Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy --- Go to Genealogy Page for William Hutchinson --- Go to Genealogy Page for Ann Simpson

Notes for William Hutchinson and Ann Simpson

Oral Traditions and Anecdotes are mixed with documentation in these notes:

Oral tradition reports that William Hutchinson came from England with a brother. [1][2]

1699 On 17 March, Ann Simpson was born. [3][4][5]

William Hutchinson and wife Ann Simpson lived in Middlesex County and Monmouth County, New Jersey, in the early 1700s.

1737 In September 24, William Hutchinson and (brother) Jonathan bought land on the southern side of the Assanpink and on both sides of the Province line as run by George Keith from the heirs of David Lyell, deceased. Charles Robbins Hutchinson states that the tract of land was lying on the southerly side of the Assanpink Creek and on both side of the province line as run by George Keith, containing 756 acres, and upon which they settled. This land was in what is today the southern part of West Windsor Township, Mercer County. He also states that the Lyells were Perth Amboy people and it is likely that both Jonathan and William also came from that locality and that they were brothers. [It is also known that the John Hutchinson, who married Elizabeth Pearson in 1730, was also from Perth Amboy, New Jersey.] [6]

1737 Sarah Moore appeared before the Middlesex County Court on 29 March 1737 before Judge Joseph McChesney, and gave the family record in an affidavit as it appeared in the family Bible which was handed down thru the family to her. It said that William Hutchinson was born 12 June 1697\8. The notes of Charles Robbins Hutchinson state that William was born in England and came to this country early in life. A great-grandson also states this but adds, in a letter to a newspaper, that William was accompanied by a brother. William was a Justice of the Peace for the King of England in Middlesex County. [7]

1740 On August 28, James Alexander and Daniel Donaldson Dunstar, absentee landowners, conveyed to William Hutchinson, for 488.11.5 pounds, a tract of land in what was then in Windsor Township, Middlesex County and is today East Windsor Township, Mercer County, bounded east and north by Rocky Brook, including the present village of Etra, then called Milford, extending southward to about where is now the Monmouth County line and westwardly about one and a half miles; containing 1,037 acres. Its southwesterly corner appears to have been about where Lawrence's Line between East and West Jersey crosses said county line. William Hutchinson moved to this land, and some portion of it still remains in the possession of his descendants. [8] Website East Windsor Township

1746 William Hutchinson was appointed to a new Commission of the Peace for the county of Middlesex by John Hamilton, president of his Majesty's council and commander in chief of the Province of New Jersey. The commission was to raise volunteers, perhaps for an expedition with New York against Canada. [9]

1747 William Hutchinson signed an affidavit concerning a speech in favor of the rioters that attacked the jail at Amboy. [10]

1749 "At a council held at Burlington on the 28th day of March, 1749. His Excellency by and with the advice of this Board appointed the following officers in the several counties, viz: For the county of Middlesex , William Hutchinson, one of the Justices of the Quorum. [11][12]

1754 On 1 August, William Hutchinson purchased part of the Earl of Perth's patent near land of Dr. Johnston and Rocky Brook. Several parties were involved, because prior surveys had been in error. [13]

1758 William Hutchinson Esquire of Windsor Twp, Middlesex Co, East NJ sold to John Tindall for 150 pounds, two lots, which William and his brother Jonathan had purchased previously. The land adjoined land of Jonathan Hutchinson and Thomas Tindall. One tract was on the Assanpink creek adjacent to John Roger Jr land. Witnesses James English, George Danser and Thomas Tindall. [14]

1763 William Hutchinson co-signed a bond, appointing and obligating James Brooks [James Brooks married William and Ann's daughter, Anne Hutchinson] to serve as Sheriff of Middlesex Co, in Jan 1763 Term of the Middlesex County Court. James Brooks did not complete his obligation to be sheriff, so the bond became forfeit and William Hutchinson was obligated to the King. This obligation resulted in a lawsuit in 1771 against William's estate. [15]
Photocopy, 1795 New Jersey Supreme Court record (page 153)
Photocopy, 1795 New Jersey Supreme Court record (page 154)
Photocopy, 1795 New Jersey Supreme Court record (cover)

1763 In the October Term 1763 of the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace, both William Hutchinson and Jonathan Hutchinson were listed among several of Middlesex County residents called as members of the Grand Jury. William was present in the morning but Jonathan and several others were not. The court recessed until 2:00PM, at which time Jonathan and others appeared, after paying their fines of 20 shillings. Both Jonathan and William were present for the afternoon session.

