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Notes for Ulrich Engel and Anna Brechtbühl

1711 Ulrich Engel, son of Jost Engel and Christina Rohrer, was born in the hamlet (or farm) called Farneren [called Farnern in 2012]. Ulrich Engel was baptized, on March 15, 1711, in the Würzbrunnen Church, Röthenbach, Bern, with witnesses Ulli Blaser, Hans Rohrer, and Barbara Kapfer. [1][Photocopy, 1711 Church record baptism of Ulrich Engel.] [Photocopy, 1711 baptism of Ulrich Engel, detail.][2]

1736 Anna Brächbühl [Brechtbuhl Brechbill Brächbühl Breckbill Brackbill] married Ulrich Engel of Röthenbach [3] on March 4, 1736. They later lived in the Jura, Bern, Switzerland. Ulrich Engel was a Mennonite leader there. Anna was a sponsor at the baptism; at Sombeval, Jura; of Barbara, daughter of Hans Engel, the Anabaptist of Röthenbach.

1745 Ulrich Engle and others had come from the Jura mountains, via Zweibrücken, refugees from the Emmenthal, and all Mennonites. Both Johann and Ulrich Engel had left Röthenbach by 1745. [4][5]

A biosketch reported [6]:

It was the law of the land, that all who immigrated would forfeit to the government what land and coin they may have had. Household goods and other personal property could be retained and taken with them. Ulrich was a man of some means, and it is said he retained some coin, and sewed it in the clothing of his children, and was not detected, and later before sailing must have had opportunity to place the treasure in some chests among other things. The family left Canton of Basel, Switzerland, and sailed from Rotterdam by way of the Cowes, a seaport on the island of Wight, on the ship Phoenix. The ship was commanded by Captain John Spurrier and landed at Philadelphia about October 1, 1754. There were two ships that sailed. One was a freight ship and the other carried the immigrants. When about three days out at sea, a violent storm arose, which grew worse, until the freight ship was in danger of going down. The crew of the vessel began to throw the cargo overboard, and sailing close by, the passengers saw what was being done. A number jumped into the sea and swam to the freight ship and were in the act of crawling over the edge of the ship, whereupon members of the crew chopped off the hands of those making this attempt and they perished. This all came about because it was seen that their cargoes were being cast overboard. They hazarded their lives in the attempt to save their goods. They were maimed by the crew to intimidate those on the passenger ship, which was saved. The freight ship sank. All the infant children died of dysentery at sea except Yokeli Engel. It is said that when the ship arrived at Philadelphia, the families assembled before the final parting, and there was a great lamentation among the others of the children who died at sea. These mothers gathered about Anna Engel, weeping for their lost ones, and said that God had a mission for Anna's child to perform or he would have died. One story says that Ulrich came to friends near Strasburg, PA, by the name of Brechtbill now Brackbill, and remained there for some time. He then came to Wild Cat, which he found swampy and a wilderness. He built a small house near a fine spring, and died in this place from kidney trouble.

1753-54 Ulrich Engle and Anna Brechtbill [Brechtbühl] sailed with their family from Rotterdam, by way of Cowes, on the ship Phoenix under the command of John Spurrier. They arrived in Pennsylvania on 1 October 1754 with "25 Menonists. Swissers. 300 souls, 554 Freights, [from] Franconia, Palatinate, Zweybreck" [7]. Ulrich Engle had a leadership role in this emigration. On board the ship, Ulrich Engle signed his name next to other Mennonites including Benedict Brechtbühl. Ulrich Engel immigrated to Philadelphia, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. [8][9][10][11][12]

1754 After landing at Philadelphia, Ulrich and Anna Engle located west of Marietta near the location of "Wild Cat", a station on the Pennsylvania Railroad. [13][14]

1755 Ulrich Engel sent a letter to relatives in Jura, on December 7, while in Donegal Twp, Lancaster County. [15][16] [Transcription] Story and notes for Ulrich Engle.

1757-61 Ulrich Engel died. A cemetery near Marietta, Lancaster County has an inscription "Within this enclosure lie the remains of Ulrich Engle and wife who emigrated from Switzerland to this country with their family of eight children in the year 1753 and settled on this homestead. Ulrich died about the year 1755 and his wife about the year 1759. Some of their descendants are also buried herein. This burial ground has been set apart as a resting place for them and as a memorial of respect and honor by their descendants A.D. 1878." [17][18]

1761 The heirs of James Logan transferred land, that Ulrich Engel had purchased from James Logan prior to the death of Ulrich Engel, to Anna Engel, Ulrich's widow, and the children, in a deed dated March 26. [19]
[Photocopy, 1761 deed to Engel heirs (first page).] [20]. [Photocopy] 1719 survey map of James Letort tract. [21] [Photocopy] Map of nearby land warrants. [22]

1764 Minor orphans of Ulrick Engle, above the age of 14, chose guardians at the Lancaster Orphans Court: John Engle chose Henry Grove, Barbara Engle chose Christian Forrer, and Christina Engle chose Peter Witmore. [23]

1764 Jacob Couffman made the administrator's account of Ulrich Engel, late of Donegal Twp, Lancaster County, on October 28. "The accountant charges nothing for commission, ... it being advanced by Anna Engel, the widow, who was the other administrator for the benefit of the children, and is now deceased." [24]

1765 Ulrick Engel, administrator for Anna Engel, deceased, produced an account of the estate on October 28. The estate was divided among the heirs: Ulrick (eldest son), Catharine Engle, Anna Engle, John, Engle, Barbara Engle, Christena Engle, and Jacob Engle. [25]

1766 Ulrick Engel, eldest son of Ulrick Engle deceased, late of Donegal Twp, petitioned the Orphans Court, on December 2, upon reaching the age of 21, to consider partition of the land. [26]

