Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy --- Go to Genealogy Page for Robert Murfin --- Go to Genealogy Page for Ann Lee

Notes for Robert Murfin and Ann Lee

1674 Robert Murfin (perhaps this Robert, or his father) appeared in the Nottinghamshire Hearth Tax list: 1674, under the heading Bassetlaw Hundred, Hatfeild [sic] Division, Worksopp, Braisbridge parish, with two hearths. Bracebridge is now a street name in the town of Workshop, Nottinghamshire, near the Workshop Abbey.

1674 Robert Murfin and Ann Lee were married at Birke's House, Scaftworth, Nottinghamshire, England.

1674 "Robert Murfin and Ann his wife, living in Nottinghamshire, England, had one daughter born there in the year 1674, the 4th of the 2d month, named Mary, (the writer of this account, who married the first Daniel Smith of Burlington.) After that, they had a son called Robert." [1][2]

"Some time after it came in their minds to move themselves and family into West Jersey in America and in order thereto they went to Hull and provided provisions suitable for their necessary occasions such as fine flour butter cheese with other suitable commodities in good store" [3][4]

1677 Robert Murfin purchased land of George Hutchinson for £6.15. [5]

1678 [They] "then took their passage in the good ship the Shield of Stockton with Mahlon Stacy, Thomas Lambert, and many more families of good repute and and worth; and in the voyage there were two died and two born; so that they landed as many as they took on board. And after about sixteen weeks sailing or on board, they arrived at Burlington in the year 1678; this being the first ship that ever was known to come so high up the Delaware river. Then they landed and made some such dwellings as they could for the present time; some in caves, and others in palisade houses secured. With that, the Indians, very numerous, but very civil, for the most part, brought com and venison, and sold the English for such things as they needed; so that the said English had some new supply to help their old stock, which may well be attributed to the good hand of Providence, so to preserve and provide in such a wilderness." [6][7][8][9][10]

1678 Robert Murfin arrived at Burlington, New Jersey in November from Eaton, Nottingham, England with wife and 2 children on the "Shield of Stockton" after a 16 week trip. They settled in Chesterfield, near Burlington, in the woods. This was the only town in West Jersey except New Salem in Fenwick's Colony. [11]

"These valiant subjects, both to God and their king, did buy their land in old England before they entered (upon this engagement) and after all this, did submit themselves to mean living, taking it with thankfulness, mean and coarse; as pounding Indian com one day for the next day; for there was no mill, except some few steed mills, and (we) thought so well of this kind of hard living that I never heard them say, 'I would I had never come!' which is worth observing, considering how plentifully lived in England." [12][13]

"Robert Murfin and his wife: after they came into this land, they had one son called John; and in the year 1681, they had another son called William; and in the year 1684 they had a daughter called Johanah. Robert and John died young [14][15]. The names of their children, with birth dates were recorded in Quaker meeting records of Chesterfield Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey [16]

1680 The area in New Jersey where Robert Murfin, of Haines Greave, and his wife Ann Lee, of Worksop, lived became known as Nottingham. [17]

1680 On 16 March, Robert Murfin, planter of Crosswick Creek, West NJ, purchased 100 acres of Anthony Woodhouse, planter of Mansfield, New Jersey for 7 pounds. [18]

1680 On June 14, Robert Murfin [Mirfin] was named as a freeholder in the County of Burlington. [19]

1680 Robert Murfin registered an earmark for his swine in the County of Burlington. [20]

1680 On 12 November. Return of survey for Robert Murfin, of 8 a. 40 perches of meadow, between William Wood and the Delaware River. [21] On the same day, William Black purchased land adjoining. An agreement was reached between Robert Murfin and Wm. Black, that the lane dividing their resp. lands shall be forever a common highway. [22]

1681 May 10. Return of survey for Robert Murfin (or his son?), of 100 acres, S. W. Crosswick Cr., adjoining John Murfin. [23]

1682 John Hooton sold a lot in Burlington to Robert Murfin for 13 pounds. Witnessed by John Rogers, William Lasswell, and Thomas Revell. [24]

1683 Robert Murfin was chosen by the Burlington Court as constable of Burlington County, New Jersey and as commissioner for buying Indian land above the Falls. [25]

