Janet and Robert Wolfe Genealogy --- Go to Genealogy Page for John Rivir --- Go to Genealogy Page for Nancy Stoner

Notes for John Rivir and Nancy Stoner

1809 John Rivir was born on 1st January 1809 in Bedford County, Pennsylvania [1] to John Rivir and Mary Winebrenner.

1809 Nancy Stoner was born in Donegal Twp, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, October the 26th, 1808 to Christian Stoner and Mary Ebersole. Photocopy,  Bible of John and Nancy's son Christian S Rivir with their birthdates in red writing at top and bottom of page.

1813 John Rivir's father, John Rivir, died in the War of 1812 and was buried on Bass Island, Ohio. Photocopy,  Bible of John Rivir's son, Christian Stoner Rivir, documents John's death in 1813 and John's service in the War of 1812 (at bottom of page).

1820 John Rivir's mother, Mary Rivir [Rivor], age 26 to 45 lived in Woodbury Twp, Bedford County, Pennsylvania with 1 male (John's brother Christian Rivir?) and 3 females age 1 to 10 (likely sisters of John, whose names are not known)[2]. The whereabouts of 11 year old John Rivir at this time has not been determined; perhaps he was living in another household. The households of Abraham Sr, John, Abraham Jr, and Jacob Stoner, who are Nancy Stoner's uncles and grandpa, were also in Woodbury Twp. Nancy Stoner's father Christopher Stoner lived in Donegal Twp, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

1830 Nancy Stoner lived in Lancaster County with her father, Christian Stoner [3]. Nancy Stoner's grandmother, aunts, and uncles lived in Woodbury Twp, Bedford County, where the Rivirs lived in 1820. No census record has been found for John Rivir. John Rivir's mother, Mary, might have died or might have remarried and they might be living with her new husband. Some researchers indicate that widow Mary Winebrenner Rivir married Andrew Hay [4].

183x Nancy Stoner moved with her parents from Lancaster County to Bedford County, the same county where John Rivir lived.

1831 Story,  A fictional account of the meeting of Nancy Stoner and John Rivir, 1831.

1832 Nancy Stoner and John Rivir were married. A notice on Friday May 11 1832 in the Lancaster Journal newspaper reported: "On Thursday, the 12th inst. by Alexander W. Kenny, Esq [an attorney in Bedford County]. Mr. John Rivir to Miss Nancy Stoner, daughter of Mr. Christian Stoner, late of Lancaster co. and now of Morrison's Cove." On May 3 1832, the Lancaster Examiner" newspaper carried the same notice [5]Photocopy,  Front page 1832 date of newspaper with Nancy Stoner and John Rivir's marriage announcement in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Photocopy,  Newspaper announcement of Nancy Stoner and John Rivir's marriage in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 1832.

1833 A report in the Bedford Gazette newspaper announced the marriage of Nancy Stoner's brother Jacob Stoner to Mary Cowen of Bedford County.

1835 John River was listed in the tax rolls for Woodberry Twp, Bedford County, Pennsylvania with 118 acres of land, 2 horses and 2 cattle. [6]

1840 John Rivir (age 30-40) lived with Nancy (age 20-30) in North Woodbury, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. Male children were two age 0 to 5 (Jacob and John) and one age 5-10 (Christian) and a daughter age 5-10 (?). On the same page was Nancy's father Christian Stoner and wife (age 50-60 with children male age 20-30 and age 10-15 and female age 15-20). [7]

1845 John and Nancy Rivir and family moved to Indiana.

1846 John Rivir was stricken with malaria, dengue, and ague, as were all but one of the children.

1850 John Rivir (age 40), farmer with estate valued at $500, Nancy (age 40), Christian (age 16), John (age 16), Jacob (age 11), David (age 9), Mary (age 7), Eli (age 5), and Elizabeth (age 2) lived in Noble Twp, Noble County, Indiana. All children were born in Pennsylvania but Elizabeth who was born in Indiana. Next door was Nancy's brother, Jacob (age 37) and Mary (age 38) Stoner. Their ages and places of birth suggest they moved from Pennsylvania to Indiana in about 1845. [8]

