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c 1651 Abiah Edwards was born. [Based on age 22 in 1673]

1670 Abiah Edwards was an apprentice as a ship carpenter in Suffolk County, Massachusetts. On 24 March, the inventory of the estate of Benjamin Gillam, ship carpenter late of Boston, included four apprentices, viz: Miles Sansell, Abiah Edward (about one more year to serve), Joseph Heaven, and Caleb Chafen. [1]

1671 Abiah Edwards' lawyer took action in court to gain control of the estate of his father, Philip Edwards. "Ordr about Phil: Edwards Estate Upon the request of William Holiway Attorney to Abiah Edwards the right heir to ye Estate of Phillip Edwards late of Dorchester, deceased, the Court orders William Trescott (who Administred on aforesaid Estate) to deliver it up to the abovesaid Holloway, he the above said Holloway giving security to this Court for the vallue that it may be to the use of the right heir abovesd." [2][See the intestate settlements dated 1793 and 1827]

1673 Abiah Edwards testified, in Suffolk County, Massachusetts, about the sea-worthiness of a ship. In a civil case for damages (Miller v. Risco, document S.F. 1245.9), Abiah Edwards and three others provided expert testimony to the court on the condition of a vessel called Good Hope. "Wee whose names are here underwritten being by authority ordered to Survey the good shipe Brigantine Robert Risco master belonging to the Colony of Carolina and Bound for England and forthwith to give in or Judgmts of her ability for the said voyage Therfore in obedience to yor honrs Comands wee have been on board the said vessell & being uncapable of viewing the hold of her shee being laden with goods Cannot say anything to it. But her uppr worke & Riggin wee find Defective wch makes her if not repaired uncapable to performe a voyage soe long and full of Difficulty: The Master of sd vessell informed us that Coming over the Barr at the Inlet of Carolina the vessell grounded and beat much upon the Showld since which shee hath been leaky. Therfore Doubting her Bottom may bee prjudiced our Judgmt is there may bee a Carfull view taken thereof and what is amiss bee amended. (signed) John Hickes, Henry Beere, George Joye, Abiah Edwards." Of the signers, only Abiah Edwards gave an individual report, as follows: "Abiah Edwards aged two & twenty yeeres or thereabouts testifieth yt hee was one of the persons who viewed the vessell above & set his hand to this Retune & see it signed by the other persons this 30th 4 mo 1673. Taken before mee Walter Calrke, assistant ... true coppie Issac Addintonn Cler" [3][https://sites.google.com/site/edwardsfootprints/family-calendar/family-origins-p-2]

1679 On 6 November, Abiah Edwards owned land in Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, New Jersey. "Survey [East Jersey] for Mrs. Elizabeth Hatton of 2 Parcels. Bordering lands of Jacob Coale; Henry Green "now ab Edwards"; Eliakim Wardell; and Francois Le Maistre. [Patent date: 10 Jan. 1681/1682] (See also: Liber II, Pt. 1; folio 47) 74 Acres. Shrewsbury (Long Branch; Cole Brook; Shrewsberry River; Goose Neck)." [4]

1681-2 On Feb 9, Abiah Edwards was executor and witness to the last will and testament of Francis Masters, of Shrewsbury Twp, Monmouth County, New Jersey, which named wife Mary; children Clemens, Poolemah, Mary, Cobas, and Vogden. The wife, Joseph Parker, and Abiah Edwards were executors and the last two were witnesses. Proved July 24 1684. [5]

1682 March 31 Return of survey for 127 acres upon Long Branch in the Town of Shrewsbury for [Abija] Abiah Edwards in right of Mrs Sarah Roeppe, of Shrewsbury, widow executrix of William Reape, formerly of Rhode Island, deceased. Gave deed to Abiah Edwards, shipwright, for her right, title and interest in two hundred and forty acres of land, which had been surveyed for Henry Green in two lots, one in Shrewsbury, the other of seven acres, near Goose Neck. [6][7][8][9]

1682 Deed from Abiah Edwards to Henry Bull. Newport (Rhode Island), 24 November 1682. Witnesses: Thomas and Ammy Ward, Mary Billings. (2:98). [10]

No year date [Abijah] Abiah Edwards was listed for quit rent on long branch, Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, New Jersey on 15 January. 120 acres?, surveyed on behalf of Mrs Sarah Reape bounded by Mary Barns, Peter Easton, and Eliz Henton. [11]