1684 Robert Murfin witnessed the marriage of Samuel Bunting and Mary Foulkes. [26][27]

1684 Robert Murfin and William Black reported the need for an arbitrator [in a dispute]. Robert Wilson was appointed arbitrator and the dispute was settled to the satisfaction of both parties. [28]

1684 On July 16, William Black and Robert Murfin conveyed to John Horner, late of Burlington, Yeoman, and Mary his wife, two plantations in Mansfield township, two hundred acres lying above Crosswicks Creek. [29]

1684 Robert and John Murfin were on the assessment list for Burlington County, New Jersey as owning 300 acres undivided and 100 acres certain. [30][31]

1685 Robert Murfin was selected again as constable. [32]

1684 On 18'th day of 9'th month, Samuel Bunting and Mary Foulke, daughter of Thomas ffoulke, both of Chesterfield, were married at the house of Francis Davenport. The wedding was witnessed by Robert Murfin and others [33].

1687 Robert Murfin and Francis Davenport were selected by the Chesterfield Friends meeting to investigate that that Mr Watson was unencumbered for marriage to widow Bridget Bingham. [34]

1688 Robert Murfin was selected as assessor for the bridge over Darriom in Nottingham. [35][36]

1689 John Murfin (possibly the son of Robert and Ann), basholer (bachelor?) of Bartar Creek, sold a lot in Burlington to Gervas Pharo, basholer of Nottingham Woodhouse, West Jersey. [37]

1690 The Quaker meeting rotated among the homes of Francis Davenport in Chesterfield, Edward Rockhill in Chesterfield, Thomas Lambert at Nottingham, Robert Murfin at Nottingham, William Biddle at Chesterfield, and Mahlon Stacy at the Falls. [38][39]

1690 Robert Murfin, yeoman, perhaps this one, was bondsman for the will of William Beard of Mansfield Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey. [40]

1692 On 20 November, Thomas and Mary Coleman, tailor of Bucks County, Pennsylvania sold 100 acres on Crosswicks Creek to Robert Murfin, yeoman of Burlington, for 18 pounds...devised by John Wood for his daughter Mary (Coleman), late of Creekhouse, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. [41][42]

1692 Robert Murfin was listed as a resident of Nottingham, Burlington County. [43]

1694 On May 8, Robert Murfin, of Nottingham Parish, Burlington County, New Jersey, perhaps this one but more likely his son, dated his will. Inventory of the estate of (£213.19.6, all personal); made by Thomas Lambert, Mahlon Stacy, Francis Davenport and William Watson. [44]

1694 On 4 of month 3 [May], Robert Murfin died and his death was recorded in the Chesterfield monthly meeting records. [45][46]

1694 On 17 September, Letters of administration on the estate of Robert Murfin of Nottingham, were granted to widow, Anne Murfin and she made bond and filed the inventory. [47][48][49]

1694 On 17 September, Bond of Ann Murfin, widow of Robert, as administratrix. Francis Davenport and John Murfin, both of said county, yeomen, fellow bondsmen. [50]

1695 On 1 month [March], day 25, Ann Murfin was listed among the residents of Nottingham Twp, Burlington County. [51]

1697 The Nottingham Town town meeting was held at the house of Ann Murfin. [52]

1698 John Murfin, perhaps the brother of Robert Murfin, husbandman of Crosswicks, transferred 260 acres to sister-in-law widow Ann Murfin. Speculation: This could be a transfer of inherited land to the widow of Robert Murfin. [53]

1698 On April 29, Ann Murfin, of Nottingham, Burlington County, widow, perhaps this Robert Murfin's widow, dated her will. Children: William, Mary Smith, Johanna (under age). Real and personal estate. Executors: son William, brother John Murfin and son-in-law Daniel Smith. Witnesses: Joseph Smith, William Murfin and Francis Davenport. Codicill of June 21, 1701, disposes of 206 acres lately bought of brother John Morfin. Witnesses: Francis Davenport, Rebecca Davenport and Hannah Ouenton (?). Proved June 25, 1701. [54]

1701 June 24, Inventory of the estate of Ann Murfin (£312.3.-, all personal); made by Robart Wilson, Thomas Gilberthorpe, Samuel Bunting and John Bunting. [55]

1701 Bond, June 25, of the executors, named in the will, William Murfin not signing. Henry Grubb and Joseph Smith, fellow bondsmen.

