A Memory from the Colorado Plateau

Watercolor by Craig Welch, 2007.

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Records from:
The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 4DU.

America and the West Indies, Transportation to, 1615-1776

Piece details E 134/5&6Anne/Hil26

Context : quick reference
E Records of the Exchequer, and its related bodies, with those of the Office of First Fruits and Tenths, and the Court of Augmentations
Division within E Records of the King's Remembrancer
E 134 Exchequer: King's Remembrancer: Depositions taken by Commission
Subseries within E 134 Anne

Record Summary Scope and content John Parker and his wife Sarah, Joseph Whitchurch and his wife Dulsibella, Benjn Dendy, Eliz. Dendy, Thos. Dendy, Frances Dendy, Martha Dendy, and Wm. Dendy (which said Thomas, Francis, Martha, and William are infants under the age of one-and-twenty years) by William Hickcocks their "p'cheine amy." v. Isaac Holford: Estate of James Dendy, of which defendant is executor. Touching bonds entered into by James Dendy, deceased, and Isaac Holford, to the use of Thos. Hunt, of Hackney (Middlesex), merchant, for payment to him of one thousand pounds, and other bonds from same parties, to the use of Sir Charles Hara, of the parish of St. James, Westminster, to John Chiselin, of Stoke Newington (Middlesex), James Whitchurch, of London, merchant, and Hopefor Bendall, of London, merchant, &c., &c.: London; Middlesex.
Covering dates 5 & 6 Anne
Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years
Held by The National Archives, Kew

Piece details PROB 20/724

Context : quick reference
PROB Records of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury
Division within PROB Wills and Letters of Administration
PROB 20 Supplementary Wills Series I

Record Summary
Scope and content Dendy, James: HMS Colchester
Covering dates c.1703
Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years
Held by The National Archives, Kew

Item details PROB 18/28/3

Context : quick reference
PROB Records of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury
Division within PROB Litigation Records
PROB 18 Prerogative Court of Canterbury: Allegations
PROB 18/28 Descibed at item level

Record Summary
Scope and content Probate lawsuit Whitchurch and others v Holford, concerning the deceased James Dendy. Allegation and 2 interrogatories
Covering dates 1705
Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years
Held by The National Archives, Kew


*** End 13th and Beginning 14th Century ***

Record Summary
Scope and content William Dendy of Swallowfield (Swafeld) to Maud late the wife of Robert de Swafeld, clerk, brother and heir of the grantor: Quitclaim of land, etc., in Banbury Wykham (in Bodicote) and Overthorpe (Cothrop): Oxford. (N'hamp.) Berks.
Covering dates 12 Edw. II
Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years
Held by The National Archives, Kew


FILE - [no title] - ref. BCM/G/4/6/5 - date: [1319]
Contents
Robert de Craunford and Maud his sister. 25 Aug. 13 Edw. II
Robert has granted to Maud widow of Robert de Swafeld, for her life, a rent of 20s. a year from his manor of Newenton Juwel, and is bound to her in 10, paid at her house in Banneburi, not to disturb her tenure. Witnesses: Ralph de Preawes, Sir Walter de Burencestre, William de Orton, Thomas de Pakynton of Brailes, John the miller of Newington.
At: Banbury.

[Here I will insert a note regarding the ties of the Cranford family to Scotland in the 13th century:

  • Robert de Swafeld, the brother and heir of William Dendy of Swallowfield (1319 deed to Maud, widow of Robert) is the brother-in-law of Robert de Craunford (Cranford). Robert de Craunford is the lord of the manor of Newington Jewel and Robert de Swafeld serves as clerk and witiness on several land aquisition documents (1309) for Robert de Craunford. Now, regarding the relationship of the Cranfords to Scotland, the family of Cranford served as clerks to Roger, a son of the third earl of Leicester and the bishop-elect of St. Andrews in 1189. See the quote in the next paragraph from the Norman Shead's article in The Scottish Historical Review of October 2007 ("Compassed About with so Great a Cloud: The Witnesses of Scottish Episcopal Acta Before ca 1250" Volume LXXXVI, 2 No. 222: Oct 2007, 159-175).