1683 Abiah Edwards served on the jury of the Shrewsbury court. [12][13]

1683-84 [year not recorded] On 12 March, warrant to Hugh Dickman to arrest Abiah Edwards. On 18 March, Hugh Dickman was plaintiff against Abiah Edwards for detaining 7 pounds of Boston money. [14] Abiah Edwards denied the accusation and said the money was stolen from him. [15]

1683 4 March 1 Deed Lewis Mattoks of Shrewsberry to Abiah Edwards of the same place, shipwright, for all his right title etc in and to a lot adjoining grantee, SE a salt water creek, NE another 25 acres in a triangle, also 33 acres bought of Richard Hartshorn. [16]

1684 On May 15, widow Sarah Reap, of Shrewsberry, executrix of William Reap, formerly of Rhode Island, deceased, to Abiah Edwards, shipwright, for her right, title, and interest, in and to the land, surveyed for Henry Green of Shrewsberry in two lots, one, 233 acres bounded SE by Thomas Barnes' children, John Williams and Nathaniel Cammick, SW town land, NW Peter Easton of Rhoad Island, NE grantee, formerly Lewis Mattock; the other, 7 acres, near Goose Neck, NE Saltwater Creek and Joseph Parker, SE Nathaniel Cammick, SW grantor, NW Lewis Mattock. [17][18]

1685 On the 22 day of 5 month (July), Robert Turner of Philadelphia, merchant, to Abaiah Edwards of Shrewsbury, shipwright, for 1-64 of ½ of 1-12 share of the Province of East Jersey. [19]

1685 Abiah Edwards paid quit rent on 300 acres in Shrewsbury Twp, Monmouth Co. [20]

1687 Abiah Edwards was witness to a deed with American Indians. "The following (synopsis of an) Indian deed, and believed to be the only one that has been handed down, was found among the papers of Jacob Spicer, and is now in the possession of Charles Ludlani, Esq.. of Dennisville. "It was given January 1st, 1687, by Panktoe to John Dennis, for a tract of land near Cape Island, viz.: 'Beginning from the creek and so running up into the woodland, along by Carman's line to a white oak tree, at the head of the swamp, and running with marked trees to a white oak by a pond joining to Jonathan Pine's bounds. All the lands and marsh lying and between the bounds above mentioned and Cape Island. The witnesses were Abiah Edwards and John Carman. Panktoe's mark bore a striking resemblance to a Chinese character." [21][22]

1688 Abiah Edwards ran the sloop "Desire" between Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, New Jersey and New York. [23]

1688 Robert Ashley brought a court case against Abia Edwards. [24]

1689 On 29 March, Benjamin Devall brought a court case against Abia Edwards. [25]

1689 On 18 December, Abiah Edwards made an entry of goods from New Jersey in the sloop Desire, from West Jersey and Neversink, to the governor of New York [Leisler]. [26] "Abia Edwards from West Jersey in the Sloop Desire enters vizt. 24 Barrells, 1 chest, 1 Trunke. From Neversincks Vizt. 25 Barrells, 4 Firkins [small cask one quarter the size of a barrel], 1000 weight Tallow or thereabouts, 2 Baggs Peltry, 1 Notace of Beeswax, and some few trifles for Provision etc. Sworne Abiah Edwards" [27]

1691 In September, Abiah [Abia] Edwards was a grand juror at Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, New Jersey. [28][29]

1694 The estate of Lewis Mattox in Shrewsbury, Monmouth Co, included property on Goose Neck, town of Shrewsbury adjoining Sarah Reep, the highway and Abia Edwards. [30]

1694 Abiah Edwards owned land south-east of land of Thomas Hilborn of Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, New Jersey. [31]

1695 On 20 February, Warrant [East Jersey]. For M. Chambers "Widdow". Bordering lands of S. Reape; and O. Edwards. 7 Acres. Shrewsberry. [32]

c 1696 "Obiah Edwards" was on the quit rent role for 120 acres in Shrewsbury Twp, Monmouth County, New Jersey. [33]

1696 June 23 Patent to Mary Chambers of Shrewsberry, widow, for 60 acres there between a branch of Shrewsberry R, Portapeck Neck, Lewis Mattock, Sarah Reap, John Williams, Isaac and Mary Barnes; 5 acres of meadow on Goose Neck, adjacent to NE John Worthlie, SE Abiah Edwards, SW a ditch to the river, NW South or Shrewsberry River. [34]

1697 Abiah Edwards owned land north-west of land, near Sarah Reape and Goose Neck, of John Williams of Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, New Jersey. [35]

1697 There were burglaries of board the sloop Desire. "Presentments by the grand jury against Hendrick Paulus for burglary on board the sloop Desire, Obediah Edwards master, also on board the sloop Sun, Edw Webley master, he has broken out of jail". [36] Perhaps "Obediah" is an error for Abiah.