The following quote is from an original autograph of Mrs. Mary Smith, a Friend who arrived in America at age 4.
"Robert Murfin and Ann, his wife, living in Nottinghamshire, England, had one daughter born there in the year 1674, the 4th of the 2nd month, named Mary (the writer of this account, who married the first Daniel Smith of;Burlington). After that they had a son called Robert.

Some time after it came into their minds to move themselves and family into West Jersey in America; and in order thereto they went to Hull and provided provisions for their necessary occasions, such as fine flour, butter, cheese, with other suitable commodities in good state; then took their passage in the good ship, the "Shield", of Stockton, with Mahlon Stacy, Thomas Lambert, and many more families of good repute and worth; and in the voyage there were two died and two born, so they landed as many as they took on board. And after about sixteen weeks' sailing, or on board, they arrived at Burlington in the year 1678, this being the first ship that ever was known to come so high up the Delaware river. Then they landed and made some such dwellings as they could for the present time, some in caves and others in palisade houses secured. With that the Indians, very numerous but very civil, for the most part brought corn and venison and sold the English for such things as they needed, so that the English had some new supply to help their old stock, which may well be attributed to the good hand of Providence so to preserve and provide in such a wilderness.

I may not omit some English that came the year before, which landed lower down the river and were gotten to Burlington, who came in some small vessels up to Burlington before us, and was so concented to by the Indians.

The first comers, with the others that came near that time, made an agreement with the Indians for their land, being after this manner: From the river to such and such creeks, and was to be paid in goods after this manner, say, so many match-coats, guns, hatchets, hoes, kettles- two full boxes- with other materials, all in number as agreed upon by both Indians and English. When these goods were gotten from England and the Indians paid, then the above mentioned people surrendered some part of their land to settle themselves near the river, for they did not dare to go far from it at first.

I must not forget that these valiant subjects both to God and their king, did buy their land in old England before they entered (upon this engagement), and after all this did submit themselves to mean living, taking it with thankfulness, mean and coarse, as pounding Indian corn one day for the next day, for there was no mill, except some few steedmills, and (we) thought so well of this kind of hard living that I never heard them say "I would I had never come" which is worth observing, considering how plentifuly they lived in England. It seems no other than the hand of God to send them to prepare a place for the future generations. I wish they that come after may consider these things, and not be like the children of Israel after they were settled in the land of Canaan, forgetting the God of their fathers and following their own vanities, and so bring displeasure instead of the blessings of God upon themselves, which fall and loss will be very great on all such.

It may be observed how God's providence made room for us in a wonderful manner in taking away the Indians. There came a distemper (smallpox, this is described in more detail in the footnote in the source) among them so mortal that they could not bury all the dead. Others went away leaving their town. It was said that an old Indian king spoke prophetically before his death, and said, "the English should increase, and the Indians decrease". [56] Note: Mary Smith was found drowned with her horse in 1739, near the Long Bridge, in Northern Liberties, Philadelphia, - supposed to have occurred while watering her horse; that was then the direct and only "road to Burlington".

"Mary Smith was the daughter of Robert Murfin and Anne his wife, and was born at Eaton...in the year 1674 [Friends' register gives date 26 April 1675, Hanes Green, Co. of Notts.] Her father...removed to America in 1678, leaving Hull in a vessel, called the 'Shield of Stockton,' about the close of the Sixth month [August], and arriving opposite Burlington, in the tenth month [December], after a passage of 16 weeks." The article then quotes Mary Murfin Smith: "There came two ships from Europe, with passengers [in 1677. In one of them came several men appointed for commissioners to buy the land of the Indians, not only for themselves, but in behalf of others which had bought land in England, to be taken up in West Jersey. Their names followeth: Thomas Olive, Daniel Wills, Thomas Fouk, William Emley, John Penford, Robert Stacey, Joseph Emsley, Benjamin Scott. In the other ship came John Murfin, William Wood, and many others. 
"In the year 1677, Robert Murfin, son of Robert Murfin, of the town of Eaton, in Nottinghamshire, Old England, bought a share of a propriety of land, to be taken up in West Jersey, in America. In 1678, he, with his wife, two children and two sisters, Ann Farrow, her husband and son, and Katharine Murfin, with several others, as Thomas Lambert, Mahlon Stacey, took their passage in a good ship, called the Shield, Daniel Gooses, master, for the voyage. They sailed from a seaport town, called Hull, and in the tenth month,they arrived at the island, now called Burlington. They had two children born, and two passengers died on the voyage...." "The land on which Robert Murfin settled with his family, was at Crosswicks..." [57][58]

