Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy --- Go to Genealogy Page for Sylvester Hutchinson --- Go to Genealogy Page for Phebe Phillips

Notes for Sylvester Hutchinson and Phebe Phillips

1765 "Rev. Sylvester Hutchinson was the third of four brothers, all of whom became Methodist preachers. Three of the four were itinerants. Asbury was a friend to this family, and mentions in his journal the grandmother of these brothers, Ann Hutchinson, who died nearly 102 years of age. Sylvester Hutchinson was born in the town of Milford, New Jersey, April 20, 1765. At the age of twenty-one he was convicted of sin, and sought forgiveness through Jesus Christ. His experience was peculiar, but of a character more common in his day than now. It is related that he saw an appearance at the head of his bed, which he believed to be the figure of Christ. This at once satisfied him, and he no more doubted." [1]

1782 Phoebe Phillips was born January 19, 1782. [2]

Reverend Sylvester Hutchinson was a minister of the Methodist Church and traveled widely as a circuit-riding minister.

1789 Sylvester Hutchinson was an itinerant Methodist preacher in Salem, New Jersey. [3]

1790 Sylvester Hutchinson was ordained as a Methodist deacon. [4]

1791 Sylvester Hutchinson was an itinerant Methodist preacher in Fells Point, Maryland. [5]

1792 Sylvester Hutchinson was an itinerant Methodist preacher in Wilmington, Delaware. [6]

1793 Sylvester Hutchinson was ordained as a Methodist elder and rode the Croton circuit in New York. [7]

1794 Sylvester Hutchinson was in charge of the New Rochelle, New York circuit of Methodist preachers. [8]

1796-97 Sylvester Hutchinson was an associate to the appointment of Freeborn Garrettson as a Methodist preacher in New London, Pittsfield, and New York. [9]

1797-99 Sylvester Hutchinson was a presiding elder of the Methodist Episcopal Church. [10][11]

There is some dispute about whether Sylvester Hutchinson married Sarah Deveau, daughter of Frederick Deveau. "The widow and son [of Sylvester], however, recollect distinctly having heard him say over and over again that Mr. Asbury was to blame for his leaving the Church. He said he was in the good graces of Mr. Asbury until the difficulty occurred about his marriage: that he was to marry a young lady belonging to an influential family, and the friends, especially one brother, made such desperate opposition, that the engagement was broken off the day the wedding was to have taken place; that Mr. Asbury reprimanded him severely for not marrying the girl at all hazards, as he was engaged to her; that both of them being of good metal, they had a warm time; that Sylvester came home on a visit, and that Mr. Asbury had his name left off the Minutes." [12]

1801 Sylvester Hutchinson was an elder of the Methodist Episcopal Church. [13]

1802 Sarah Deveau died. Bishop Frances Asbury preached at Sarah's funeral in the Bowery church in New York.

No date Sylvester Hutchinson "went West and entered into a land agency; he also became a book publisher in Trenton, New Jersey" [14]

1802 William Lytle sold 100 acres in Clermont County, Ohio to Sylvester Hutchinson for $200 on 29 November. John and Frances Stall sold 250 acres in Clermont County, Ohio to Sylvester for $500, also on 29 November. Sylvester also owned land in Williamsburg, Ohio. [15]

1802 Sylvester Hutchinson sold 120 acres in Pleasant Run to Ezekiel in Clermont County, Ohio. [16]

1806 Sylvester Hutcheson/Hutchinson was taxed in Clermont County, Ohio. [17]

1806 Sylvester Hutchinson sold 2 lots in Williamsburg to Joseph James in Clermont County, Ohio. [18]

1806 Sylvester Hutchinson, of Middlesex, NJ gave to Isaac Hartman, of Williamsburgh, Clermont County, Ohio, on 1 Mar, Power of attorney to sell VMD lands. [19]

1807 On 25 July, Sylvestor Hutchinson, of Middlesex, NJ by atty granted to Ezekial Hutchinson, 100 acres - $100 Pleasant Run. [20]

1807 On 25 July, Sylvester Hutchinson, of Middlesex, NJ by atty to Ezekial Hutchinson, 130a - $215 East Fork of LM. [21]

1808 On the 10th of May, 1808, Sylvester Hutchinson was married to Miss Phebe Phillips of Hunterdon County, New Jersey. [22][23]

1810 Sylvester Hutchinson sold most of his land to his brother Ezekiel, who was living in Clermont Co. Sylvester's residence was listed as Middlesex County, New Jersey.

1808-20 Rev. Sylvester Hutchinson was taxed in East Windsor Twp, Middlesex County, New Jersey 1808-1809 and 1819-21. [24]

1818 Sylvester Hutchinson was an executor and signed the inventory of the estate of father William Hutchinson in Middlesex County, New Jersey.