1853 On 30 January, Christian Stoner died in West Providence, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. Christian Stoner willed his property to be divided between his beloved wife Margaret and his son Christian. Letters were sent in February to Nancy River and Jacob Stoner of Noble County, Indiana notifying them of probate proceedings to be held in March. [9]

1855 John and his wife Nancy Rivir and Jacob Stoner and his wife Polly, all of Union County, Indiana, appeared in Bedford County, Pennsylvania to sign a deed conveying two tracts of land in Bedford Co to Christian E Stoner Jr, of Bedford Co, for $10. The tracts had been conveyed to Christian Stoner, the father of Jacob E Stoner and Nancy River, by deed dated May 13 1842, by William McDaniel (deed is faint and is hard to read). [10]

1855 John Rivir bought 80 acres in Green Twp, Noble County, Indiana and started to harvest timber with his sons. John Rivir again became sick, and could not walk, but worked by riding a horse to haul logs.

1860 John Rivir (age 52) and wife Nancy (age 52) lived in Green Twp, Noble County, Indiana with children John (age 24), Jacob (age 21), Mary (age 17), Eli (age 15), Elizabeth (age 12), and Nancy (age 8). Nearby was Nancy's brother Jacob Stoner (age 48) and Polly (age 51) and children. [11]

1861 John Rivir was hurt badly when he was thrown from a wagon in an accident at Port Mitchell on Lake Mitchell, Noble County.

186x The map of Noble County by E.B. Gerber showed land of John Rivir [River] in southwest section 1 of Noble Twp. Christian River owned land in section 7 of Green Twp, just north of the lake that would be named Rivir Lake on subsequent maps. Conrad Nicodemus (possibly a relative of Nancy Stoner, who had an uncle Nicodemus in Pennsylvania) and several Winebrenner (possibly related to future in-laws through daughter Elizabeth) families own land in section 13 and 24 of Noble Twp, land which would later be owned by John Rivir. According to the biography, below, John Rivir sold the land in Green Twp before 1861, so this map might be based on land ownership in the late 1850s. Christian River owned 80 acres in section 24 of Noble Twp. John River owned 80 acres in section 18 of Green Twp. Map,  John Rivir's land was shown in section 1 on an 186? map of Noble-Green Townships, Noble County, Indiana. [12]

1864 Three of John and Nancy Rivir's sons and 2 nephews (Christian and David, sons of Nancy Stoner Rivir's brother Jacob Stoner) enlisted in the Civil war in General Sherman's and Grant's armies on their march through the South. [13][14] Christian Stoner was the only one to survive. A newspaper clipping in the bible of Christian S Rivir, John and Nancy's son, gives the following account: "River - Jacob, son of John and nancy River, died January 15th, 1862, at Nashville, Tennessee, after being in the service about four months, aged 23 years, 7 months, and 8 days. A sermon was preached by the writer in reference to his death, near the place of his residence, to many relatives and neighbors. Also, David, son of the same parents, died December 17th, 1862, at Bowling Green, Kentucky, having been in the service of the country some four months aged 21 years, ten months, and 25 days; and the writer was again called upon to preach a sermon to the memory of the departed one to an attentive collection of relatives and friends. John, also son of the above named parents, was taken prisoner while in the service, September 1, 1864, and has not been heard of since, and no doubt he was one of that number who perished by the cruel hands of traitors, in the prison at Andersonville. He was aged, when taken prisoner, 28 years, 5 months, and 16 days. This unfortunate brother served his country for nearly three years, during which time he went through many severe battles, and then died in the most revolting manner." Photocopy,  Reports of the deaths of John and Nancy Rivir's sons in the Civil War from the bible of John's son Christian S Rivir.

