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Notes for Abiah Brown and Margaret Sharp

1743 On 28 of month 9, Abiah Brown, son of Preserve Brown Jr and Mary (nee French) Brown, was born. [1][2]

1756 On 12th of 8th month, John Jones Jr. and Mary Brown, daughter of Preserve Brown and Mary (French), were married at Chesterfield. Witnessed by Abia Brown, and others. [3]

1756 On 11th, 11th month, Joseph Schooley and Sarah Brown, daughter of Preserve Brown, were married at the Chesterfield Quaker Monthly Meeting. Witnessed by Abia Brown and others. [4][5][6]

1759 Abia Brown was named in the will of Preserve Brown, his father. [7]

1765 On 12 March, Abia Brown of Burlington and Margaret Sharp of Salem were married [8][9].

1766 Abiah Brown and Joseph Clayton advertised for the return of a Mulettoe servant man runaway from Brown's Mills of Nottingham Twp, Burlington County, West New Jersey, with a 3 pound reward. [10]

1767 On 19 March, Abia Brown, Joseph Schooley's brother-in-law, advertised in the Pennsylvania Gazette to sell 100 acres with a mill along the river from Trenton to Crosswicks. Interested parties were to apply to Joseph Schooley, living near the same premises. The advertisement states: "To be sold by purchaser. A valuable grist mill, with two pairs of stones, and a turning lathe, hoisting all by water, with a good two story dwelling house, 4 rooms on a floor, a cellar under the whole with two kitchens and a well of good water at the door; a good barn, stables, store-house at the same, sufficient to contain 300 barrels of flour, where a shallop may load at the door, that can carry 200 barrels of flour; also a small dwelling house for the miller, and springhouse, and cooper's shop, with about 100 acres of land, one half of the same meadow and the remainder fit for plough and in fence, it is pleasantly situated on the great road that leads from Trenton to Crosswicks and Allen-town, and on the road that leads from Princeton to the above landing, on a constant stream of water, the whole in good repair, and in a public place for the business of keeping store, where there may be plenty of wheat had, it being two miles from Crosswicks, six from Trenton, twelve from Princeton, six from Allentown, and three from Bordentown. Any person inclining to purchase the same may apply to Joseph Scholey, living near the said premises, or subscriber living in Sharp's Iron Works, in Sussex County, New Jersey N.B. There is a good young bearing apple orchard on the premises. The title is indisputable." [11][12]

1767 On 21 September, the grist mill, six miles from Trenton, was advertised to be sold by Abia Brown at public vendue. Apply to Joseph Schooley. [13]

1768 Abiah Brown inherited from his father an extensive mill property in Nottingham Twp, Burlington County, New Jersey, which he sold in 1768 to Robert Lewis of Philadelphia for 1,000 pounds. In this deed of transfer, he was referred to as "Ironmaster". [14]

1771 Abia Brown offered for sale a one-third interest in the Sharpsburg Furnace, consisting of three fires. Abia, son of Preserve Brown, was the son-in-law of Joseph Sharp, having married the latter's daughter Margaret on March 12, 1765. He was at that time of Salem, but the next year he was operating a sawmill in Burlington County [15]

1772 Abia Brown was appointed as a justice of the peace in Sussex County in 1772 by the New Jersey governor and was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1774. [16]

1774 On 16 July, Abia Brown was named to a committee in Sussex County to "render true and faithful allegiance to George the Third" ... "to be taxed only by our own consent" ... "not to use any articles imported from Great Britain or the East Indies" ... "to represent this province in a general congress of deputies" [17][18][19]

1774 On 23 July, Abia Brown met with others at New Brunswick to appoint representatives to a General Congress. [20]

1774 On 5 September, at the meeting of deputies in New Brunswick, Abia Brown was selected as a delegate representing New Jersey, for the General Congress. [21]