1830 Sylvester Hutchinson lived in East Windsor Twp, Mercer County, New Jersey in a household with Males: one age 5-10, two age 15-20, two age 20-30, one age 60-70 [Sylvester] and Females: three daughters and one age 40-50 [Phebe]. [25]

1840 Sylvester Hutchinson lived in East Windsor Twp, Mercer County, New Jersey in a household with two males age 15-30, one age 70-80 [Sylvester] and Females: two daughters age 15-30, and one age 50-60 [Phebe]. [26]

1840 The will and inventory for Sylvester Hutchinson was recorded 91K and W in New Jersey.

1840,1865 Sylvester Hutchinson and wife Phebe were buried in the Cedar Hill Cemetery in Hightstown, New Jersey. [27]

1850 Phebe Hutchinson lived in East Windsor Twp, Mercer County, New Jersey with Daniel Hutchinson, age 25. [28]

1860 Phebe Hutchinson lived in East Windsor Twp, Mercer County, New Jersey with Daniel P Hutchinson, age 35. [29]

1866 Phoebe Phillips Hutchinson died. She was buried at Hightstown, New Jersey. [30]

A Sketch on American Methodism gives the following report: "Sylvester Hutcheson was the colleague of Jesse Lee this year. He had been presiding elder on the district which extended from New-York to Canada. As Mr. Hutchinson located we have no account of him in the Minutes, but by conversing with men of olden time, who will not be with us long to repeat the story, I have found out much concerning this distinguished servant of God that has never appeared in print before. There were three brothers in the itinerant ministry, Sylvester, Robert, and Aaron. An old preacher whom time has shaken by the hand, who was well acquainted with the Hutchinson family, says they were born in Burlington County, New Jersey...

Sylvester was a very able minister of the New Testament. He was a "son of thunder." Sometimes he was as rough as a grater. He gave the peepie strong meat. He battled nobly for God and truth for a number of years. He was a man of small stature, and yet had a powerful voice, and was not afraid to use it. He was the traveling companion of Bishop Whatcoat and Bishop Asbury. Mr. Hutchinson joined the conference in 1789, and, after having performed a vast amount of hard labor, that would have broken down any ordinary man, he located in 1806. He was Bishop Hedding's first presiding elder, and he always spoke of him in the most exalted terms. The following incident, that took place on Salem Circuit, New Jersey, the first Mr. Hutchinson ever traveled, will show his character. He was sitting one day in a house, waiting for the hour of preaching, when two young women entered the room, and seemed inclined to have some sport with the boy-preacher. They began to ridicule his size, and his insignificant appearance, when, suddenly raising his head from a reclining posture, he repeated, in slow and solemn tones, these impressive words:
"My thoughts on awful subjects roll,
Damnation and the dead;
What horrors seize the guilty soul
Upon a dying bed." -

His voice, his gesture, his manner, showed the deep feelings of his heart. The young women were powerfully convicted, fled into another room, fell on their knees begging for mercy, and rested not till they found a shelter in the bosom of the Son of God. When Mr. Hutchinson was presiding elder of the New-York District, he frequently put up in what was called "Methodist taverns," where he shared in the hospitality of the people, and his bill was ever paid in advance. He was frequently entertained at the house of Samuel Jones, Esq., father-in-law of the Rev. Tobias Spicer, who resided in Peekakill Hollow. The family were always pleased with their guest, and in the bosom of this family he felt at home. On his tour round his district, at a certain time, Mr. Hutchinson came to the house of Mr. Jones, and he and his family were all away; their house was left desolate. At that time people left home without locking their doors, taking it for granted that all would be safe when they returned. They were about as secure as we are in these days of" bars, bolts, locks, keys," etc. When the family returned they were astonished to find their house had been entered by burglars, or some one else, and they found some one had been writing on the table with chalk, which, on examination, read thus:

"Sylvester Hutchinson has been here;
He's done no harm, you need not fear;
He's fed his horse with hay and grain;
He's eaten dinner, and gone again."

The family were much pleased with the liberty Mr. Hutchinson had taken in going to the barn and feeding his horse with hay and oats, and entering the "buttery" and helping himself to the substantials of life, as well as with the amusing lines upon the table.