1870 John River, farmer (age 62), and wife Nancy (age 63) lived in Noble, Noble County, Indiana, with $6,000 real estate and $750 individual estate. Household members included: Nancy (age 18); grand-daughter Malissa (age 9) living with grandparents, born Indiana; and son Christian, carpenter (age 36, born Pennsylvania)[15]. Two houses away, was the household of son Eli Rivir (age 24)[16]. A descendant of Melissa reports that John's son Christian was her father. [17]

1874 The home of John Rivir was in north section 24 of Noble Township and he had land in section 19 of Green Township [18]. The Green Twp, Noble County, Indiana landowners atlas shows J Rivir, likely John or one of his sons. The Nichodemus family near John Rivir's land was a possible cousin of Nancy Stoner's through her aunt Ann Stoner. Photocopy,  1874 map with John Rivir's land in sections 13 and 24 in Noble (gold) and in 7 and 19 (Henry Hosler) in Green (colored green) Townships.

1874 The Lake on John Rivir's land was identified as Rivir Lake. [19][20] The name had changed to Bristol Lake in an 1939 atlas [21]. The Rivir Lake in Green County in the Chain of Lakes Park maintains the Rivir name, likely named for John's brother Christian, who had a home on the lake. [22]

1880 John Rivir (age 70) was a retired farmer living in Noble, Noble County, Indiana, with wife Nancy (age 70) and daughter Nancy (age 27). Brother Christian Rivir (age 66) was in a nearby listing. [23]

1886 Nancy Stoner Rivir died. 

Nancy's death was recorded in the bible of John and Nancy's son Christian S Rivir (identified as "Mother" in red at bottom of page), 1886. 1893 A land plat of Noble County shows several plots of land for John, son Eli, and Nancy Rivir and for J.A., Henry, and Malissa Baughman near Rivir Lake in the Chain of Lakes area. [24] 1895 John Rivir died on 10 Aug and was buried at Christian Chapel, Noble County, Indiana. Photocopy, John Rivir's death was recorded in the Bible of John and Nancy's son Christian S Rivir (identified as "Father" in red at bottom of page), 1895. John and Nancy Rivir were buried at the Meriam Christian Chapel Cemetery in Noble Couty, Indiana:

Gravestone of John Rivir, Christian Chapel Cemetery, Indiana. [25]

