equal third is by the said Mr. Cornell & Mr. Hicks demanded or claimed though it be my right & property, I therefore humbly pray for a fair decision of the said controversy that your honour would be pleased to appoint fit & indifferent persons to measure or survey the whole that each may quietly have & enjoy his right which is the desire of your humble servant. The 19th of January 79-80. Will'm Haviland. To his Excellence Sr Edmund Andros, K'nt Seigneur of Sausmaurez, Lieutenant and Governor Gen'l under his Royall Highness of all his Territories in America." [22]

1679/80 On 19 January, William Haviland wrote to governor Edmund Andros as follows: "The Humble Petition of William Haviland. Sheweth. That your Excellences Patron Brother in Law [perhaps referring to Haviland, himself] Capt. Thomas Hicks did in the year 1666 obtain a patent from Governor Nicholls for a certain neck of Land called Madnans Neck within the limitts of the town of Flushing the which by consent & agreement was divided into equall thirds between him, Mr. Richard Cornell, and Mr. Elyas Doughty. That presently after the settlement being twelve years ago (the Patron bought Mr. Doughtys interest in his third of the said land and hath inhabited thereupon) or part thereof ever since but finds himself encroached upon by his neighbours Mr. Cornell & Mr. Hicks and is debarred by them of having his the proportion of ye neck so purchased by him there being only three lots laid out, besides their own accommodation, and the rest left in common, which if divided might be better improved. That your patron hath often desired a division might be made of the said neck so that each proprieter might know his share and proportion the which hath been promised but hitherto delayed and neglected. That now his neighbors Mr. Cornell & Mr. Hicks having settled their son in law John Washburn on one of the three lots last laid out Mr. Cornell is settling his other son in law John Laurence on commons of said neck under pretense of purchase of other lands thereby which will be much to the damage and prejudice of the patron. He therefore humbly prays your Excellence that a stop be put to the intended settlement of the said John Laurence in that place, & and that some person or persons be appointed to make an equal division of the said neck between them, so that your patron be not frustrated of his Right and his Labour on said Land. Will Haviland." [23][24]

1684 On 14 April, "We underwritten Tachapowsha (and other named) Indyans" ... "freely and absolutely sold" to "Elias Doughty, ... Thomas Hicks, Richard Cornell, ... the agents of the freeholders of said Towne, ... the inhabitants of Flushing in general." [25]

1684 On 10 April, Indian deed. Opson son and heyre to Sacpousha, to Richard Cornell Senior and Thomas Hicks Senior, land on Cow Neck. Bounded on the north with land of John West. [26]

1685 On 25 April, Thomas Hicks of Cornbury to John Jurians of New York, merchant. On 26 April, John Juians of New York, merchant, and Mary his wife, to Gerrardus Beakman of Flatbush, chirurgeon, and Hendrick Ryke of Flatbush, blacksmith, land on Madnan's Neck in Hempstead, No 35, which was laid out to John Hicks. 130 acres. [27]

1685 On 20 October, Thomas Hicks and others were commissioned as justices of the peace for Queens County, Long Island, NewYork. [28]

1685 On 20 October, Thomas Hicks was commissioned as sheriff for Queens County, Long Island, NewYork. [29]

1686 On 15 January, Thomas Hicks sold to John Treadwell, land called "faire feld hollow" on the southwest side of the town [Hempstead]. [30]

1686 On 18 October, "Description of a survey of 100 acres of land, lying at Cow Neck, upon Long Island, laid out for Thomas Hicks, senr., by Leonard Beckwith, [with draught,]" [31]

1687 On 5 April, Thomas Hicks posted a list of the inhabitants of Hempstead who could take up 50 acres of land, as did the original proprieters. [32]

1687 On 16 April, Thomas Hicks posted notice that the major portion of inhabitants of Madnans Neck agreed that no new vacant land would be improved and no more trees would be cut down in the area. [33]

1687 On 5 November, Thomas Hicks of Cornbury and Mary, his wife, to Edward Stevenson of Newtown. Land on Cow Neck, 100 acres. Bounded as by pattent of Coll. Thomas Dungan November 25 1686. [34][35]