1697 Abiah Edwards owned land, in Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, New Jersey, south-west of land that spinsters Susannah and Mary Barnes of N.Y. City, heiresses to Thomas Barnes of Shrewsbury, had sold to John Stewart. [37]

1698 Abiah [Abia] Edwards witnessed the will of Thomas Webley of Shrewsbury, Monmouth Co. Daughter Catherine was named (perhaps the future wife of Philip, the son of Abiah Edwards). Inventory, including an estate in Wales and an estate from his uncle Edward Webley (perhaps named as another ship master in the 1697 burglary note), made by Nicholas Brown. [38]

1700 On 27 August, Abiah Edwards served on the grand jury, in Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, that indicted several people for their participation in a riot against the sheriff and robbery. [39][40]

1700 Oct 15 Deed. Mary Chambers, of Shrewsbury, widow, to her son Richard Chambers of the same place, cooper, for a lot there on the Southside of the branch of Shrewsbury River, running N of Potapeck Neck, adjoining John Williams, Isaac Ong, and Mary Barns; 5 acres of meadow on Goose Neck, NE John Worthlie, SE Abiah Edwards, SW a ditch. [41]

1700 On 30 October, Mary Brown, widow and sole executrix of the estate of John Brown, late of Middletown, Monmouth County, New Jersey assigned friend John Stuart as her attorney. Signed by Mary Brown with witnesses Abiah Edwards, Elizabeth Stewart. [42]

1700-01 March 10. Deed. John Stewart of Shrewsbury, yeoman, and wife Elizabeth to Joseph Wing of the same place, yeoman, for: 1) 140 acres, SW John Williams and Abiah Edwards, SE a brook, NE Lewis Mattock and unsurveyed land, NW said Mattock and a small creek; 2) 44 acres, NW a road, NE Nathaniel Cammock, SE a creek, SW Thomas Barnes alias Walter Harbert; 3) 2 acres, SW grantor, NE Isaac Ong, SE a creek, NW a road, all in Shrewsbury Township. [43]

1701 On 20 June, Warrant [East Jersey]. To O. Edwards."117 3/16 acres adjoyning to the Land he Lives on […] in full of his first and second Division". 117.2 Acres. [Probably near Shrewsbury]. [44]

1701 Aug 28. Deed to Abiah Edwards of Shrewsberry, ship wright, in full of his first and second dividend as one of the Proprietors, of 118 acres in Monmouth County adjoining grantee, formerly belonging to Sarah Reap. [45] Survey [East Jersey]. For A. Edwards "in Right of [1/64th] part of a proprietie". Bordering lands "he bought of Mrs. Sarah Reap". [Survey undated. Years approx.] [Warrant Date: 20 Dec 1700]. 118 Acres. [Unrecorded, probably Shrewsbury]. [46]

1708 Abiah [Ubiah] Edwards witnessed the marriage of George Williams and Joanna Bills at the Quaker Meeting House in Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, New Jersey. [47]

1710 Abia Edwards witnessed the will of Nathaniel Cammick of Shrewsbury, Monmouth County. [48]

1714 Abiah Edwards and wife Elizabeth conveyed land to John West. In this deed it is stated that Edwards was a shipwright. [49]