1767 On 8 September 1767, William signed a petition, as one of 13 others, for Thomas Height to maintain a "Publick house & Tavern Situate on the high road in the Said Windsor ..." (Signing with him were two other Hutchinsons; sons John and Joseph.)

1769 On Mar 11, 1769, William Hutchinson, being of New Windsor, conveyed to his son, William, in a Middlesex County deed, found in the minutes of the Middlesex County Court of Common Pleas (1764-1771), for the January Term of 1771. There is the docket of "John Martin", who charged the "Adn [Adminstrator ?] of Wm. Hutchison" a debt of £93.15.8. This docket and other writs in the Common Pleas Court of Middlesex Co were likely related to a 1763 obligation and a 1771 suit against the administrator of William Hutchinson.

1770 William Hutchinson died in July and his estate was contested in a case that was decided by the New Jersey Supreme Court in May 1792. [16]

1771 A suit regarding a 1763 obligation was instituted against the administrator of William Hutchinson in May 1771 [17].

1771 After William's death, his son Robert, sold William's land claiming it as "eldest son and Heir". Ann Hutchinson sued son Robert and those he sold the land to, which included some of her other children, in the NJ Supreme Court. A Writ of Dower against Robert Hutchinson was issued to the Monmouth County Sheriff to bring him before the court and without delay "he render unto Anne Hutchinson who was the Wife of William Hutchinson her reasonable Dower of the Lands & Tenements in Monmouth County afd which were the sd William Hutchinson formerly her Husband...", dated Oct 12, 1772. Supreme Court action against Robert Hutchinson's actions was being taken as early as the May 1771 term where in Cortland Skinner, Atty General, filed suit against "Robert Hutchinson, Admr. Wm Hutchinson". Ann filed suits against her children regarding her Dower rights in 1773 in the New Jersey Supreme Court. [18]

1772 Son Robert Hutchinson inherited the estate of William Hutchinson and sold it to John Ely in June for £875. [19]

1772 In a Monmouth County deed, dated June 25, 1772, his oldest son, Robert [born 11 December 1720 mentioned that William Hutchinson was deceased, when he sold his land to John Ely, Junior, which Robert had received from his father.

1772 After William's death, his son Robert, sold William's land claiming it as "eldest son and Heir". He made no consideration for Ann Simpson Hutchinson's Dower rights. Ann sued Robert and those he sold the land to, which included some of her other children, in the NJ Supreme Court. A Writ of Dower against Robert Hutchinson was issued to the Monmouth County Sheriff to bring him before the court and without delay "he render unto Anne Hutchinson who was the Wife of William Hutchinson her reasonable Dower of the Lands & Tenements in Monmouth County and which were the sd William Hutchinson formerly her Husband...", dated Oct 12, 1772.

1774 Judgement was made on the 1771 suit in April 1774. [20]

1776 The premises in dispute were sold on 31 July 1776 to Daniel Jones by the sheriff. [21]

1776 John Ely, who purchased the estate from Robert Hutchinson, died in November. The estate passed on to John Ely Jr. [22]

1779 Daniel Jones came into posession of the estate in March. John Ely Jr claimed ownership and brought suit against Daniel Jones. [23]

1801 An obituary for Ann Hutchinson reported: "Ann Hutchinson, age 101, died 4 January 1801, at the house of Robt. Willis in East Windsor township, Middlesex County. She was the mother of 13 children and grandmother to 375 ." Her death in New Jersey was reported in an Ohio newspaper, likely due to the fact that many of her descendants lived in the Ohio area. The inscription on Ann's gravestone in the family burial plot on their homestead land in East Windsor, NJ reads: "Sacred to the Memory of Ann Hutchinson, Relict of Wm Hutchinson Esqr. departed this Life Jany. 4th 1801. Aged 101 years 9 Months and seven days. She was mother of 13 children, and Grand Mother and great grand mother, & great great Grand Mother of 375 Persons." [24][25]