1687 On 12 December. Deed. To all Christian People to whom these presence Shall Come Greeting. Know ye yt we thomas & mary hickes of Cornbery necke in ye Jurisdiction of Flushing in Queens County upon Long Island have granted bargained alienated and Sold and do by these presence grant bargain alienate make over Confirm and Sell from us our heirs executors administrators to and assigns unto Jonathan Smith of the towne of hempstead in ye afore sd County and Island his haires executors administrators to and asignes for Ever a Sartaine Lott of meddow containing twenty Eight aceors more or Les as it was Laid out situatte & Lying one Merrick buted and bounded as followeth westerly by Richard Gildersleeve north w'th Little Smith Est by ye Cold Spring River South by the Bay yt Runs betwixt ye meddoe and ye beech with all ye Salt meddoe that Lys on ye west side of ye Cold Springe neck as far as any Salt grese grows with all ye Rightes proffite and Previledges there unto beLonging by vertue of any towne order or other wise for and in Consideration of full Satisfaction to me in hand paid for ye which I ye afore sd thomas hickes doe fuly exonerate aquit ... [36]

1687 Thomas Hicks senior of Cornbery, Long Island, sold to John Tredwell land called "Mr Hickes neck" that was previously owned by Thomas Hicks's father John Hicks, who owned it by agreement with John Carman senior. [37]

1688 On 25 August, Sr Edmund Andross appointed "as our justice to keep our peace in our county called Queens" Thomas Hicks (and others). Also appointed Thomas Hicks as "Judge of our inferior court of pleas". [38]

1688 On 27 November, Richard Cornell, gent of Cornwell Hall in Queens county sold land in Huntingtowne, Suffolk County, to Thomas Hickes of Hempstead. [39]

1690 A letter from Mr. Van Cortland to Sir Edmund Andros [governor of New York] stated: "It is now nere 17 weekes that I have been forced out off my house, by the violence of Capt'n Laysler," ... so is Mr Hix [in prison] "for not delivering up his Commission as Justice off Peace". [40]

1691 Thomas Hicks was appointed judge in Queens County for a term of 8 years. [41]

1693 On 20 April, Thomas Hicks [Hix] was the judge for the court of common pleas in Queens county, Long Island, New York. [42]

1694 Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Hicks was an overseer for the will of Richard Cornell. [43]

1697 Thomas Hicks was an overseer of the will of Jerwin Rootes. Life estate to wife Willmet, including the house & lands I bought of Nicholas Simpkins of Muscoto Cove, with remainder to my son Peter Rootes. Son Peter when of age also to have my clothes, three dozen plaite buttons, a sealed ring, a silver hat band, and one pair of plate breeches buttons. To my daus. Dorathy Snethen & Phebe Rootes furniture, gold rings with stones, spoons, etc. To my wife's dau Elizabeth Coles pewter plates, gold ring, etc. To my wife's three sons Derrick, William & Garrett & two sons-in-law Samuel Coles & Nicholas Snethen each a Holland Neck cloth. The negroes to my wife. Executrix: wife, solely. Overseers: Thomas Hicks, & Thos. Barker. Witness: John Cornwell, Sr., Tho. Hicks, Jr. & Tho. Barker. Died before 1697 May 23. Proved 1697 May 23. [44][45]

1698 Justice Thomas [Hicks] Hukes and Mrs. Mary, his wife, lived with sons Isaac, Benjamin, Charles, William, Stephen, Charet, and daughter Mary in Flushing, Long Island, New York, nine persons besides six servants. [46][47][48]

1701-2 Thomas Hicks was a representative for Queens County to the 8th Colonial Assembly. The Assembly was dissolved May 3, 1702. [49]

1701 On 30 December, Thomas Hicks and four others signed "in behalf of ourselves and upwards of two thirds of the freeholders and inhabitants of Queens County on Nassau Island" a letter from New York to the King William III, expressing "lively and gratefull sense, that our Religion and Liberties are in the greatest safety under your auspicious Reign". [50]

1702 On 11 April, Thomas Hicks Jr, of Flushing, Long Island, sold 180 acres to John Moss of Stradford, New England. [51]

1706 Thomas Hicks and others were chosen by vote of freeholders at a town meeting in Hempstead to "run all the lines of our towns bounds". [52]

1710 By vote of the majority of freeholders of Hempstead, the four trustees; William Nicoll, Coll John Jackson, Judge Hicks, and Justice John Tredwell; were to agree with John Keeble for a parcel at Rockaway for the whale men to cut fire wood for "the use of the whalling design". [53]

1710 Thomas Hicks, perhaps this one or his son, witnessed the will of William Urquehart. [54]

1715 The will of Elizabeth Regnier stated "To Regnier Rushmore, nephew of Thomas Hicks, of Long Island." [55]

1717 On 9 May, a deed by Thomas Hicks of Flushing refers to "my late son Charles Hicks deceased" and "the homestead that the said Charles lately lived upon" and "whereas my said son Charles Hicks" died leaving "one son called Edward an infant of the age of eight years". [56]