Footnotes:

[1] John Warner Barber and Henry Howe, "History and Antiquities with Geographic Descriptions of Every Township," Historical Collections of the State of New Jersey (New York: S Tuttle, 1846), 90, [Internet Archive].

[2] Barclay White. "Early Settlements in Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey," Proceedings, Constitution, By-Laws, List of Members, &c. of the Surveyors' Association of West New Jersey (1880), 74, [Internet Archive].

[3] John Warner Barber and Henry Howe, "History and Antiquities with Geographic Descriptions of Every Township," Historical Collections of the State of New Jersey (New York: S Tuttle, 1846), 90, [Internet Archive].

[4] Barclay White. "Early Settlements in Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey," Proceedings, Constitution, By-Laws, List of Members, &c. of the Surveyors' Association of West New Jersey (1880), 74, [Internet Archive].

[5] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 1, [FHL_Book].

[6] John Warner Barber and Henry Howe, "History and Antiquities with Geographic Descriptions of Every Township," Historical Collections of the State of New Jersey (New York: S Tuttle, 1846), 90, [Internet Archive].

[7] Barclay White. "Early Settlements in Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey," Proceedings, Constitution, By-Laws, List of Members, &c. of the Surveyors' Association of West New Jersey (1880), 74, [Internet Archive].

[8] Robert Proud, The History of Pennsylvania, in North America, Vol. 1 (Philadelphia: Zachariah Poulson, 1797), 150, [Google Book].

[9] George De Cou, Burlington: A Provincial Capital (1945), 35, [Google Book].

[10] Thomas Francis Gordon, The History of New Jersey from its Discovery by Europeans (1834), 335, [Google Book].

[11] Samuel Smith, The History of the Colony of Nova-Caesaria or New Jersey (1890), 109, [Internet Archive].

[12] John Warner Barber and Henry Howe, "History and Antiquities with Geographic Descriptions of Every Township," Historical Collections of the State of New Jersey (New York: S Tuttle, 1846), 90, [Internet Archive].

[13] Barclay White. "Early Settlements in Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey," Proceedings, Constitution, By-Laws, List of Members, &c. of the Surveyors' Association of West New Jersey (1880), 75, [Internet Archive].

[14] John Warner Barber and Henry Howe, "History and Antiquities with Geographic Descriptions of Every Township," Historical Collections of the State of New Jersey (New York: S Tuttle, 1846), 90, [Internet Archive].

[15] Barclay White. "Early Settlements in Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey," Proceedings, Constitution, By-Laws, List of Members, &c. of the Surveyors' Association of West New Jersey (1880), 75, [Internet Archive].

[16] Charlotte D. Meldrum, Early Church Records of Burlington County, New Jersey, Vol. 2 (1995), 27.

[17] Robert and Catherine Barnes, indexers, Genealogies of Pennsylvania Families from the Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 3 (1982) 224.

[18] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 64, [FHL_Book].

[19] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. 2 (1906), 1, [HathiTrust], [Internet Archive].

[20] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. 2 (1906), 3, [HathiTrust], [Internet Archive].

[21] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 347, citing Revel's book of surveys, 10, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[22] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 347, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[23] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 349, citing Daniel Leed's surveys in Revel's book of surveys, 15, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[24] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 3, 6, [FHL_Book].

[25] Francis Bazley Lee, ed., Genealogical and Personal Memorial of Mercer County, New Jersey, Vol. 1 (1907), 7, [Google Book].