1802 Methodist Rev. Francis Asbury recorded in his journal, about 18 May, that he had visited Sylvester Hutchinson at Milford, New Jersey. "Whilst at Milford, I read the inscription on the gravestone of Ann Hutchinson, her maiden name was Simpson; she was born upon Long Island, and married in the county of Middlesex, state of New Jersey. ... About [age] eighty, she in a great degree, lost her sight; about ninety, it returned; ... I have seen her, and conversed with her: at this advanced age she did not appear to be weary of the world." [26]

Research notes:

1777 On 19 March, the list of goods of William Hutchinson was appraised by Sam Bagles and Peter Gulick. On 31 March, an inventory of the intestate will of William Hutchinson of Middlesex Co was recorded in Burlington Co by John Applegate. [I see no evidence that this inventory is for this William Hutchinson, except for coincidence of name, time, and place][NJ Archives, microfilm, Trenton, New Jersey, Lot N 18 folio 218]

"Another large tract of land early taken up in the township was that often referred to as the Hutchinson tract. It was surveyed to William Hutchinson, a justice of the peace under the crown and government of England by governmental authority, and has been thus described: "All the land bounded easterly by or near the Earl of Perth's patent ... It included the site of that portion of Hightstown borough lying south of Rocky Brook. Hutchinson and a brother came to America from England, probably in the seventeenth century. His wife was Ann Simpson, who was born March 17, 1699, and died Jan. 4, 1801, having lived in three centuries to the age of one hundred and one years, nine months, and seven days, retaining her faculties to the last, having been able, it is said, to thread a needle or read without spectacles in her one hundred and first year. This family have been remarkable for longevity. Joseph Hutchinson, son of William and Ann Hutchinson ... lived on the William R. Hutchinson place. He was a very exemplary and pious man, and between 1780 and 1790 was one of the very small number who formed the old Methodist class in Milford, and the history of the old Hutchinson family is identified with the early history of Methodism in this part of the country. William Hutchinson, another son of William and Ann, lived on the Daniel P. Hutchinson place, and had four sons, who became Methodist preachers, viz.: Revs. Ezekiel, Robert, Sylvester, and Aaron Hutchinson, ..." [27]

The following story appeared in the Village Record, of Hightstown, New Jersey, dated 20 Nov 1857:

Mr. Editor: On the farm now owned by Isaac Goldy, near Milford, about 2.5 miles from Hightstown, there is an ancient burial ground, wherein several of the old owners of the soil thereabout found the last resting place of their earthly remains. From a tombstone in that place I copy the following, verbatim et literatu: "Sacred to the Memory of Ann Hutchinson, Relict of Wm Hutchinson Esqr. departed this Life Jany. 4th 1801. Aged 101 years 9 Months and seven days. She was mother of 13 children, and Grand Mother and great grand mother, & great great Grand Mother of 375 Persons." I give also the punctuation and Capital letters. ... she was born on the 17th day of March 1699, and consequently lived in three different centuries, i.e. she was born on the 17th, lived through the whole 18th, and died in the 19th century. ... She was the wife of Wm. Hutchinson, Esq, a Justice of the Peace under the crown and government of England. This William Hutchinson took up from the government all the land bounded easterly by or near the Earl of Perth's Patent, (at the corner of the farm now owned by Mr. Wesley Sill,) and bounded northerly by Rocky Brook, and extending westerly to at or about the farm now owned by Thomas Mount, (son of Hiram Mount, dec'd); and extending southerly also to the Ely tract, (a tract of 1500 acres taken up by John Ely, my great grandfather,) at or about the property now owned by Abijah J. Chamberlin. You will perceive then, Mr. Editor, that your office, and all of Hightstown south of Rocky Brook, stands on the tract of this old lady's husband. Her first residence was a dwelling made of pallisadoes, a few yards from where Mr. Goldy now lives. My uncle, the late Rev. Robert Hutchinson, dec'd, and Mrs. Phebe Hutchinson, widow of Rev. Sylvester Hutchinson, gave me several particulars in reference to the old Hutchinson family, which I have not the space to fully record. Ann Hutchinson retained her faculties to the last, and could see to thread a needle or read without spectacles when in her 101st year. The family have been remarkable for longevity. Her son, Joseph Hutchinson, (very properly and justly called in his day by the Methodist Father Hutchinson,) lived on the place where Wm. R. Hutchinson now lives. I well recollect the old gentleman myself. He was a very exemplary and pious man, and between 1780 and 1790 was one of a very small class or society in Milford. About the time Methodism began to be frequently preached; my grand father, Richard Ely, who died in 1791, in his life time invited the Methodists ministers to preach in his house, and in warm weather they sometimes preached in his barn; he lived where Richard A. Ely, son of my uncle Aaron Ely, now lives, in Millstone township. I have heard my father frequently say that he remembered, though then young, when these meetings were held at his father's. By (sic) why digress into the history of Methodism? Because the history of the old Hutchinson family is identified with the early history of Methodism in this part of the country. William Hutchinson, another son of this Ann, lived where Daniel P. Hutchinson now lives, and had four sons, all of whom turned out to be Methodist preachers, viz: Ezekiel Hutchinson, Robert Hutchinson, Sylvester Hutchinson and Aaron Hutchinson, all of whom have passed the earth. Ezekiel Hutchinson removed, many years before his death, to Ohio. My mother, who departed this life in 1819, was one of the little band of despised Methodists (for Methodists were persecuted and despised in their infancy) who formed the church at Milford, and having been brought up to attend that church till I arrived almost to manhood, and conversing much with the Hutchinson family, I became of necessity acquainted with many facts in relation to that family, and to the Methodist Church at Milford; which facts are many of them given by Judge Pearce in the Record, a few weeks back, and are in accordance with what I remember having heard from old people. There are many respectable families descended from this Ann Hutchinson in the United States - Among those of her descendants now living on the old Hutchinson tract are William R. Hutchinson, Daniel P. Hutchinson, and the present Treasurer of New Jersey, R.M. Smith, Esq. J.J.E. [Joseph J. Ely]

In the Village Record on the following week of the 27th Nov 1857, a response to the above article was made by a great-grandson, Daniel P. Hutchinson, of William & Ann:

“Mr. editor - Having noticed an article in your paper of the 20th inst., relative to the history of William and Ann Hutchinson, their burial place, and descendants, and thinking it may be interesting to some of your readers who may have lost the knowledge of their ancestors, I ask your indulgence while I speak of some matters connected with these things.

William Hutchinson and one of his brothers came from England to this county early in the 18th century. The maiden name of his wife Ann, was Simpson. Their family of children, thirteen in number, as is recorded on Ann Hutchinson's tombstone, consisted of five boys and eight girls. From these branches have sprung numerous families, bearing the name of Tindall in the neighborhood of Hamilton Square; English and Laird in Englishtown; Ely, Wilson, Moore, Taylor, and others, of this vicinity; Kannan [Kinnan], Bennett and others, of New Brunswick. The marriages into families of these names took place about one century ago. With later generations come in the names of Cubberly, Dey, Moore, Taylor, James, Hartman, and many others down to the present time, and now beside hundreds of Hutchinsons in this vicinity, these descendants may be found in almost every resident name among us. Although the date of the woman's birth reaches back a period of about one hundred and sixty years, and her descendants are numbered in the thousands, yet if she were living to-day in your borough, she might receive daily visits from a grand-daughter who is now in the middle age of life, while in other branches of the family she might look upon children with a string of greats too long for any but a clear-headed person to mention. ... D.P.H. [Daniel P. Hutchinson]
[Today, this ancient cemetery still exists off of Cedarville Road but with only the two existing stones of Ann (Simpson) Hutchinson and her husband William plus pieces of other fieldstones used as grave markers.]
William is buried in field to the right of the big bend in the road from Etra to Roosevelt, after leaving Etra, by Feldsher Road. The two trees in the field to the right mark the spot of these two graves.