Descendant Notes:

1727-41 In the name of God, Amen. I, Thomas Hicks, of Flushing, in Queens County, Gent., being in good health. I leave to my grand son, Thomas Hicks, the eldest son and heir of my son Thomas Hicks, deceased, the sum of 5 shillings. I leave to my son Isaac "my Great History Book which is called Speeds Chronicle of England." I leave to my son Benjamin, my silver Tankard. I leave to my son Stephen, all my houses, lands, and meadows, in the bounds of Flushing or Queens County, except my right on the Great Plain in Hempstead; Also a bed and furniture and the remainder of my books, and two Hatchells, and my wearing apparell. I leave to my 6 sons, John, Joseph, Isaac, Benjamin, William, and Stephen, all my right on the Great Plain in Hempstead. To my daughter, Phebe Simmons, £100. To my daughter Charity, £250. To my daughter, Mary Bushlar, £100. I leave to my grand daughter, Mary Hicks, daughter of my son William Hicks, my silver tumbler. All the rest of my personal property to my 4 daughters, Phebe, Elizabeth, Charity, and Mary, and to my grand daughter, Sarah Everitt. My Indian and negro slaves, and my live stock, are to remain for my son Stephen. My sons Benjamin and Stephen are to be serviceable to my daughter Charity in her affairs. I make my son Stephen executor. Dated May 15, 1727. Witnesses, Cornelius Van Wyck, John Washburn, T. Whitehead. Proved, January 28, 1741/2. [57]

1742 "Sometime ago died in Queen's County, Col. Thomas Hicks, aged above Ninety Years, who left behind him of his own Offspring above 300 Children, Grand Children, great Grand Children, and great great Grand Children." [58]

1811 Elias Hicks (1748-1830), Quaker preacher and liberal religious leader, wrote "Observations on the Slavery of the Africans and Their Descendants" (1811), a major document in the development of the antislavery conscience in America. He became the founder of the Hicksite "branch" of the Society of Friends. His message combined the ancient mystical doctrine of the nearness and willingness of God to guide the individual with his fresh emphasis on the full use of human reason. [Forbush, op. cit., forward p. viii and preface p. xiv]

“John [Hicks] of Hempstead, Long Island, was the first of many Hickses who became magistrates, judges, captains of militia, treaty-makers with the Indians, and delegates to colonial assemblies. After John came Thomas, a Justice of the Common Pleas Court. Thomas defended Samuel Bownas, a Quaker in difficulty with the Hempstead churchmen, for attacking their doctrines and ceremonies [59]. This defense, mentioned by Elias with satisfaction in his Journal, introduced the Hicks family to the enthusiastic Quakers then invading Long Island.

"Jacob Hicks, son of Thomas the Justice, was impressed by the earnestness of the Friends although he, like his father, was a staunch Anglican, serving as a church warden and vestryman of St. George's Church at Hempstead. His wife, Hannah Carpenter, daughter of a founder of the Baptist Church in America, held Nonconformist views. Thomas Chalkely, an itinerant Quaker minister of power, made two visits in the neighborhood, lodging with Jacob and Hannah. After these visits Jacob ceased to be a vestryman, although he did not become a Quaker. It was not easy for a churchman to join a sect whose prophets in the previous generation created tumult and incited ridicule when preaching in the open fields. On occasions Friends were still moved by visions and revelations. This lingering emotionalism disturbed Jacob Hicks, yet he was willing to open his home for a monthly gathering of Friends for worship.

"Jacob's son John, who was Elias' father, influenced by the gatherings held in Jacob's house, longed to possess the great joy which came to Friends through their certainty of the forgiveness and love of God...He finally joined the Society by convincement a few years before the birth of Elias, and became a faithful member of Westbury Monthly Meeting.” [60]

Research notes:

Thomas Hicks "was a Justice of the Peace, High Sheriff of Queens County, 1702-3, Captain in the Queens County Troop 1686, member of the Assembly, appointed by Governor Andros, Judge of Common Pleas in Queen's County, 1691-1699. 'In 1666 he obtained from Governor Nicoll a patent for about four thousand acres of land near Little Neck, L. I., where he built a good house and lived like a 'Lord of the Manor' for many years.' He was an outstanding personality, and lived to the age of 100 years. The newspapers of the times state that he left behind more than three hundred descendants." [61][62]

1691 On day 30 of month 9, Francis Doughty, Charles Doughty, Elias Doughty, Thomas Hickes (perhaps this one or his son), and others, witnessed the marriage of Benjamin Field and Hannah Bowne at Flushing, Long Island, New York. [63]


Footnotes:

[1] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 69, [InternetArchive].