    (p.172) "The arrival of Roger, a son of the third earl of Leicester, as bishop-elect of St. Andrews in 1189 not surprisingly introduced several men from England into the diocese... Geoffrey Cranford and William de Wiville came from the household of the earls of Leicester, though the latter's surname suggests an origin in Lincolnshire. Cranford witnessed charters of Earl Robert IV, Bishop Roger's brother, and of countess Petronilla. These men were perhaps the sons of Roger de Cranfort and another William de Wiville of Earl Robert II's time."

    The close family relationship of Robert de Swafeld (brother of William Dendy) and Robert de Craunford provides the opportunity for a connection to Scotland in the family history of Robert de Swafeld, given the importance of the Cranfords in the households of the earls of Leicester and in the diocese of St. Andrews in the 13th century.


  • "THE CRANFORD INHERITANCE BCM/G/4 [n.d.]

    These documents are held at Berkeley Castle Muniments

    Administrative history: South Newington was the principal manor of the Cranford family in the 14th century. By 1206 the manor was held by William (I) de Paris, who c. 1212 granted an estate in South Newington to Ralph Ivaus (or Loas, Juas, Jueus, Ives, Sowas) in marriage with his daughter Helewise. Helewise's brother William (II) de Paris died without issue, and in 1255 his lands were divided between his surviving sister Maud de Wyke, and his nephew Ralph (II) Ivaus. Nicholas de Cranford, a canon of Wells, and his nephew Robert acquired a substantial proportion of the inheritance, in particular South Newington. In 1259 Ralph Ivaus and his wife Agnes granted the reversion of property in South Newington to Nicholas de Cranford, but Ralph also granted all his holdings there direct to Robert, in order to have Nicholas's good will: below, BCM/G/4/6/4 [GC 2523]. Ralph died without issue in 1272 when the heir to his portion of the Paris lands (of which he had sold part) was his aunt Maud de Wyke. Maud also sold some of her brother's lands to Nicholas de Cranford, specifically his lands in Dorset and a rent of 4s. in Blackford (Som.), but she retained the lands at 'Stokes' (Som.), Cassington (Oxon.) and in Buckinghamshire. Robert de Cranford died in 1302 and was succeeded by his son and heir, Robert (II), who died in 1339 holding the manor of South Newington and leaving a widow Joan and a son Robert."


  • Robert (II) de Cranford inherits in 1302 the manor of South Newington (a.k.a. "Newenton Juwel") from his father Robert (I). In 1303 we discover that Robert de Swafeld is living in Banbury by a writ of debt issued against him:

  • Record Summary
    Scope and content Debtor: Philip de Swayfield {Swafelde}, staying in Nettleham [Lawress Wapentake], Lincs., and Robert de Swayfield, staying in Banbury, Oxon.
    Creditor: John de Foderby {Fotterby}, the Elder [of Lincs]
    Amount: 40.
    Before whom: Stephen de Stanham, Mayor of Lincoln; Adam Fitz-Martin, Clerk.
    First term: 12/03/1303
    Last term: 06/04/1303
    Writ to: Sheriff of Lincs. & Oxon
    Sent by: Stephen de Stanham, Mayor of Lincoln; Adam Fitz-Martin, Clerk.
    Covering dates 1303 Aug 5
    Availability Open Document, Open Description, Open on Transfer
    Held by The National Archives, Kew


  • We can most likey conclude that Philip de Swayfield is some family relation to Robert de Swayfield since a debt of 40 pounds in 1303 is the equivalent of several thousand pounds of today. Also, we can safely assume that the debt for Robert was acquired in Lincoln since the creditor is in Lincoln and the village of Nettleham is only about 3 miles from Lincoln.

    From the history provided by the Berkeley Castle, "William (II) de Paris died without issue, and in 1255 his lands were divided between his surviving sister Maud de Wyke, and his nephew Ralph (II) Ivaus... Nicholas de Cranford, a canon of Wells, and his nephew Robert acquired a substantial proportion of the inheritance, in particular South Newington. In 1259 Ralph Ivaus and his wife Agnes granted the reversion of property in South Newington to Nicholas de Cranford, but Ralph also granted all his holdings there direct to Robert, in order to have Nicholas's good will. Ralph died without issue in 1272 when the heir to his portion of the Paris lands (of which he had sold part) was his aunt Maud de Wyke."