1775 On 26 January, Abia Brown and Joseph Sharpe advertised the sale of an iron works: “To be leased. For a term of years, and entered on this spring, on a reasonable rent, the iron-works, known by the name of Sharpsborough Iron-works, situated in the county of Sussex, and province of East New-Jersey, on a stream, called the Walkill. The works consists of a furnace, with castings, bridge-houses, and all other houses necessary ; one forge near said furnace, and a saw-mill ; the forge has three fires, and two hammers; one other forge about a mile from the furnace, consisting of two fires and one hammer, with a good stone coalhouse, dwelling-house, and other houses necessary. Also the halfpart of a valuable grist-mill, with one pair of stones, over-shot, on a never-failing stream of water, and just new repaired. Likewise between four and five thousand acres of land, on which are five good farms improved, with one hundred acres of good English meadow, in good fence ; it produces hay sufficient to keep all the teams necessary for the use of the works and farms. There are on said tracts, within two miles of the furnace, 300 acres of good ash swamp; there is also on the premises a sufficient quantity of timber, within 3 miles of the furnace, to supply the works for a number of years longer than the above lease, and an inexhaustible fund of excellent iron-ore (easily raised) within a mile of the furnace. The whole is situated in a plentiful part of the country for produce, and a good part for trade. Any person inclining to rent the above may know the terms by applying to Joseph Sharp, living in Salem county, West-Jersey, or the subscriber, living on the premises. January 26, 1775- Abia Brown. N. B.—The above Works have been erected six years. [22]

1775 In October, Abia Brown of Sussex was a deputy at the Provincial Congress of New Jersey held at Trenton. [23][24]

1776 In January, Abijah Brown of Sussex County was a deputy at the Provincial Congress of New Jersey held at New Brunswick. [25]

1776 In May, Sussex County, New Jersey, was represented in the new Republican Assembly of New Jersey, by Casper Shafer, Abia Brown, and Thomas Peterson [26]. Abia Brown and others opposed the deportation of Governor Franklin at the Assembly [27]

1777 "The [iron] works were operated during the Revolution, making war materials, and at the fifth meeting of the first session of the Legislature in 1777, on petition of Abia Brown, 'Partner and Conductor' of the Sharpsborough Works, twelve men were exempted from military duty so long as they were employed in the said works." [28]

1780 On 29 May, Isaac Sharp, of Manington, Salem County, dated his will. Wife, Mary, the profits of my real and personal estate till my children come of age. Daughter, Meriam, the plantation in the upper part of the Neck, joining lands of Davis Bassett and James Woodnut, except 10 acres of woodland on the upper part, which I give to my son, instead of 10 acres on Manington, opposite to Preston Carpenter's old landing. If my said daughter die, then I give the said plantation to my sister's son. Sharp Brown. My only son, Isaac, all my plantation where I live, except the 10 acres of meadow; also my share of the ironworks and lands thereto belonging, which my father gave me by deed dated Sept. 1st, 1770; also 30 acres on Pompton Mountain, called the Mineland; but, if he die under age, then the plantation I give to my sister's son, Joseph Brown. If my son and daughter both die, then the Propriety Rights to go to my sister's daughters, Mary, Rebecca and Margaret Brown. Executors—wife, Mary, and my cousin, Anthony Sharp, and they are to fulfil the will of my father, Joseph Sharp, deceased, in paying Vs part of the expence yearly for the support of my afflicted sister, Mary Sharp, during her life. Witnesses—Thomas Allen, William Hammitt, Josiah Miller. Proved Oct. 12, 1780. [29]

1808 On 29 February, Sharp Brown [signed by his mark], of Nottingham, Burlington County, laborer; dated his will. Whereas Isaac Sharp, late of Manington in Salem County, by will dated May 29, 1780 gave to his daughter Miriam, a plantation in Hains Neck (Salem County); also 10 acres of meadow and in case of her death, to his sister's son, Sharp Brown; also said Isaac gave to his son, 30 acres on Pompton Mountain, called the Mine land; but in case of his death under age, the same together with the cedar swamp in Pittsgrove to aforesaid Sharp Brown and to his brother, Joseph Brown; and whereas said Miriam Sharp and Isaac Sharp both died before full age and said Joseph Brown is also dead, I am undoubted heir to aforesaid lands. Therefore I give the said lands to Joseph Schooley (son of James, of Nottingham); also my personal estate on condition that he pay to Abia Thorne (son of Isaac, of Burlington County), $400. Executor - friend, James Hughes. Witnesses - Lewis Evans, Samuel Evans, James Ewing, Esq. Proved Nov. 5, 1811. [30]

Research Notes:

Birthdates of children are from Texas Society Daughters of the American Revolution Roster Book 2-D-H and 1-A-C.