[2] Henry Onderdonk, The Annals of Hempstead; 1643 to 1832 (Hempstead, NY: Lott Van de Water, 1878), 38, [HathiTrust].

[3] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 68, [InternetArchive].

[4] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 82, [InternetArchive].

[5] Henry Onderdonk, The Annals of Hempstead; 1643 to 1832 (Hempstead, NY: Lott Van de Water, 1878), 24, [HathiTrust].

[6] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 130, [InternetArchive].

[7] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 130, [InternetArchive].

[8] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 2 (1897), 388, [InternetArchive].

[9] Henry Onderdonk, The Annals of Hempstead; 1643 to 1832 (Hempstead, NY: Lott Van de Water, 1878), 44, [HathiTrust].

[10] Henry Onderdonk, The Annals of Hempstead; 1643 to 1832 (Hempstead, NY: Lott Van de Water, 1878), 44, [HathiTrust].

[11] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 1 (1896), 159, of 159-60, [InternetArchive].

[12] Henry Onderdonk, The Annals of Hempstead; 1643 to 1832 (Hempstead, NY: Lott Van de Water, 1878), 44, citing Trumbull's Conn. Rec, i., 429, [HathiTrust].

[13] Henry Onderdonk, The Annals of Hempstead; 1643 to 1832 (Hempstead, NY: Lott Van de Water, 1878), 45, [HathiTrust].

[14] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 2 (1897), 139, [InternetArchive].

[15] William W. H. Davis, with Warren S. Ely and John W. Jordan, ed., History of Bucks County Pennsylvania, 2nd ed., Vol. III (1905), 111, [GoogleBooks], [HathiTrust].

[16] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 591, [GoogleBooks].

[17] Charles T Gritman, Historical Miscellany (NY?: 1920?), 1_399, QR271, Liber B1-122, [AncestryImage].

[18] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 2 (1897), 29, [InternetArchive].

[19] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 667, of 667-68, [GoogleBooks].

[20] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 707, [GoogleBooks].

[21] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Names of Persons for whom Marriage Licenses were Issued by the Secretary of the Province of New York, Previous to 1784 (Albany: Weed, Parsons and Company 1860), 182, [InternetArchive].

[22] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 744, [GoogleBooks].

[23] B. Fernow, Documents relating to the History of the Early Colonial Settlements principally on Long Island (Albany, 1883), 744, of 744-45, [GoogleBooks].

[24] Alfred Henry Bellot, History of the Rockaways from the year 1685 to 1917 (Far Rockaway, New York: Bellot's Histories, 1917), 17, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[25] Charles T Gritman, Historical Miscellany (NY?: 1920?), 1_392, QR222, Liber B1-1, [AncestryImage].

[26] Charles T Gritman, Historical Miscellany (NY?: 1920?), 1_393, QR225, Liber B1-12, [AncestryImage].

[27] Charles T Gritman, Historical Miscellany (NY?: 1920?), 1_394, QR236, Liber B1-40, 42, [AncestryImage].

[28] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part II, English (1865), 141, [InternetArchive].

[29] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part II, English (1865), 141, [InternetArchive].

[30] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 2 (1897), 118, [InternetArchive].

[31] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, Calendar of N.Y. Colonial Manuscripts, Indorsed Land Papers; In the Office of the Secretary of State of New York 1643-1803 (Albany, New York: Weed, Parsons & Co, 1864), 43, [GoogleBooks].

[32] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 2 (1897), 17, [InternetArchive].

[33] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 2 (1897), 101, [InternetArchive].

[34] Charles T Gritman, Historical Miscellany (NY?: 1920?), 1_398, QR267, Liber B1-111, [AncestryImage].

[35] Charles T Gritman, Historical Miscellany (NY?: 1920?), Index of Thomas Hicks deeds, [AncestryImage].

[36] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 2 (1897), 41, of 41-43, [InternetArchive].

[37] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 2 (1897), 111, of 111-12, [InternetArchive].

[38] Charles T Gritman, Historical Miscellany (NY?: 1920?), 1-388, citing QR175, Liber A p 36, [AncestryImage].