    A note on the geography of Banbury-Wykham: according to the Berkeley Castle administrative history "Wyke Farm lay by the south gate of Oxford, but evidently west of the River Thames, as it was in Berkshire."

    The lands of Newington Jewel were in the possession of William (II) de Paris prior to 1255. We only learn of the Cranfords in the Berkeley Castle documents in 1259 when Nicholas de Cranford, a canon of Wells (diocese) acquires "a substantial proportion of the inheritance." However, from the article in The Scottish Historical Review, we learn about the family of Cranford much earlier: in the 12th century they are members of the household of the earls of Leicaster and figuring prominently in the household of Roger, a son of the 3rd earl of Leicaster and bishop-elect of the diocese of St. Andrews in Scotland.

  • Robert de Swafeld and his brother William Dendy of Swafeld: property, inheritance, and family ties to Cranfords.

    "William Dendy of Swallowfield (Swafeld) to Maud late the wife of Robert de Swafeld, clerk, brother and heir of the grantor: Quitclaim of land, etc., in Banbury Wykham..."

    The date of this grant of land to Maud, the widow of Robert de Swafeld is 1319, (12 Edward II). We now know that land in Banbury Wykham falls into two neighboring counites: Oxfordshire and Berkshire. We also have discovered from the Berkeley Castle documents that Maud, the wife of Robert de Swafeld is the sister of Robert (II) de Cranford.

    There are two facts relating to the persons of Robert de Swafeld and William Dendy, his brother. Firstly, Robert de Swafeld, although having a writ of debt for a substantial amount in 1303, has good standing with the Cranfords such as to marry Maud, the sister of Robert de Cranford. The second fact is that in 1303 Robert de Swafeld is already living in Banbury after recently acquiring a debt with Philip in Lincoln; and, upon his death in 1319 William Dendy, Robert de Swafeld's brother, owns the Banbury land where Robert de Swafeld and wife Maud have been living. Who is William and how is it that he owns the land that he gives to Maud by quitclaim? Why is there such a strong family bond between Robert de Swafeld and the powerful family of Cranfords? It is not property nor is it material wealth. It might be Scotland. There is among South Carolina Dendys the long held family tradition that the Dendys originated in Scotland. The Dendys are clearly English at the time of the South Carolina colony but the origin of the family may have its beginning in 13th century Scotland and a family alliance with the powerful ecclesiastical family of 13th century clerks and canons of St. Andrews in Scotland and Wells in England.]

Image details

Description Petitioners: Cecily le Conestable (Constable), wife of Roger le Costable of North Walsham.
Name(s): Conestable (Constable), Cecily
Addressees: King and council
Nature of request: Conestable complains of William Green and others that they came by force and arms to North Walsham at Monday next before the feast of the Ascension in the eight year of the king's reign, and assaulted and wounded her husband, killed his brother and maimed Hugh le Constable and they are unable to have a remedy. She requests grace and remedy be granted to her at Yarmouth the Monday next after the feast of St Scholastica.
Nature of endorsement: [None]
Places mentioned: North Walsham, Norfolk; Gernemut (Great Yarmouth), [Norfolk]
People mentioned: William Grene (Green); Ellis Grene (Green); Geoffrey Grene (Green); Thomas Littester; John Neweman (Newman) the younger; William [Eylesun], son of Richard Eylesun; Robert Seyne; John Noreys (Norris); Clement Dende; William Dende; Robert de Sperham; John [Agathe], son of Roger Agathe; Clement Manger; John Baldeman; Roger le Conestable (Constable), husband of the petitioner; Richard le Conestable (Constable), brother of Roger le Constable; Hugh le Conestable (Constable).
Date derivation: The petition refers to the assault occurring on Monday 28 April 1315. The petition must date to soon after this.

Date 1315
Catalogue reference SC 8/40/1978
Dept Records of various departments, arranged artificially according to type, and formerly entitled Special Collections
Series Special Collections: Ancient Petitions
Piece 1951-2000. Individual petitions are described and dated at Item level.
Image contains 1 item for the catalogue reference

See a transcription of the Norman French content of the Cecily le Conestable petition.



Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: G
Reginald R. Sharpe (editor), 1905
Pages 238-248
Citation: 'Folios ccxxi - ccxxx: Feb 1368-9

Folio ccxxiv.