1714-5 The will of yeoman Abiah Edwards, of Shrewsbury, Monmouth Co, was dated January 17. Wife Elizabeth. Children: Philipp, Naomi, wife of John Curies, who has James and John, Elizabeth Brown, who has daughter Mary [Naomi] Brown. Home farm, bought of Sarah Reape. Personal property (4 negro slaves). Executors: the wife and son. Witnesses: Cornelius Tomson, Elizabeth Tomson, William Madock. Proved February 24, 1714-5. [50][51][52] Edited transcription: Abiah Edwards of Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, "Yeoman, being very Weak of Body." Dated Jan. 17, 1714. Proved by oath of Cornelius Tomfon, wit., before Thomas Gordon, Esqr, Surrogate, Feb. 24, 1714. Gives: "unto my Well Beloved Son Phillip Edwards All that ... Land and Meadow which I Bought of Sarah Reap Scituate ... in Shrewsbury ... together with all ... Appurtenances ... him his Heirs "... my Said son allowing ... that my Dearly Beloved Wife Elizabeth Edwards Shall Live, remain ... "on And have her Maintenance for and During her Natural Life out of the said ... Land and Meadow; unto my "Said Son Phillip All my Negroe Servants that are at home that is ... Margery Nan and Ando ..."; "unto "my Daughter Naomi Curlis Wife of John Curlis my Negroe Girl Called Patience"; "unto my Daughter Elizabeth Brown "the Sum of Ten Pounds Current ... Money of ... Province ... if demanded"; "unto my Grand Daughter Naomi Brown Five Shillings Current ... Money"; "unto my Grandsons James and John Curlis Five Shillings Each Lawful Money ..." Constitutes "my Dearly Beloved Wife Elizabeth Edwards and my Well Beloved Son Phillip Edwards the Executrix "& Executor ..." Abiah Edwards. Witnesses: Cornelius Tomsons, Elizabeth Tomson, Wm Madock. Oath of Executor, Philipp Edwards, before Thomas Gordon, Esqr, Surrogate, Feb. 24, 1714. [53]

1714-15 On January 27, the inventory of the personal estate of Abiah Edwards was taken by Jno. and Geo. Williams and Stephen Coluen in Monmouth County, New Jersey. [54]

Research Notes:

Daughter Elizabeth Edwards Brown and grand-daughter Naomi Brown were named in the will of Abiah Edwards. Neomi Brown married James Killgore in 1830, but nothing more is known of her. Daughter Elizabeth may have been married to Preserve Brown or to his brother, Nicholas Brown [55] Stillwell hypothesizes that Elizabeth Edwards was the wife of Preserve's brother Nicholas [56]. Preserve Brown had several descendants named Abiah. There is no record of a daughter Naomi born to Preserve Brown, nor to Nicholas and Elizabeth Brown. Link to our Genealogy Page for Preserve Brown, at this website.

"the vessel called the "Desire of Barnstable," which brought the goods of Mr. Leverich to Oyster Bay, belonged to the said Samuel Mayo, and was commanded by John Dickerson, probably a brother of Philemon, of Southold. She was seized in Hempstead Harbor, by one Thomas Baxter, under pretence of authority from Rhode Island, while cruising against the Dutch, that province having taken part with England in the war against Holland, and the vessel being, as was alleged, within the Dutch territory. The commissioners of the United Colonies interfered, to procure a restoration, and sent a deputation to Governor Easton of Rhode Island for that purpose. He denied the right of Baxter to make the capture, but the owner engaging to prosecute the offender in the courts of law, the matter was dropped. The Dutch authorities protested against what they called an invasion of this territory, and an infraction of the treaty of Hartford, which the English denied, and the matter being considered of little importance, the settlers were left unmolested." [57]

"Samuel Mayo was a remarkably enterprising fellow. He owned the good ship Desire, of Barnstable, and in it carried the adventurers and their goods and possessions to Oyster Bay. He seems to have been the business man of the enterprise and looked after the affairs of the colony, apportioning its plantations or farms to those new comers who proved agreeable to the town meeting. But he had not always smooth sailing in the carrying on of his enterprises. Being engaged to convey the goods of Mr Leverich to Oyster Bay, his vessel was seized in Hempstead Harbor, by one Thomas Baxter, under the pretense of authority from those in charge of affairs in Rhode Island. Thompson says that this Baxter was beyond all question a turbulent and unprincipled fellow, and the general court at Hartford censured him for his reproachful speeches against that jurisdiction and imposed a fine upon him. He was also obliged to reimburse Mayo for seizing his vessel under false pretenses Mayo died at Oyster Bay in 1670." [58]

1739 On 21 January, Jeremy Irons of Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, sold 40 acres of land on Barnagat Beach in Shrewsbury, to Beriah Goddard of Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. The property was bordered by the sea and north by land of Abiah Edwards part of which tract was conveyed to Beriah Goddard by a deed from his honored father-in-law Stephen West of said Dartmouth dated 29 October 1738, and the other part he (Beriah Goddard) was empowered to sell by all the daughters of the said Stephen West by their power of attorney to Beriah Goddard ... [59]