I found unauthored notes & material on the Hutchinson family in the New Jersey Historical Society in 1980s in an uncataloged cardboard box. I was given access to this material that appeared to have been given to the Society from a family. It contained newspaper clips, notes, and many pages of handwritten family sheets. I believe that this material MAY have come from Elmer Tindall Hutchinson, who was an officer of the Society and a well known author and historian. In this material, was information on the William and Ann (Simpson) Hutchinson family, which indicated that an Isaac Hutchinson of Three Hills Run, NJ, had the family record material on William and Ann."
End of [edited] quote from the Richard S Hutchinson website.

Other researchers list William's father as Robert Hutchinson, one of the persecuted Scotch, who came to Perth Amboy in 1685, before William's birth. [28] A biography of Elizabeth Hartman reports that she was descended of William Hutchinson, who settled in Massachusetts Bay in 1626 and who was the father of this William. However, DNA evidence shows no paternal link to the Massachusetts Hutchinsons [29][30]. William Hutchinson's ancestry is currently unclear.

A neighbor reports the following. "Wm. Hutchinson, Esq, a Justice of the Peace under the crown and government of England. This William Hutchinson took up from the government all the land bounded easterly by or near the Earl of Perth's Patent, (at the corner of the farm now owned by Mr. Wesley Sill,) and bounded northerly by Rocky Brook, and extending westerly to at or about the farm now owned by Thomas Mount, (son of Hiram Mount, dec'd); and extending southerly also to the Ely tract, (a tract of 1500 acres taken up by John Ely, my great grandfather,) at or about the property now owned by Abijah J. Chamberlin." ... "Ann Hutchinson retained her faculties to the last, and could see to thread a needle or read without spectacles when in her 101st year. The family have been remarkable for longevity. Her son, Joseph Hutchinson, (very properly and justly called in his day by the Methodist Father Hutchinson,) lived on the place where Wm. R. Hutchinson now lives. I well recollect the old gentleman myself. He was a very exemplary and pious man, and between 1780 and 1790 was one of a very small class or society in Milford." ... "the history of the old Hutchinson family is identified with the early history of Methodism in this part of the country. William Hutchinson, another son of this Ann, lived where Daniel P. Hutchinson now lives, and had four sons, all of whom turned out to be Methodist preachers, viz: Ezekiel Hutchinson, Robert Hutchinson, Sylvester Hutchinson and Aaron Hutchinson, all of whom have passed the earth. Ezekiel Hutchinson removed, many years before his death, to Ohio." Source: not recorded.

A bio sketch of grandson Sylvester Hutcheson reports the following:
"There was a very large family of them. Their grandmother lived to a good old age. On her tombstone is the following inscription:

In Memory of Mrs. Ann Hutchinson, Relict of William Hutchinson, Mother of thirteen children,
Grandmother and Great.great-grandmother of upward of, three hundred children.
She died, Aged a hundred and one years, nine months, and seven days, In January, 1801.

Since the Rev. Noble W. Thomas gave me this description I find that Bishop Asbury names this extraordinary woman, and the epitaph upon her tomb- atone. The bishop says that at "about eighty she, in a great degree, lost her sight; about ninety it returned. Her hair changed a few years ago from white to dark brown. I have seen her and conversed with her. At this advanced age she did not appear to be weary of the world."-Journal, vol. iii, p. 66."