Ordinacio wyndrawer'.

16 April, 43 Edward III. [A.D. 1369], the following winedrawers (wyndrawerii) came before Simon de Mordone, the Mayor, William Haldene, the Recorder, Adam Fraunceys, John Wrothe, John Stodeye, Stephen Cavendisshe, William Welde, Bartholomew Frestlynge, Richard Croydone, John Chichestre, John Bernes, John Tornegold, James Andreu, and William Walworth, Aldermen, viz., John Bright, master, John William, "wyndrawere," Gilbert Dantre, Hubert Chelsham, Benedict Dreu, William Philpot, Robert de Ynde, Robert Pursere, William Holm, John "Maisterion" Lightfot, and John Salkyn, his fellows; also John Croydone, master, and John Cook, Nicholas Netlam, Henry Mustone, John Bysshopesgate, and Ralph Hulle, his fellows; also John Feversham, master, and Roger Straunge, John de Prestone, John Ferour, Robert de Bisshopesgate, Thomas de Chestre, John Langele, John Elys, John Westm[inster ?], William Og, and Stephen de Dende, his fellows; and they were sworn to faithfully serve the commons and not to take more than the fees prescribed. (fn. 10) Further, they were forbidden to handle any wine-cask unless twelve associates were present.


The surname of Dendy evolved in the 2nd half of the 13th century and the beginning of the 14th near the coast of the east midlands of England in Lincolnshire and the North Norfolk District, in the wool trade towns of Swafield and Walsham. Dendy derived from a place name as we see in 1369 in Stephen de Dende and resembles the first Provost of Dundee in 1286, Radulfo, Magister de Dundee. In the 1298 City Charter of Dundee granted by Sir William Wallace (Walays) the Latin text spells the city name Dunde. In the petition of Cecily le Conestable in 1315 we encounter Clement Dende and William Dende. In William's 1318 grant of land in Banbury to his brother's widow, the name takes the form it will keep through the 16th century and on to the present time as Dendy.

In regard to the spelling of the city name Dunde in early 14th century petitions and manuscripts, the name has variants from scribe to scribe on a phonetic basis of spelling. This makes an exact derivation of a name from the city difficult. The city name of Dundee is Scottish Gaelic in origin and its rendering in Norman French is only approximate when spelled by phonetics. In the image below are freehand renderings from three different petitions naming Dundee and Perth (Town of St. John of Perth). The names of the petitioner and the date of the petition are shown along with the literal transcription for the word for Dundee City. In a 1406 petition from Scotland to the Bishop of Durham, the spelling is as the modern form: Dundee.



It is worth noting that the appearance of the surname Dende in the area of the east coastal wool town of North Walsham in 1315 corresponds in time to the recapture of the royal castle of Roxburgh (Rokesburg) by the Scots in 1313 in their fight for independence. As an indication of the complete disruption of life on land and sea during the conflict between Scotland and England from the invasion of Berwick in 1296 through the entire period of Edward II, a petition of 1307 from Galloway, describes poignantly the destruction by Robert de Bruce of lands near to and on both sides of the border to prevent an invading English force from obtaining food and resources: SC 8/48/2387 "The petitioner [John de Geueleston of Galloway] seeks expenses for his service to the king's father in his campaign in Galloway and compensation for the destruction of his lands and property by Bruce, and that the king's enemies should be driven from his country. The petitioner incurred costs of 100 and more in the service of the king's father in Galloway, which costs were intended to be paid by the lord of Perth now dead. Bruce has invaded his lands and burned and destroyed his goods worth more than 300, and now since the departure of the king his lands are in close proximity to the parts of Scotland and Bruce has burned and destroyed his corn and his house worth more than 100."