Gravestone of Nancy Stoner Rivir, Christian Cemetery, Indiana. [26] A Biographical sketch reports: "John Rivir [River] who died at his home in Noble township, August 10, 1895, aged eighty-six years, eight months and nine days, was a native of Bedford county, Penn., and was born on the 1st of January, 1809. He married Nancy Stoner, a Pennsylvania girl, a native of Lancaster, born October 26, 1810. They commenced their married life in their native state and remained there until 1845, when they came to Noble County with a family of children, the youngest of whom was an infant of a few months. They had $18 to start with, six young children to support and no land of their own. It is well for us to meditate, somewhat, on this phase in the life of John Rivir, remembering that the condition was not entirely exceptional, but was the lot of many settlers at that time. Unquestionably his was an extreme case on account of the size of his family. We must conclude that the first winter, with six helpless children, was a time to try the Souls and test the physical powers of husband and wife. It needs no stretch of imagination to comprehend a multitude of details of suffering and privations, over some of which it were no weakness if loyal memory should at one moment, but only for a moment, shed some tears, and the next moment yield to an uncontrollable impulse to hurrah for the heroism that carried them safely through, It is pardonable, I trust, to make the contemplation of every one of these typical cases an occasion for recognition of the real glory of Noble County's pioneer age. If it seems a little monotonous, sometimes, it may be that the fauIt is in our defective visions. A cloudless Sunset sky to-day may seem to the indifferent observer the same as all preceding ones, but it is not. Each differs from all predecessors in some of its hues and tints and shadings, presenting a Succession of new aspects and effects which a thousand years of sunsets would not exhaust. The next spring Mr. River planted for a crop of corn. The next fall while putting in wheat he was attacked by malaria in an aggravated form of fever and ague, and was confined to his bed during the entire fall and winter for six months, and all the children except one were stricken down during that time. Mrs. River and one boy only being able to keep their feet. How did they get through this second winter, so much worse than the first? There was but one way, They had to depend for life itself, upon the sympathy and generous aid of neighbors, of scant means themselves but great hearts; the noble pioneers who would divide their last crust with a suffering fellow-being and heal the breaking heart with genuine fraternal ministrations, so pure and spontaneous, that it seemed a blessed privilege, a holy joy instead of a charitable duty. Call those times and those men and women rough, uncouth, offensively primitive? No! Rather in the noblest respects, it was our heroic age, glowing with spiritual glory and redolent of sweetest grace and charm. And we all recognize it in the rare moments when we can turn away from the brilliancy and somewhat Superficial pomp of outward refinement and external etiquette and contemplate the time and the people when genuine worth and kindness were recognized in all their essential grace and beauty, without artificial formulas of manner and expression. Ten years after their settlement here Mr. River bought eighty acres of land in Green township, and commenced there in the timber. His boys had grown, his forces were augmented, but sickness came again and sapped the strength of his sons and reduced him to such weakness that he was unable to keep upon his feet. But the work of clearing must go on, and he rode and guided a horse to haul together and roll up the logs, the boys doing the hitching and adjusting, and piling the poles and brush. In 1861 at the age of fifty-two years, he was thrown from a wagon and received injuries that crippled him for the remainder of his life. Prior to this accident he had sold his Green township farm and was about to remove to Kansas; but the breaking Out of the war of the Rebellion changed his plans and he purchased the farm in Noble township, where he died, Three of his sons, John, Jacob and David, lost their lives in the service of their country during the rebellion, one of them, John, starving to death in Libby prison. Mr. River was an active worker in the cause of the Christian religion and a prominent member of the Christian church society, These salient points in his life of fifty years in Noble coumty will serve to illustrate the arduous labors and formidable obstacles and discouragements incident to the work of clearing the ground and laying the foundations of the noble superstructure of civilization; the indomitable spirit that overcame and conquered. John River's career was honorable and successful, for himself and for his country." [27] 1895 Obituary for Noble County: "John Rivir, who died at his home in Noble Twp Aug. 10, 1895, aged 86 years, 8 months and 9 days, was a native of Bedford County, Penn., born there on the first day of Jan. 1809. He married Nancy Stoner, a Penn. girl, native of Lancaster, born Oct. 26, 1810. They commenced their married life in their native state and remained there until 1845 when they came to Noble County with a family of children, the youngest of whom was an infant of a few months. They had $18 to start with, 6 young children to support and no land of their own. In 1861 at the age of 52 he was thrown from a wagon and received injuries that crippled him for life. Prior to the accident he had sold his Green Twp farm and was about to remove to Kansas, but the breaking out of the War of the Rebellion changed his plans and he purchased the farm in Noble Twp where he died. Three of his sons, John, Jacob and David, lost their lives in the War, John starving to death in Libby Prison." [28] 1895 Obituary for Noble County: "John Rivir was born on New Year's Day of 1809 in Bedford County, Penn. His wife, Nancy (Stoner) Rivir, was born October 26, 1810 in Lancaster, Penn. Mr. Rivir came to this county in 1845 when he had but $18, with a large family to support. He put in a crop of corn the next spring; the next fall while engaged in putting in wheat he was taken sick and confined to his bed six months. At one time the entire family, excepting Mrs. Rivir and one boy, were down sick, but they were assisted by the neighbors through the winter. In 1855 Mr. Rivir bought eighty acres of land in Green Township. He commenced there in the timber; his family were again taken sick. While rolling together the logs for a clearing he was so weak he could not walk; but to assist the boys he would ride a horse and the boys would hitch to the logs and do the other necessary work. In 1861 he sold his farm with a purpose to emigrate to Kansas or Missouri, but the war coming on, he changed his plans and bought the land where he now lives. In 1861, on the day that his son Christian Rivir was married, he met with an accident that has rendered him unable to work. While at the mill at Port Mitchell he was thrown out of the wagon and received injuries which came near resulting fatally. Mr. Rivir lost three sons in the army - John, Jacob and David. John was starved in Libby Prison. The fourth son enlisted but was under age and released. Mr. Rivir is a Republican and a leading member of the Christian Church. Noble Twp. [29][30][31] c1890

John and Nancy Stoner Rivir. 1906

1906 Rivir reunion with names. Many of the descendants of John and Nancy Rivir had a reunion.

Footnotes:

[1] Family Document, Bible of son Christian Rivir, in the care of Pen North.