It may be difficult to distinguish between this Abiah Brown and his nephew Abiah, son of brother Willliam, in some records:

Abia Brown, son of Preserve Brown, married Margaret Munro [31]. We suspect this is an error, confusing two different men named Abia Brown.

Footnotes:

[1] Chesterfield monthly meeting, image 36, [Ancestry_Image].

[2] Chesterfield Quaker meeting, image 87, [Ancestry_Image].

[3] Chesterfield Quaker meeting, image 93, [Ancestry_Image].

[4] Chesterfield Quaker meeting, image 93, [Ancestry_Image].

[5] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 223.

[6] May Schooley Ivey, A Pioneer Schooley Family (1941), 21, 24.

[7] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 32. (Wills and Administrations 3, 1751-1760) (1924), 44, citing Lib. 10, p. 209, [Internet Archive].

[8] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 22. (Marriage Records, 1665-1800) (1900), 34, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[9] Charles Shimer Boyer, Early forges & furnaces in New Jersey (1931), 193, footnote 3, [HathiTrust], [Google Book].

[10] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 25. (Newspapers 6, 1766-1767) (1903), 2, of 2-3, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[11] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 25. (Newspapers 6, 1766-1767) (1903), 320, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[12] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 25. (Newspapers 6, 1766-1767) (1903), 444, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[13] Francis Bazley Lee, ed., Genealogical and Personal Memorial of Mercer County, New Jersey, Vol. 1 (1907), 27, [Google Book].

[14] Howard Barclay French, Genealogy of the Descendants of Thomas French, Volume 1 (1909), 208, [Internet Archive].

[15] Charles Shimer Boyer, Early forges & furnaces in New Jersey (1931), 193, footnote 3, [HathiTrust], [Google Book].

[16] James B. Schooley. Trails of Our Fathers, revised (1988), 222, undocumented.

[17] Minutes of the Provincial Congress and the Council of Safety of the State of New Jersey [1775-1776](Trenton: 1879), 19, [Internet Archive].

[18] James P. Snell, History of Sussex and Warren Counties, New Jersey (1881), 50, of 49-50, left column, item 7, [Internet Archive].

[19] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 31. (Newspapers 11, 1775) (1923), 429, [Google Book].

[20] James P. Snell, History of Sussex and Warren Counties, New Jersey (1881), 50, [Internet Archive].

[21] Minutes of the Provincial Congress and the Council of Safety of the State of New Jersey [1775-1776](Trenton: 1879), 31, [Internet Archive].

[22] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 31. (Newspapers 11, 1775) (1923), 512, [Google Book].

[23] Minutes of the Provincial Congress and the Council of Safety of the State of New Jersey [1775-1776](Trenton: 1879), 197, 199, [Internet Archive].

[24] Thomas Francis Gordon, The History of New Jersey from its Discovery by Europeans (1834), 339, [Google Book].

[25] Minutes of the Provincial Congress and the Council of Safety of the State of New Jersey [1775-1776](Trenton: 1879), 325, [Internet Archive].

[26] Benjamin Bailey Edsall, Joseph Farrand Tuttle, The First Sussex Centennary [sic] Containing the Addresses of Benj. B. Edsall, Esq., and Rev. J. F. Tuttle (Newark: 1853), 26, bottom of page, [Google Book].

[27] Charles Shimer Boyer, Early forges & furnaces in New Jersey (1931), 84, [HathiTrust], [Google Book].

[28] Charles Shimer Boyer, Early forges & furnaces in New Jersey (1931), 194, [HathiTrust], [Google Book].

[29] A. Van Doren Honeyman, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 34. (Wills and Administrations 5, 1771-1780) (1931), 454, citing Lib. 23, p. 382, [Internet Archive].

[30] Elmer T. Hutchinson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 41. (Calendar of New Jersey Wills 12, 1810-1813) (1949), 52, citing File 12493 C, [Google Book].

[31] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. 3 (1914), 133, [Internet Archive].


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