The borough of Kings Lynn (very near the town of North Walsham): "Letters Patent of Exemplication of Letters Patent, dated at Westminster by Henry IV. on the 25th of November in the 14th year of his reign" (i.e. 1413) the following entry is recorded in manuscripts of King's Lynn:

". . . We the Mayor and Potentiores for our part and We the Mediocres and the Inferiores not burgesses for our part and the whole community of the town of Lenn ... on the part of the Potentiores, Edmund Belleyetere, Thomas Waterden, John Wintworth, Thomas Brygge, Robert Brunham, John Brandon, Ralph Bedyngham, William Hounderpound, James Brygge, Richard Thorp, Richard Dendy, John Wesenham, Bartholomew Systerne, Andrew Swanton, John Bolt, John Spicer, John Home, John Lakynghithe, Robert Salesbury, William Briccham, John Thoresby and Thomas Hunt have each been bound by themselves by their obligatory writing in the sum of one hundred pounds to the Mayor and community of Lenn aforesaid and their successors, ...Sealed with the common seal of the town of Lenn, and dated 15 Dec., 13 Henry IV." Dendys are clearly well established and prosperous in the location of King's Lynn which is south of Boston and Stamford and near the east midlands coast of the North Sea.

As a postscript to Dendys in Lynn, 282 years later, Thomas Dendy in 1695 purchased property from ancient lands connected to Castle Rising, near the town of Lynn. This has in part the appearance of a commercial venture since Thomas immediately sells in 1695 and leases to sell in 1696 two of the three parcels of property; he retains the third parcel until its sale in 1708:

Norfolk Record Office

Howard of Castle Rising Collection

Deeds How 66 - 68 340 x 4 1695 - 1721

Contents: Deeds of burgage or burgages, with barns, stables, orchards &c., sold by Augustine Bulwere to Thomas Dendy in 1695 and leased for term of 21 years by Dendy to Thomas Howard Esq. in 1696. In 1708 one burgage was sold by Dendy to Stephen Allen gent. who leased for term of 31 years to the Hon. William and Lady Diana Fielding. In 1721 Stephen son of Stephen Allen sold to Charles Brockwell. Inc. declarations of trust in favour of the Fieldings, 1708, 1721, and unexecuted lease to them from Brockwell, 1721. The residue, a piece of arable ground, site of an ancient burgage, was sold by Dendy to Stephen Sheppard in 1695 and leased for term of 31 years by Sheppard to Thomas Howard Esq. in 1696. In 1721 it was conveyed by the Hon. William Fielding to John Skynner gent. and then leased for term of 99 years by Skynner to the Fieldings. Inc. declaration of trust in favour of the Fieldings, 1721

*** The End of an Era by Mid 14th Century ***

Instrument CCA-DCc-ChAnt/O/129 13 Apr 1363
1 document
Parchment, 1m, seal, dirty, stained
Related information: Notarial exemplification: CCA-DCc-ChAnt/O/130A Registered version: CCA-DCc-Register/B, ff366r-366v
Contents: From: Simon Islip, archbishop of Canterbury The archbishop, with the consent and licence of King Edward III, has built and founded a hall of scholars in the university of Oxford in a place which he has provided at his own cost, which he has caused to be ordained for 12 scholars. As part of its maintenance, he grants the college 8 houses, which he acquired specially at great cost to himself, near the place he has assigned for the scholars to live. He has also arranged for the manor of Woodford [Northamptonshire] in Lincoln diocese, belonging to his nephew William de Islep', to be assigned to the college. The archbishop has founded the college because many men learned and skillled in all knowledge have been lost in past plagues and at present very few insist on the study of letters because of lack of maintenance ('defectum exhibicionis'). Given at Mayfield [Sussex]. Endorsed with description, as 'Tenor fundacionis' of the college, in 15th cent hand.


The English Dendy Family in the 16th Century.
  • 1.
    REQ Records of the Court of Requests
    REQ 2 Court of Requests: Pleadings
    Subseries within REQ 2 HENRY VII - HENRY VIII
    REQ 2/5 1-406, described at item level

    Record Summary
    Scope and content William and George Dendy, sons and executors of Thomas Dendy, yeoman, late of Ewhurst, Surrey v John Smalpeece, Mayor of Guildford, son and executor of Thomas Smalpeece, clothier, late of Guildford, Surrey: estate of Thomas Smalpeece, deceased.
    [Standard surname: Smallpiece]
    JMP
    Covering dates Between 1492 and 1547
    Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years
    Held by The National Archives, Kew

  • 2.
    C Records created, acquired, and inherited by Chancery, and also of the Wardrobe, Royal Household, Exchequer and various commissions
    Division within C Records of Equity Side: the Six Clerks
    C 1 Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office: Early Proceedings, Richard II to Philip and Mary
    C 1/622 Detailed description at item level