[39] Charles T Gritman, Historical Miscellany (NY?: 1920?), 1_400, QR280, Queens County Deeds, Liber B1-144, [AncestryImage].

[40] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., and John Romeyn Brodhead, Documents relative to the Colonial History of the State of New York: Procured in Holland, England, and France Vol. 3, (Albany: Weed, Parson & Company, 1858), 716, [HathiTrust].

[41] Stephen C. Hutchins and Edgar Albert Werner, Civil List and Constitutional History of the Colony and State of New York (Albany, New York: 1891), 539, [GoogleBooks].

[42] Christopher Morgan and Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, The Documentary History of the State of New York, Vol. 1 (1849), 316, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[43] William S. Pelletreau, Abstracts of Wills on file in the Surrogate's office: city of New York, Vol. 1, 1665-1707 (New York: The New York Historical Society, 1893), 242, Will 5-6.45, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[44] Henry B. Hoff, Long Island Source Records from the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1987), 135, [AncestryImage], [GoogleBooks].

[45] Amos Canfield, "Abstracts of Early Wills of Queens County, New York, recorded in Libers A and C of Deeds" New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 65 (1934), 114-120, 245-251, 319-328, at 246.

[46] Christopher Morgan and Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, The Documentary History of the State of New York, Vol. 1 (1849), 661, left column, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[47] Charles T Gritman, Historical Miscellany (NY?: 1920?), [AncestryImage].

[48] Ethan Allen Doty, "The Doughty Family of Long Island," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 43 (1912), 273-87, 312-24, at 281, [InternetArchive].

[49] Stephen C. Hutchins and Edgar Albert Werner, Civil List and Constitutional History of the Colony and State of New York (Albany, New York: 1891), 446, [GoogleBooks].

[50] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., and John Romeyn Brodhead, Documents relative to the Colonial History of the State of New York: Procured in Holland, England, and France Vol. 4, (Albany: Weed, Parson & Company, 1854), 938, [HathiTrust].

[51] Charles T Gritman, Historical Miscellany (NY?: 1920?), 1_391, QR211, Liber A-199, [AncestryImage].

[52] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 2 (1897), 298, [InternetArchive].

[53] Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead Long Island N.Y., Vol. 2 (1897), 394, [InternetArchive].

[54] William S. Pelletreau, Abstracts of Wills on file in the Surrogate's office: city of New York, Vol. 2, 1708-1728 (New York: The New York Historical Society, 1894), 57, citing liber 7, page 617, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[55] William S. Pelletreau, Abstracts of Wills on file in the Surrogate's office: city of New York, Vol. 2, 1708-1728 (New York: The New York Historical Society, 1894), 154, citing 8 liber 9, page 402, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[56] Charles T Gritman, Historical Miscellany (NY?: 1920?), 1_460, Queens County deeds Liber C, folio 126, QR 525, [AncestryImage].

[57] William S. Pelletreau, Abstracts of Wills on file in the Surrogate's office: city of New York, Vol. 3, 1730-1744 (New York: The New York Historical Society, 1895), 352, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[58] Newspaper, New-York Gazette, or Weekly Post-Boy, published as The New-York Gazette Revived in the Weekly Post-Boy;16 January 1748/49, issue 313, p. 2.

[59] Edward Hicks, Memoirs of the Life and Religious Labors of Edward Hicks (reprint Bedford MA, Applewood Books, 1851), 15, [GoogleBooks].

[60] Bliss Forbush, Elias Hicks, Quaker Liberal (New York, Columbia University Press, 1956), 4, [GoogleBooks].

[61] Leon Clark Hills, History and Genealogy of the Mayflower Planters and First Comers to ye Olde Colonie, Cape Cod Series, Vol. 2 (Kalamazoo, Michigan: Chambers Publishing Company, 1941), [GoogleBooks].

[62] Leon Clark Hills, History and Genealogy of the Mayflower Planters and First Comers to ye Olde Colonie, Cape Cod Series, Vol. 2 (Kalamazoo, Michigan: Chambers Publishing Company, 1941), Person IIIb, [AncestryImage].

[63] Quaker Meetings, Flushing, Long Island, Vol 2031, FHL film 17274, item 1, 34-35, [FHLCatalog].


Citation: Robert and Janet Chevalley Wolfe, Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy, "Notes for Thomas Hicks and Mary Doughty"
Webpage: www.umich.edu/~bobwolfe/gen/mn/m5434x5406.htm
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