[26] Hamilton Schuyler, "Chapter 8: Churches and Religious Institutions," A History of Trenton, 1679-1929: Two Hundred and Fifty Years of a Notable Town with Links in Four Centuries (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1929), [Trenton_Historical_Society].

[27] USGenWeb Archives, [USGenWeb].

[28] Hamilton Schuyler, "Chapter 8: Churches and Religious Institutions," A History of Trenton, 1679-1929: Two Hundred and Fifty Years of a Notable Town with Links in Four Centuries (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1929), [Trenton_Historical_Society].

[29] John W. Jordan, Colonial Families of Philadelphia, Vol. 1 (New York: Lewis Publishing Company, 1911), 659, [Internet Archive].

[30] H. Clay Reed and George J. Miller, The Burlington Court Book. A Record of Quaker Jurisprudence in West New Jersey 1680-1709, Vol. 5 (1944), 32.

[31] John J. Thompson, "A Burlington County, New Jersey Assessment List, 1684," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 15 (1891), 346-349, at 348, [HathiTrust].

[32] Francis Bazley Lee, ed., Genealogical and Personal Memorial of Mercer County, New Jersey, Vol. 1 (1907), 7, [Google Book].

[33] Chesterfield meeting records, image 23, [Ancestry_Image].

[34] Robert and Catherine Barnes, indexers, Genealogies of Pennsylvania Families from the Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 3 (1982) 224.

[35] Francis Bazley Lee, History of Trenton, New Jersey, the record of its early settlement and corporate progress (1895), 19, [Google Book].

[36] Francis Bazley Lee, ed., Genealogical and Personal Memorial of Mercer County, New Jersey, Vol. 1 (1907), 7, [Google Book].

[37] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 57, [FHL_Book].

[38] Hamilton Schuyler, "Chapter 8: Churches and Religious Institutions," A History of Trenton, 1679-1929: Two Hundred and Fifty Years of a Notable Town with Links in Four Centuries (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1929), [Trenton_Historical_Society].

[39] Edwin Robert Walker, Clayton L. Traver, A History of Trenton, 1679-1929, two hundred and fifty years of a notable town with links in four centuries, Vol. 1 (Princeton, 1929), [Google Book], [Google Book].

[40] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 31, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[41] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 63, [FHL_Book].

[42] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 451, citing West Jersey Records, Liber B, Part 2, p 402, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[43] Trenton Historical Society, Nottingham Township, New Jersey Minute Book 1692-1710; 1752-1772 (1940), 1, [World_Cat], [Google Book], [FHL_Film_Catalog].

[44] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 334, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[45] Chesterfield Monthly meeting records, Minutes, 1682-1847, image 52, [Ancestry_Image].

[46] Chesterfield Meeting, page 26, image 16, [Ancestry_Image].

[47] H. Clay Reed and George J. Miller, The Burlington Court Book. A Record of Quaker Jurisprudence in West New Jersey 1680-1709, Vol. 5 (1944), 22.

[48] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 334, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[49] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. 2 (1906), 21, [HathiTrust], [Internet Archive].

[50] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 334, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[51] Trenton Historical Society, Nottingham Township, New Jersey Minute Book 1692-1710; 1752-1772 (1940), 3, [World_Cat], [Google Book], [FHL_Film_Catalog].

[52] Trenton Historical Society, Nottingham Township, New Jersey Minute Book 1692-1710; 1752-1772 (1940), 6, [World_Cat], [Google Book], [FHL_Film_Catalog].

[53] John David Davis, West Jersey New Jersey Deed records 1676-1721 (2005), 157, [FHL_Book].

[54] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 333, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[55] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 333, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[56] Major E. M. Woodward and John Hageman, History of Burlington and Mercer Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1883), 11, [HathiTrust].

[57] The Friend, A Religious and Literary Journal 30 (1857), 229, see the biography of Mary (Murfin) Smith, [Internet Archive].

[58] Barclay White. "Early Settlements in Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey," Proceedings, Constitution, By-Laws, List of Members, &c. of the Surveyors' Association of West New Jersey (1880), 74, of 74-76, [Internet Archive].


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