    Record Summary
    Scope and content John Chamber, dean, and the canons of St. Stephen's, Westminster. v. John Dendy of Ewhurst, yeoman, and Richard Hole.: Breach of promise not to fell wood in Little Hewyke, granted to complainants in compensation for non-delivery of timber, for which theyhad paid. Subpoena and injunction.: Surrey.
    Covering dates 1529-1532
    Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years
    Held by The National Archives, Kew

  • 3.
    C Records created, acquired, and inherited by Chancery, and also of the Wardrobe, Royal Household, Exchequer and various commissions
    Division within C Records of Equity Side: the Six Clerks
    C 1 Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office: Early Proceedings, Richard II to Philip and Mary
    C 1/699 Detailed description at item level

    Record Summary
    Scope and content John Chamber, dean of St. Stephen's, Westminster, and the canons there. v. John Dendy of Ewhurst, yeoman, Richard Hole and William Parke.: Breach of covenant to deliver `seasonyd tymber of oke' for which the said Dendy was paid, and grant by him to the other defendants of the right to fell timber in Little Heywyke wood, notwithstanding a prior grant thereof to complainant in recompense of the said breach. Subpoena and injunction.: Surrey.
    Covering dates 1532-1538
    Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years
    Held by The National Archives, Kew

  • 4.
    C Records created, acquired, and inherited by Chancery, and also of the Wardrobe, Royal Household, Exchequer and various commissions
    Division within C Records of Equity Side: the Six Clerks
    C 1 Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office: Early Proceedings, Richard II to Philip and Mary
    C 1/868 Chancery pleadings addressed to Sir Thomas Audley as Lord Chancellor. Detailed descriptions at item level

    Record Summary
    Scope and content John Pyke, feoffee to uses. v. John Dendy, William Melhersh, and others.: Detention of deeds relating to the manor of Conyhurst and a messuage called `Cobbettes,' in Ockley and Ewhurst, formerly of Richard Walssh, gentleman. Decree (faded) endorsed.: Surrey.
    Covering dates 1533-1538
    Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years
    Held by The National Archives, Kew

  • 5.
    REQ Records of the Court of Requests
    REQ 2 Court of Requests: Pleadings
    Subseries within REQ 2 HENRY VII - HENRY VIII
    REQ 2/9 1-191

    Record Summary
    Scope and content Richard Walshe v John Dendy of Ewhurst, Surrey: the manor of Conyhurst [in Ewhurst] and lands in Ockley, Ewhurst, and Abinger, Surrey. 4 mm.
    [Standard surname: Walsh]
    SMP
    Covering dates Between 1492 and 1547
    Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years
    Held by The National Archives, Kew


    C Records created, acquired, and inherited by Chancery, and also of the Wardrobe, Royal Household, Exchequer and various commissions
    Division within C Records of Equity Side: the Six Clerks
    C 1 Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office: Early Proceedings, Richard II to Philip and Mary
    C 1/593 Chancery pleadings addressed to Thomas Wolsey, Archbishop of York, Cardinal and Papal Legate as Lord Chancellor. Detailed descriptions at item level

    Record Summary
    Scope and content Richard Walsshe. v. John Dendy.: The manor of Conyhurst and land in Ewhurst and Ockley, excepting `Cobbats.' (Earlier bill of Dendy v. Walsshe not found.): Surrey.
    Covering dates 1518-1529
    Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years
    Held by The National Archives, Kew

  • 6.
    Bray family of Shere, Surrey
    Godschall family of Albury, Surrey
    Nicholas family of West Horsley, Surrey
    Bray, William, 1736-1832, historian


    FILE - Bargain and sale, with feoffment attached; Sir Edward Bray to John Dendy of Ewhurst, husbandman; Sares Croft, Ewhurst containing about 3a (boundaries given); Consideration: 8, and 1d pa - ref. G85/13/170/1-2 - date: 26 Aug-30 Aug 1552

    FILE - Bargain and sale; Sir Edward Bray of Cranleigh, to George Dendy of Ewhurst, yeoman; Cowpers in Ewhurst; Consideration: 40 - ref. G85/13/169 - date: 24 Aug 1552