1767 Land from the estate of Abijah Edwards was considered by the New Jersey Board of Proprieters. The lands were in the Eastern Division, except Romopock and in Monmouth or Middlesex Counties on the south side of Raritan River in full view of the other half the second. Mr Bland as attorney to Priscilla Bland and John and Mercy Mann laid before the board a state of 1/3 of 1/2  and of 1/3 of 7/80 and of 1/24 they claim under Thomas Hart. The president (James Parker) and the vice president declared themselves interested in this claim. The claims of John Alexander and George Alexander were delivered. [60]

Abijah Edwards (died c 1715) Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, farmer, held 1/126 of a propriety, was the father of Philip (1683-1739). [61]

1793 Perhaps related to son Phillip is an intestate settlement from the Orphans' Court in Monmouth County, New Jersey, dated Jan 1793: "A division of the real estate owned by Philip Edwards, deceased, as requested by his son John Edwards, identified his heirs. Children and heirs: Abiah Edwards, oldest son; John Edwards, son; Daniel Edwards; Joseph Edwards; Stephen Edwards; James Edwards; Sarah Edwards; Abigail Edwards; and Deborah Edwards. [62]

1827 The siblings of Deborah Fisher, deceased, petitioned for a division of the real estate owned by the deceased that was situated in the county of Monmouth. Deborah Fisher, late Deborah Edwards, late of New York City, died intestate owning a house and lot in Shrewsbury Twp [NJ]. They and the children of Daniel Edwards deceased were her heirs. Her brothers Abijah [transcribed as Abigail] Edwards, Joseph Edwards, James Edwards, Stephen Edwards, and John Edwards. Her sisters: Sarah Cook, wife of Samuel Cook, and Abigail Cook, wife of William Cook. Children of Daniel Edwards, deceased: William T Edwards, Joseph Edwards, Stephen Edwards, Henry Edwards, Eliza Edwards, and James H.L.H. Edwards. [63]

The following records suggest that Abiah Edwards was involved in a case related to a bastard son by Mary Sutton. Some of the crumbling pages of the records have missing parts, so the text is incomplete.

1689 On 25 June, Att a court of Common Please…Middletown [Monmouth County, New Jersey] 25 June 1689. Court heard cases of: The King against Benjamin Devall by his attorney James Emott re: the forfeiture of a bond which was for the maintenance of a bastard child; Devall’s attorney was Samuell Leonard. The Jury called John Worthley and upon his evidence…Obiah Edwards [blank] for the maintenance of the child of Mary Sutton. Joseph Hick did declare…That Obiah Edwards did send to ye house of the said Worthley for ye said child by them the said Joseph, Ephraim Potter & Richard James, they did demand ye child from John Worthley, the said John Worthley’s wife would not let it go because the mother of the said child was not at home. [64][65] Jonathan, the son of Mary Sutton was named as the son of Abiah Edwards upon his marriage to Isabel Lewis in 1718 [66]. "Whereas Jonathan Edwards of ye Township of Notingham in Ye County of Chester and Province of Pennsylvania, Cooper, Son of Abiah Edwards of Shrewsbury in East Jersey, in Ye government of New York, ship carpenter, Deceased, & Isabell Lewis of ye above said Township & County, daughter of David Lewis, Deceased, Having declared their Intentions of Taking Each other In Marriage before Severall Monthly Meetings of ye People of God Called Quakers. In ye above said Township & County according to ye good order Used among them. Whose proceedings Therein after A Deliberate Consideration thereof were approved of by ye Said Meetings they appearing clear of others, and having consent of Parents and relations concerned. Now These are to certifie all whom it May Concern that for ye full Accomplishing their Said Intentions this Twenty Second day of ye third Month In ye year According to The English Account one Thousand Seven hundred & Eighteen, they ye Said Jonathan Edwards & Isabell Lewis Appeared in publick assembly of ye Said people & others Mett together for ye End & Purpose In their publick meeting place att Notingham in ye abovesaid Township & County & according to ye example of ye holy men of God  recorded in The Scriptures of truth In a Solemn Manner he ye Said Jonathan Edwards taking ye Said Isabell Lewis by ye hand, did openly Declare ye in ye presence of ye Lord he took ye Said Isabel Lewis to be his wife promising through ye Lord’s assistance to be a loving husband unto her untill it should please him by death to separate them. And then & there in ye said assembly ye Said, Isabell Lewis did in like Manner take ye Jonathan Edwards to be her husband promising through ye Lord’s assistance to be a loving wife unto him untill it should please God by death to Separate or words to ye effect, & ye Said Jonathan Edwards & Isabel Lewis as a farther confirmation did then & there to these presents Set their hands & we whose names are Hereunto Subscribed being present amongst others att ye solemnizing of their marriage & subscription in maner aforesaid as witnesses thereunto, have also to these presents subscribed our names ye day & year above written." [http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/EDWARDS/1999-04/0923687780]