1766 The Orphans Court decided that the 150 acre estate should not be divided. Ulrick Engle got the land and paid the other heirs, each receiving £28.14.1: Peter Witmore and wife Catherine, Henry Grove and wife Anna, John Engle, Barbara Engle, Christena Engle, and Jacob Engle. [27]

Research Notes:

A biosketch [28] reports:

For one hundred fifty years the name of Engle has been familiar in the agricultural annals of Lancaster county, and representatives in each generation have held high positions in the religious and official life of the community. The first of the family to come to America was Ulrich Engle, who with his wife and eight children left their native Canton, of Basel, in Switzerland, and sailed from Rotterdam, by way of Cowes in the Isle of Wight, on the good ship “Phoenix,” landing in Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 1, 1754. They made their home at what is now known as "Wild Cat," a station on the Pennsylvania Railroad, west of Marietta. and their remains now lie buried in a small burying ground on a part of their original purchase. Of their children, Ulrich, Jr., wedded Martha Bixler; John married Elizabeth Shock; Jacob married Fanny Shock; Annie married Henry Grove; Christina wedded Jacob Musser; another daughter married Benjamin Musser; and the two remaining children married into the Witmer family.

See also [29][30]


Footnotes:

[1] Kirchenbüch 5, Bern, Röthenbach im Emmental, Evangelisch-Reformierte: Taufrodel (1684-1728), Eherodel (1683-1743), Chorgerichtsmanual (1685-1744), [BernStadtArchiveImage], [BernStadtArchiveCatalog].

[2] John E. Engle and Eugene K Engle, "A Letter from Immigrant Ulrich Engle to Switzerland," Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage 16 (July, 1993), 11-18, at 16, person 156.

[3] John E. Engle and Eugene K Engle, "A Letter from Immigrant Ulrich Engle to Switzerland," Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage 16 (July, 1993), 11-18, at 16.

[4] Henry Frank Eshleman, Historic Background and Annals of the Swiss and German pioneer Settlers of Southeastern Pennsylvania (Lancaster, PA: 1917), 293, [GoogleBooks].

[5] Ira D. Landis, "The Origin of the Brethren in Christ Church and its Later Divisions," The Mennonite Quarterly Review 34 (1960), 298.

[6] Morris M. Engle, The Engle History and Family Records of Dauphin and Lancaster Counties (Mt Joy, Pennsylvania: Bulletin Press, 1927), 17, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[7] Ira D. Landis, "The Origin of the Brethren in Christ Church and its Later Divisions," The Mennonite Quarterly Review 34 (1960), 297.

[8] John B. Linn and William Henry Egle, Pennsylvania Archives, Second Series, Volume 17. (Oath of Allegiance 1727-1775) (1890), 439, right, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks], [InternetArchive].

[9] I. Daniel Rupp, A Collection of Upwards of Thirty Thousand Names of German, Swiss, Dutch, French and other Immigrants in Pennsylvania from 1727 to 1776, 2nd ed. (1875), 336, [GoogleBooks], [HathiTrust].

[10] Ira D. Landis, "The Origin of the Brethren in Christ Church and its Later Divisions," The Mennonite Quarterly Review 34 (1960), 297.

[11] Ralph B. Strassburger, William J. Hinke, ed., Pennsylvania German Pioneers, Vol. 1 (1934, Pennsylvania German Society), 633, [HathiTrust], [InternetArchive].

[12] E. Melvin Williams and H. M. J. Klein, ed., Lancaster County Pennsylvania, a History, Vol. 3 (Lewis Publishing, New York, 1924), 76.

[13] John F. Meginness et al, Biographical Annals of Lancaster County Pennsylvania (Beers: 1903), 296, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[14] E. Melvin Williams and H. M. J. Klein, ed., Lancaster County Pennsylvania, a History, Vol. 3 (Lewis Publishing, New York, 1924), 76.

[15] John E. Engle and Eugene K Engle, "A Letter from Immigrant Ulrich Engle to Switzerland," Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage 16 (July, 1993), 11-18, at 16, translation.

[16] Ira D. Landis, "The Origin of the Brethren in Christ Church and its Later Divisions," The Mennonite Quarterly Review 34 (1960), 298.

[17] A. W. Climenhaga, History of the Brethren in Christ Church (Nappannee, Indiana: 1942), 47.

[18] John E. Engle and Eugene K Engle, "A Letter from Immigrant Ulrich Engle to Switzerland," Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage 16 (July, 1993), 11-18, at 16.

[19] Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Deed L-231, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[20] Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Deed L-231, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[21] Pennsylvania Archives Land Office Survey, D85-253, [PASurveyBookLinks].

[22] Pennsylvania Archives, Township Warrant Map (large download), Lancaster, East Donegal 1, [PATownshipWarrantMaps].

[23] Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Miscellaneous Book 1763-1767, 84, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[24] Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Miscellaneous Book 1763-1767, 84, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[25] Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Miscellaneous Book 1763-1767, 201, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[26] Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Miscellaneous Book 1763-1767, 249, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[27] Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Miscellaneous Book 1763-1767, 258, [FamilySearchImage], [FHLCatalog].

[28] John F. Meginness et al, Biographical Annals of Lancaster County Pennsylvania (Beers: 1903), 295, [HathiTrust], [GoogleBooks].

[29] Richard Warren Davis, Mennosearch.com, Engel A4156.

[30] Richard Warren Davis, Mennosearch.com, Brächbühl C.35.


Citation: Robert and Janet Chevalley Wolfe, Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy, "Notes for Ulrich Engel and Anna Brechtbühl"
Webpage: www.umich.edu/~bobwolfe/gen/mn/m4846x4853.htm
Email address: JanetRobertWolfeGenealogy@gmail.com
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