    FILE - Bargain and sale; Sir Edward Bray, to Thomas Dendy of Ewhurst, ?husbandman; Richardales croft and Richardales Green, Ewhurst; Consideration: 12 - ref. G85/13/171 - date: 26 Aug 1552

    FILE - Bargain and sale; Sir Edward Bray to Nycholas Dendy of Ewhurst, husbandman; Close called Bakers, Ewhurst (boundaries given); Consideration: 12 - ref. G85/13/172 - date: 24 Aug 1552

  • 7.
    MORE, LATER MORE MOLYNEUX FAMILY OF LOSELEY PARK, GUILDFORD, LOOSE CORRESPONDENCE AND PAPERS, PART I LETTERS OF THE TIME OF SIR WILLIAM MORE (1520-1600)
    FILE - Letter from [Lady] Jane Bray, The Vachery [Cranleigh], to her nephew Thomas Browne, Betchworth Castle.... She asks his favour for the bearer, William Dendy of Ewhurst, who has been summoned before the justices of the peace at Guildford and may have to 'go forth as a soldier' although his aged father, who occupies 'more tillage and sowing of corn than two of the best in Ewhurst', depends upon his help.... She thinks this is due to the illwill of Sir Edward Bray, who is offended with the Dendys because they have bought timber from her.... The father's landlord, Mr Agmondesham, has also agreed to help. - ref. LM/COR/3/35 - date: 29 Jun 1563



The Rise and Fall of Edward Dendy.

John Milton and Edward Dendy as public servants under Oliver Cromwell ("John Milton Life, Work, and Thought" by Gordon Campbell and Thomas N. Corns, Oxford University Press, 2008, p.247): "The order books show that Milton's duties included searching for subversive papers. On 24 October 1649, he was ordered (together with Edward Dendy) to seize the papers of the dissident pamphleteer Clement Walker and prepare a report for the Council."

Deliverance from oppression often begets oppression.

Piece details E 320/Q16

E Records of the Exchequer, and its related bodies, with those of the Office of First Fruits and Tenths, and the Court of Augmentations
Division within E Records of the Court of Augmentations and the Augmentation Office
E 320 Trustees for Crown Lands and Fee Farm Rents: Particulars for Sale of Estates of Charles I
Subseries within E 320 SUFFOLK

Record Summary
Scope and content Eye honor and manor at Eye Hall or Priory: Edward Dendy
Covering dates 1649-1660
Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years Note ^ See also E 304 Held by The National Archives, Kew

Thursday, 7th of June, 1660.
Rights of Parliament.
Pardon and Oblivion.
Proceedings against the Regicides.


(House of Commons) Proceedings against the Regicides
The Examination of John Coke Esquire, taken before John Bysse, Recorder of Dublyn, the Eighth of May, 1660, was read.
Resolved, That John Coke Esquire be excepted out of this Act of general Pardon and Oblivion, for Life and Estate.
Resolved, That Andrew Broughton be excepted out of this Act of general Pardon and Oblivion, for Life and Estate.
Resolved, That Edward Dendy be excepted out of this Act of general Pardon and Oblivion, for Life and Estate.

Selected notes from one of the Regicides, Edmond Ludlow's 'Memoirs' vol. 2.



This is a postscript of miscellaneous information pertaining to Edward Dendy's escape from prosecution. Included are all reference data for this unusual but very informative document of 1902, apparently located at the University of Toronto:

"LIBRARY 728149 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

9 th S. X. JULY 5, 1902. NOTES AND QUERIES. CONTENTS. No. 236. ... 118 NOTES AND QUERIES. [9 th s. x. AUG. 9, 1902.

SERJEANT EDWARD DENDY (9 th S. ix. 508). This worthy was so appointed in 1621, vice Hamilton, under the Crown. In 1648 his services were transferred to Parliament, and so continued till 10 August, 1659, when he acted for the Privy Council only. In 1660 he petitioned for an appointment under the Customs at Bristol, but being prosecuted at the Restoration he escaped to Lausanne, where he appears to have been living till 1666. He had a father of the same name living at Wigan in 1659 ; and apparently a son named John, a sub-official at the Mint in 1648. This connexion with Wigan points to a Northern origin, and there was a family named Dande from Cheshire, who settled in Derbyshire and Notts from 1575 to 1670, from whom some Dendys of Sussex and Surrey claim descent. ABSENS."