1690 On 28 March, William Hullett and Mary Sutton appeared before me and the abovesaid…[both took each other]…to be … wedded…till death part them; [signed – Peter Tilton.][67][68]

1696 On 23 September, Mary Sutton's son was apprenticed. "Upon application of John Hance Esqr on ye behalf of John Worthley…Town of Shrewsbury…yeoman concerning one Jonathan Maryson, base son of Mary Sutton the said Jonathan being now nine years of age which said Jonathan Maryson, the said John Worthley hath maintained & bred up from his infancie and doth humbly desire this Court that ye said Jonathan Maryson may be bound an apprentice unto him the said John Worthley… Judgement of ye Court is…Jonathan Maryson…shall serve the said John Worthley…after the manner of apprentice from the day of the date hereof until he shall be of the age of Twenty one yeares; he ye said Worthley shall find and allow his said apprentice sufficient meat, drink, aparrell, washing & Lodging during his said time, and at ye expiration of the said time to give and allow his said apprentice as is usuall in ye said province. [69][70]

An undocumented report suggests that Abiah Edwards married an Indian maiden by the name of Neomy Elizabeth, who was of the Shinnecock Nation, living on what was known in those days as Shinnecock Island. Abiah and Neomy became the parents of several more children: Philip, Neomy and Elizabeth. [https://sites.google.com/site/edwardsfootprints/family-calendar/family-origins-p-2/Abiah-Edwards]

Presbyterians "came in 1829 with the Reverend Job Edwards as pastor. Parson Job, whom his descendants claim as kin to Abiah Edwards, the shipwright of Shrewsbury, was a remarkable man ..." [71]

Footnotes:

[1] Robert Charles Anderson, George Freeman Sanborn, Melinde Lutz Sanborn, Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume 3 (G-H) (Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999 ongoing), 60, citing Suffolk County Probate Records 7:80, see also #565, 7:48,77.

[2] Samuel Eliot Morison, ed., Records of the Suffolk County Court, 1671-1680, Vol. 1 (1933), 25, citing Court Session of 31 October, 1671.

[3] Samuel Eliot Morison, ed., Records of the Suffolk County Court, 1671-1680, Vol. 1 (1933), 280, citing Court Session of 29 July, 1673. S.F. 1245.9.

[4] New Jersey State Archives, Colonial Land Surveys and Warrants, 1670-1727 (online database), Liber II, Part 2: Folio 125 [PEASJ003], [NJ_State_Archives].

[5] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 60, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[6] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 50, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[7] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 378, describes Reape properties in Weymouth, Dorset, England, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[8] USGenWeb Monmouth Will Abstracts, [Link].

[9] Edward Peterson, History of Rhode Island and Newport (New York: John S. Taylor, 1853), 122, lists Reape property in Monmouth County, New Jersey, [Google Book].

[10] "Tables of Contents to the Land and Notarial Records of Rhode Island, collection in the Secretary of State's Office, Archives Division, State House, Providence, R.I.," Rhode Island Roots 13 (1987), 27-33, at 33.

[11] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. 2 (1906), 373, [Internet Archive].

[12] Monmouth County, New Jersey deed book B-11

[13] Edwin Salter, A History of Monmouth and Ocean Counties (1890), 25, [Google Book].

[14] Monmouth County, New Jersey deed book B-14

[15] Monmouth County, New Jersey deed book B-17

[16] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 329, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[17] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 329, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[18] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. 3 (1914), 230, [Internet Archive].

[19] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 329, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[20] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. 2 (1906), 405, [Internet Archive].