A biosketch report of a grandson reports "Robert S. Hartman, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Union City; born in Clermont County, Ohio, Dec. 2, 1824; his father, Samuel Hartman, was born in Middlesex Co. New Jersey, March 19, 1790; in 1795, he emigrated with his parents to Kentucky, and in 1801, came to the Territory of Ohio and located in Clermont County; he died May 13, 1862, upon the old homestead, where he located sixty-one years previous- his first wife was Sarah Dunham; she died in Brown County, Ohio, in 1841, leaving eight children, of whom two now survive. The subject of this sketch was raised to farm labor until 1 8 years of age; the following six years he devoted to farming and carpentering; in February, 1856, he came to Darke County, and is classed among the old settlers, having been a resident for nearly a quarter of a century. He married Abigail Jones in 1849; she died in 1860, leaving one child - Franklin D. His marriage with Mary E. Marsh was celebrated in Darke County Jan. 23, 1862; she came to Darke County with her father, William Marsh, in 1853, where her father died after a residence of ten months. The children of Robert S. and Mary E. (Marsh) Hartman were eight in number, of whom four are deceased; the living are William T., Nancy E., Robert M. and George W. The great-grandmother of Robert S. Hartman, Ann Hutchinson, born March 16, 1700 (old style), was the mother of William Hutchinson, whose daughter Mary married Christopher Hartman in April, 1777; William Hutchinson was born Dec. 13, 1724; Catherine (Vohn) Hutchinson, his wife, was born May 17, 1731; their children were Mary, born March 24, 1755; William, March 12, 1757; Hannah, Aug. 9, 1759; Robert, July 26, 1763; Sylvester, April 20, 1765; Aaron. May 17. 1767; Ezekiel, Oct. 18, 1769: Ann, July 8, 1772; Catherine, Jan. 3, 1775. The grandfather of Robert S. Hartman was Christopher Hartman, born May 6, 1750; Mary Hutchinson, his wife was born March 24, 1755; they were the parents of eight children - William, born Feb. 17, 1778; Isaac, Sept. 2, 1779; Rebecca, June 3, 1781; Elizabeth, May 22, 1783; Katharine, Sept. 27, 1785; Samuel, March 19, 1790; Fanny. March 5, 1793; Rachael, Dec. 29, 1796. Samuel Hartman, the father of Robert S. Hartman, was twice married; his first wife was Sarah Dunham, who was the mother of Robert S.; she died in Brown County, Ohio, in 1841; of eight children, only two now survive; his second wife was Mrs. Elizabeth (Huntington) Browning, married Oct. 17,1844; four children were born to them—Sarah F., born Aug. 4, 1845; Jane A., May 12, 1847; Emily C, April 10, 1849; Nancy E., April 13, 1851." [31]

There are reports [likely wrong] that Ann was born in Amsterdam, Holland. "William Hutchinson was born in 1695, and his wife, whose maiden name was Ann Von, was born March 6, 1700. She was a native of Amsterdam, Holland, and at the age of six years was kidnapped and brought to America. There is speculation that she is of royal lineage. They were married in 1723." [32]. "Ann Von was born March 6, 1700, in Amsterdam, Holland. When a child of six years, she was kidnapped and brought to America." [33] This might be confused with the wife of son William.

Smith reports that Thomas Hutchinson of Beverly (Yoeman) and George Hutchinson of Sheffield, both in the county of York in England, were among 4 principal creditors for the purchase of New Jersey from William Penn (Page 92, footnote). I have found no clear evidence for William's ancestry.


Footnotes:

[1] Richard Hutchinson's website for Hutchinson Genealogy, WilliamAnnHutchinson, [Richard_Hutchinson_Website].

[2] Joseph R. Mosher, The Hutchinson Family: New Jersey to Clermont County, Ohio (1994), 4, 9, [Google_Book].

[3] Major E. M. Woodward and John Hageman, History of Burlington and Mercer Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1883), 757, right column, bottom, [HathiTrust].

[4] W. H. McIntosh, The History of Darke County, Ohio (W. H. Beers & Co: 1890), 738, [HathiTrust], [Google_Book], [Internet_Archive].

[5] Joseph R. Mosher, The Hutchinson Family: New Jersey to Clermont County, Ohio (1994), 9, Suggests Rhode Island as her birthplace, [Google_Book].

[6] Richard Hutchinson's website for Hutchinson Genealogy, JonathanHutchinson, [Richard_Hutchinson_Website].

[7] Richard Hutchinson's website for Hutchinson Genealogy, WilliamAnnHutchinson, [Richard_Hutchinson_Website].

[8] Richard S. Hutchinson, East New Jersey Land Records, 1757-1763, Books I2 and K2 (Lewes, Delaware: Colonial Roots, 2005), 30 (I2 p 139).

[9] Frederick W. Ricord and W.M. Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 15. (Governors 3, 1738-1748) (1891), 464, [Google_Book], [Internet_Archive].

[10] Frederick W. Ricord and W.M. Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 15. (Governors 3, 1738-1748) (1891), 564, [Google_Book], [Internet_Archive].