[2] FamilySearch.org, US census, 1820, Son John is not matched by a male, [FamilySearch_Record].

[3] FamilySearch.org, US census, 1830, [FamilySearch_Record].

[4] US census, 1830, John Rivir not found

[5] F. Edward Wright, Marriages and Deaths from the Newspapers of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania 1831-1840, Vol. 1 (2009), 14, [Google Book].

[6] Family History Library microfilm, 1449112, [FHL_Film_Catalog].

[7] FamilySearch.org, US census, 1840, line 5, [FamilySearch_Record].

[8] US census, 1850, Reel 0162, Image 483, family 72, [Internet Archive].

[9] Bedford County Pennsylvania Will D-99, [FamilySearch_Image].

[10] Bedford County, Pennsylvania Deed AR-156.

[11] US census, 1860, Reel 285, Image 59, family 370, [Internet Archive].

[12] Edward Mendel, Map of Noble County, Indiana (E.B. Gerber, 1860?), [Library_Congress].

[13] CJWhan, Noble County, Indiana, Records from the Whan Collection (Web-based: Noble County Public Library), Noble County veterans, 88th Indiana Infantry, [Noble_County_Library].

[14] Pennsylvania State Archives, Civil War Veterans' Card File, Search in the alphabetical range of names that includes "River", [Link].

[15] US census, 1870, Reel 0347, Image 393, family 70, [Internet Archive].

[16] US census, 1870, Reel 0347, Image 393, family 68, [Internet Archive].

[17] CJWhan, Noble County, Indiana, Records from the Whan Collection (Web-based: Noble County Public Library), Noble County marriage record abstracts, [Noble_County_Library].

[18] SW & PA Durant, Illustrated Historical Atlas of Noble County Indiana (Andreas and Baskin, 1874), 30, [Internet Archive].

[19] SW & PA Durant, Illustrated Historical Atlas of Noble County Indiana (Andreas and Baskin, 1874), 30, [Internet Archive].

[20] Rollie A Coil and Samuel Cleland, Complete Survey and Atlas of Noble County Indiana (1914).

[21] Atlas and Directory of Noble County, Indiana (Elmhurst, Illinois: Friendly Map and Publishing, 1939), 23.

[22] Chain of Lakes Park near the Rivir home in Indiana, [Link].

[23] US census, 1880, Reel 0302, Image 222, family 33, [Internet Archive].

[24] Oliver Morrow, Plat book and statistical record of Noble County, Indiana (Madison, Wisconsin: Western Pub. Co., 1893), [Library_Congress].

[25] Find A Grave Memorial 25652265, [Find_A_Grave].

[26] Find A Grave Memorial 25652273, [Find_A_Grave].

[27] Samuel E. Alvord, Alvord's History of Noble County, Indiana (Logansport, Indiana: 1902), 88, [Internet Archive].

[28] CJWhan, Noble County, Indiana, Records from the Whan Collection (Web-based: Noble County Public Library), Noble County obituaries, [Noble_County_Library].

[29] Weston Arthur Goodspeed and Charles Blanchard, Counties of Whitley and Noble Indiana Historical and Biographical (Chicago: Battey & Co, 1882), 463, [Internet Archive].

[30] Counties of LaGrange and Noble, Indiana: Historical and Biographical (Chicago: Battey & Co, 1882), 463, [Google Book].

[31] CJWhan, Noble County, Indiana, Records from the Whan Collection (Web-based: Noble County Public Library), Noble County biographies, [Noble_County_Library].


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