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Tuesday, January 18, 2005

King's Message Still Valid a Day After His 76th Birthday

They must see Americans as strange liberators... They watch as we poison their water, as we kill a million acres of their crops. They must weep as the bulldozers roar through their areas preparing to destroy the precious trees. They wander into the hospitals, with at least twenty casualties from American firepower for one "insurgent"-inflicted injury. So far we may have killed a million of them -- mostly children. They wander into the towns and see thousands of the children, homeless, without clothes, running in packs on the streets like animals. They see the children, degraded by our soldiers as they beg for food.
-- Dr. Martin Luther King, quoted by Bob Harris

Okay, I changed the word "Vietcong" to "insurgent." Unfortunately, probably nothing else in the paragraph needs changing to apply it to Iraq--especially if the whole sordid fifteen-year Gulf War/sanctions/"Iraqi Freedom" history is included (or even worse, extend it to include the Iran-Iraq war when Carter and Brzezinski encouraged Saddam to invade Iran, and then Reagan and Bush Sr. proceeded to arm both sides).

Bob Harris quotes extensively from King's 1967 speech, and points out how Dr. King's anti-war speeches and activities tend to be completely forgotten during the MLK Day commemorations. So, a reminder:
There is at the outset a very obvious and almost facile connection between the war in Vietnam and the struggle I, and others, have been waging in America. A few years ago there was a shining moment in that struggle. It seemed as if there was a real promise of hope for the poor -- both black and white -- through the poverty program. There were experiments, hopes, new beginnings. Then came the buildup in Vietnam and I watched the program broken and eviscerated as if it were some idle political plaything of a society gone mad on war, and I knew that America would never invest the necessary funds or energies in rehabilitation of its poor so long as adventures like Vietnam continued to draw men and skills and money like some demonic destructive suction tube...

As I have walked among the desperate, rejected and angry... I have told them that Molotov cocktails and rifles would not solve their problems. I have tried to offer them my deepest compassion while maintaining my conviction that social change comes most meaningfully through nonviolent action. But they asked -- and rightly so -- what about Vietnam? They asked if our own nation wasn't using massive doses of violence to solve its problems, to bring about the changes it wanted. Their questions hit home, and I knew that I could never again raise my voice against the violence of the oppressed in the ghettos without having first spoken clearly to the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today -- my own government. For the sake of those boys, for the sake of this government, for the sake of hundreds of thousands trembling under our violence, I cannot be silent...

... I cannot forget that the Nobel Prize for Peace was also a commission -- a commission to work harder than I had ever worked before for "the brotherhood of man." This is a calling that takes me beyond national allegiances, but even if it were not present I would yet have to live with the meaning of my commitment to the ministry of Jesus Christ. To me the relationship of this ministry to the making of peace is so obvious that I sometimes marvel at those who ask me why I am speaking against the war...