[11] Frederick W. Ricord, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 16. (Governors 4, 1748-1755) (1891), 77, [Google_Book], [Internet_Archive].

[12] Frederick W. Ricord, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 17. (Governors 5, 1756-1768) (1891), 503, [Google_Book], [Internet_Archive].

[13] Richard S. Hutchinson, East New Jersey Land Records, 1747-1757, Books G2 and H2 (Lewes, Delaware: Colonial Roots, 2005), 127, Book H2 page 255, [Google_Book].

[14] Richard S. Hutchinson, East New Jersey Land Records, 1757-1763, Books I2 and K2 (Lewes, Delaware: Colonial Roots, 2005), 90 (K2 p 76).

[15] Richard S. Coxe, Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of New-Jersey 1790-1795, New Jersey Law Reports, Vol. 1, (Burlington, New Jersey: 1816), Den, on the Demise of Ely vs Jones, 131-5, at 131, [Google_Book].

[16] Richard S. Coxe, Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of New-Jersey 1790-1795, New Jersey Law Reports, Vol. 1, (Burlington, New Jersey: 1816), Den, on the Demise of Ely vs Jones, 131-5, at 131, [Google_Book].

[17] Richard S. Coxe, Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of New-Jersey 1790-1795, New Jersey Law Reports, Vol. 1, (Burlington, New Jersey: 1816), Den, on the Demise of Ely vs Jones, 131-5, at 131, [Google_Book].

[18] New Jersey State Archives, Supreme Court (online database), Hutchinson: 16559, 17864, 15898, 20813, we seek copies of these, [NJ_State_Archives].

[19] Richard S. Coxe, Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of New-Jersey 1790-1795, New Jersey Law Reports, Vol. 1, (Burlington, New Jersey: 1816), Den, on the Demise of Ely vs Jones, 131-5, at 131, [Google_Book].

[20] Richard S. Coxe, Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of New-Jersey 1790-1795, New Jersey Law Reports, Vol. 1, (Burlington, New Jersey: 1816), Den, on the Demise of Ely vs Jones, 131-5, at 131, [Google_Book].

[21] Richard S. Coxe, Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of New-Jersey 1790-1795, New Jersey Law Reports, Vol. 1, (Burlington, New Jersey: 1816), Den, on the Demise of Ely vs Jones, 131-5, at 131, [Google_Book].

[22] Richard S. Coxe, Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of New-Jersey 1790-1795, New Jersey Law Reports, Vol. 1, (Burlington, New Jersey: 1816), Den, on the Demise of Ely vs Jones, 131-5, at 131, [Google_Book].

[23] Richard S. Coxe, Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of New-Jersey 1790-1795, New Jersey Law Reports, Vol. 1, (Burlington, New Jersey: 1816), Den, on the Demise of Ely vs Jones, 131-5, at 131, [Google_Book].

[24] David Hogan, "A Register of Marriages and Deaths, 1800-1801," The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 23 (1899), 98-103, 241-248, 360-367, at 362, [Google_Book].

[25] Karen Mauer Green, Pioneer Ohio Newspapers 1793-1810 (Galveston, Texas: Frontier Press, 1986), 60, [Google_Book].

[26] Francis Asbur, The Journal of the Rev. Francis Asbury, Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Vol. 3 (1821), 63, [Google_Book].

[27] Major E. M. Woodward and John Hageman, History of Burlington and Mercer Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1883), 757, right column, [HathiTrust].

[28] Edwin Salter, A History of Monmouth and Ocean Counties (1890), 72, [Google_Book].

[29] Hutchinson of NJ DNA website, [Link].

[30] Hutchinson of MA DNA website, [Link].

[31] W. H. McIntosh, The History of Darke County, Ohio (W. H. Beers & Co: 1890), 738, [HathiTrust], [Google_Book], [Internet_Archive].

[32] J. L. Rockey and R. J. Bancroft, 1795 History of Clermont County, Ohio, with illustrations and biographical sketches of its prominent men and pioneers (Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts & Co, 1880), 513, [HathiTrust].

[33] Charles Frederick Gross, Cincinnati The Queen City 1788-1912, Vol. 4 (Cincinnati: S.J.Clark Publishing Company, 1912), 148, [HathiTrust].


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