[21] Lewis Townsend Stevens. The history of Cape May County, New Jersey. (1897), 12

[22] Frank H Stewart, Indians of southern New Jersey (Kennikat Press, 1972), 79, [Google Book].

[23] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. 3 (1914), 230, [Internet Archive].

[24] Monmouth County, New Jersey deed book B-65

[25] Monmouth County, New Jersey deed book B-71

[26] Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, ed., Calendar of historical manuscripts in the office of the secretary of state, Albany, N.Y. Part II, English (1865), 174, [Internet Archive].

[27] Peter R. Christoph, ed., The Leisler Papers, 1689-1691 (The New York Historical manuscript Series, 36, Syracuse University Press, 2002), 27.

[28] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. 3 (1914), 230, [Internet Archive].

[29] Edwin Salter and George C Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth (1887, Reprinted 1999 by Heritage Books, ISBN 0-7884-1228-0), 253.

[30] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 311, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[31] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 214, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[32] New Jersey State Archives, Colonial Land Surveys and Warrants, 1670-1727 (online database), citing O: Folio 150 [PEASJ003], [NJ_State_Archives].

[33] Orra Eugene Monnette, First Settlers of ye Plantations of Piscataway and Woodbridge, Olde East New Jersey, Part One (Los Angeles: Leroy Carman Press, 1930), 60, [Google Book], [Google Book].

[34] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 245, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[35] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 242, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[36] New York State Library, Bulletin 58, (April 1901-March, 1902), 122, citing Calendar of Council Minutes, Vol 7, 1693- 1697 (April, 1697), reversed side 24

[37] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 313, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[38] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 497, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[39] William A. Whitehead, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 2. (Administration 1687-1703) (1881), 332, documents suggest that the case reflected differences between Scottish, English, and Dutch settlers, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[40] Edwin Salter and George C Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth (1887, Reprinted 1999 by Heritage Books, ISBN 0-7884-1228-0), 261.

[41] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 329, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[42] Monmouth County, New Jersey deed book D-99

[43] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 329, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[44] New Jersey State Archives, Colonial Land Surveys and Warrants, 1670-1727 (online database), citing O: Folio 192 [PEASJ003], [NJ_State_Archives].

[45] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 21. (Patents and Deeds, 1664-1703) (1899), 332, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[46] New Jersey State Archives, Colonial Land Surveys and Warrants, 1670-1727 (online database), citing O: Folio 207 [PEASJ003], [NJ_State_Archives].

[47] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. 1 (1903), 256, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[48] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 80, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

[49] Edwin Salter, A History of Monmouth and Ocean Counties (1890), 25, [Google Book].

[50] William Nelson, Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. Archives Vol. 23. (Wills and Administrations 1, 1670-1730) (1901), 148, citing Lib. I, p. 521, [Google Book], [Internet Archive].

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[52] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. 3 (1914), 474, indicates correction from Mary to Naomi, [Internet Archive].

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[57] Charles Werner and Benjamin F. Thompson, History of Long Island, 3rd edition, Vol. 3 (1918), 63, [Internet Archive].

[58] Peter Ross and William Smith Pelletreau, A History of Long Island, Vol. 2 (1905), 129, [Google Book].

[59] James W Hook, Smith, Grant, and Irons families of New Jersey's shore counties: including the related families of Willets and Birdsall (1955), 199, [Google Book].

[60] Maxine N. Lurie and Joanne R. Walroth, ed., The Minutes of the Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey from 1764 to 1794, Vol. 4 (Newark, New Jersey: New Jersey Historical Society, 1985), 55, of 55-57, [HathiTrust].

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[62] Judith B Cronk, Intestates and Others from the Orphans' Court Books of Monmouth Co, NJ 1785-1906 (2002), 4, [Google Book].

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[64] Monmouth County New Jersey Deed B-74

[65] Richard S. Hutchinson, Monmouth County New Jersey, Deeds Books A, B, C and D (2000), 61.

[66] Family History microfilm #0020465, New Garden Monthly Meeting of Quakers

[67] Monmouth County, New Jersey Deed book B-87

[68] Richard S. Hutchinson, Monmouth County New Jersey, Deeds Books A, B, C and D (2000), 63.

[69] Monmouth County, New Jersey Deed C-151

[70] Richard S. Hutchinson, Monmouth County New Jersey, Deeds Books A, B, C and D (2000), 94.

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