  • Piece details C 3/54/64
    Record Summary Scope and content Dande v. Rose: Nottingham.
    Covering dates A.D. 1558-1579
    Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years Held by The National Archives, Kew

  • Piece details C 3/295/1
    Record Summary Scope and content Walker v. Dande: Nottingham.
    Covering dates A.D. 1596-1616
    Availability Open Document, Open Description, Normal Closure before FOI Act: 30 years Held by The National Archives, Kew

  • [no title] DD/FJ/5/5/10 29 June 1653
    These documents are held at Nottinghamshire Archives
    Language: Latin
    Contents: Writ of sub-poena to Godfrey Watkinson, sen., Godfrey Swifte, & Rich. Woodward, jun. To attend Derby Assizes on 18 July as witnesses in George Dande v. Francis Brigs & Rich. Stevenson.

  • The Dandy family name is equally ancient: William Dandy, clerk of Preston, two 1318 records.

    [no title] DDHE 25/26 (c. 1 Jun. 1318.)
    These documents are held at Lancashire Record Office
    Contents:
    Grant: William of Tylkyth of Longeton to Joan of the Kar and their heirs -- properties in Longeton -- Witn:...... Mallesone, John Hansome, Adam the Clerk of Longeton, William Dandy, clerk and others. Given at......... Ascension, 11 Ed. II. (Much faded.)

    [no title] DDX 900/84 1318 8 May
    These documents are held at Lancashire Record Office
    Language: Latin
    Contents
    (1) William Dandy, clerk, of Preston
    (2) Robert of Horewiche, Margerie, his daughter, and William Paulyn of Preston Feoffment of a certain burgage in Preston which (1) holds as a gift of the said Robert, in perpetuity. Warranty clause. Witnesses: Henry Banaster, Albrico son of Robert the bailiff of Preston, Adam of Bury, William son of Paul, William son of Nicholas, John son of Robert, Roger Award, Henry [?Cissover], Alexander Tyrel, William of Wygan and others Given at Preston, Monday on the morrow of St. John Beverlaco, 11 Edward II

    Considering the claim that Surrey Dendys are related to a Dande family in Cheshire, the above "gift of the said Robert, in perpetuity" of burgage (i.e. land within the borough of Preston) to this William Dandy in 1318 is a dovetail to the William Dendy of Swallowfield who, in 1319, gives his brother's widow claim to land in Banbury by quitclaim.

    On the website for the village of Hesketh Bank in Lancashire, the meaning of the village name is "Horse Track" from the Saxon words of the same meaning:

    Quoting this fact from Hesketh Bank's history page (see the above link), ":Hesketh comes from Hes + Skeidt - Viking and means Horse + Track. Which is basically 'Race track.'" Their website points out the fondness of Viking settlers for horse racing in the 10th century. In 18th century Virginia Colony, the Department of Transportation of Amelia County gives ample evidence of William Dandy's "Race Paths," thus linking Virginia history with Lancashire history in the evolution of horse race tracks in America.

    Heskaithe and Old Norse.

    [no title] DDHE 18/7 (25 Jul. 1294.)
    These documents are held at Lancashire Record Office
    Contents: Quitclaim: William son of Richard son of Margery of Harewode, to William of Heskaithe and Matilda his wife -- all properties in Great Harewode, called the Lepessagh -- Witn: Robert of Heppale, now steward, Henry of Blakes, John his son, Roger Nohel, Simon his brother, Robert of Holdene, William the Clerk, Adam of Aspdene, Gilbert of Riston, Richard of the same. Given at Harwode, St. James' Day, 22 Ed. I.

    From Old Norse ('An Introduction to Old Norse' by E.V.Gordon, 2nd edition revised by A.R.Taylor, Oxford Univ. Press):

    'skeith' n. course, running-ground, race.

    'hestr' m. stallion, horse.

    Thus 'hestr skeith' in Norse is hestrskeith becomes Hes'skeith, and Heskaithe.

    Great Harewode is at the east end of the valley of the River Ribble, Preston is at the west end.








Last edited June 21, 2009