The cause of Mr. Hutchinson's location was a painful one. There were many ministers who located at that period, some for the want of support and some for other causes; and I have often wondered why Sylvester Hutchinson, who was a host in himself and did such noble service for God and truth, should so suddenly retire from the ranks and go into the shade. I have just learned why. It is another illustration of the saying, "the course of true love never runs smooth." My friend, Rev. Tobias Spicer, knew Mr. Hutchinson well, and is acquainted with the circumstances that led to his location. He was engaged to be married to an amiable young lady, who was willing to give her hand to and share in the fortunes of a Methodist preacher. She belonged to one of the first families in the state, who were rather aristocratic, belonging to what they considered the "upper crust." They thought it would be degrading to the family, lowering their dignity, for one of them to unite their fortunes with a Methodist preacher. However, the day was fixed for the wedding and the guests were invited. A brother made such tremendous opposition that the wedding was given up, and all thoughts of their union abandoned.

Mr. Hutchinson must have been more than steel to have endured this. The shock was great, the disappointment wonderful. It so preyed upon him that he left his work and went West, and entered into a land agency. When he returned, no one invited him to resume his work, to re-enter the itinerant field, and he concluded his services were not wanted. For years he labored as a local preacher. After a while he entered into the book business, and, in partnership with the late Daniel Fenton, of Trenton, New Jersey, he published a "History of the Bible," which was sold to subscribers. Mr. Spicer often heard him preach. He would begin in a low tone of voice, and then raise it to the highest pitch, till he screamed, and then it was rather disagreeable.

Mr. Hutchinson was a curious, observing man, and always had something interesting to communicate. He was a fine-looking man, with a very intelligent countenance. A few years ago he died. His history after his location shows the exceeding danger of ministers leaving their legitimate calling. The history of many men who have left the great work to which God has called them should be a warning to others. Ministers should never think of locating till they locate in the neighborhood of the throne of God." [31]


Footnotes:

[1] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 138, [Google_Book].

[2] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 141, [Google_Book].

[3] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 138, [Google_Book].

[4] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 138, [Google_Book].

[5] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 138, [Google_Book].

[6] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 138, [Google_Book].

[7] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 138, [Google_Book].

[8] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 42, [Google_Book].

[9] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 70, [Google_Book].

[10] Minutes of the annual conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church for the years 1773-1828 (1840), 188, [HathiTrust].

[11] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 12,41, [Google_Book].

[12] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 140-41, [Google_Book].

[13] Minutes of the annual conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church for the years 1773-1828 (1840), 96, right column, [HathiTrust].

[14] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 140, [Google_Book].

[15] Alma Aicholtz Smith, Clermont County, Ohio Deeds and Mortgages 1791-1830, An Index (1991), 140.

[16] Alma Aicholtz Smith, Clermont County, Ohio Deeds and Mortgages 1791-1830, An Index (1991), 131, citing deed D03-101.

[17] Rootsweb, Clermont County, Ohio Tax List 1800-1810, [Rootsweb].

[18] Alma Aicholtz Smith, Clermont County, Ohio Deeds and Mortgages 1791-1830, An Index (1991), 131, citing deed D03-102.

[19] Alma Aicholtz Smith, Clermont County, Ohio Deeds and Mortgages 1791-1830, An Index (1991), 131, citing deed F05-59.

[20] Alma Aicholtz Smith, Clermont County, Ohio Deeds and Mortgages 1791-1830, An Index (1991), 131, citing deed F05-61.

[21] Alma Aicholtz Smith, Clermont County, Ohio Deeds and Mortgages 1791-1830, An Index (1991), 131, citing deed F05-36.

[22] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 140, [Google_Book].

[23] Eli Field Cooley, William Scudder Cooley, Genealogy of Early Settlers in Trenton and Ewing Old Hunterdon County New Jersey (Trenton, NJ: 1883), 184, [Google_Book].

[24] Ronald Vern Jackson, New Jersey Tax Lists 1772-1822, Vol. 3 (1981), 1790-91, [Ancestry_Search].

[25] US census, 1830, NJ, Mercer, East Windsor, p 288

[26] US census, 1840, NJ, Mercer, East Windsor, p 7

[27] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 140-41, [Google_Book].

[28] US census, 1850, NJ, Mercer, East Windsor, family 930

[29] US census, 1860, NJ, Mercer, East Windsor, family 266

[30] Edwin Warriner, Old Sands Street Methodist Episcopal Church of Brooklyn NY (NY: Phillips & Hunt, 1885), 141, [Google_Book].

[31] Joseph Beaumont Wakeley. Lost chapters recovered from the early history of American Methodism (1858), 526, of 526-32, [Google_Book], [Internet_Archive].


Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy
Go to Genealogy Page for Sylvester Hutchinson
Go to Genealogy Page for Phebe Phillips
Go to Index for surname Hutchinson
Go to Index for surname Phillips
Go to Home Page for Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy
Click here to send us an email with comments or corrections about this page.