VVT_papers.bib

@conference{Ashhab1998,
  author = {M. S. Ashhab and A. G. Stefanopoulou and J. A. Cook and M. Levin},
  title = {Camless Engine Cotrol for Robust Unthrottled Operation},
  booktitle = {Society of Automotive Engineers Special Publication Series SP-1346
	SAE981031},
  year = {1998},
  file = {papers_VVT/sae98.pdf},
  owner = {Admin},
  timestamp = {2009.12.09}
}
@article{Ashhab2000,
  author = {M.-S. S. Ashhab and A. G. Stefanopoulou and J. A. Cook and M. B.
	Levin},
  title = {Control-Oriented Model for Camless Intake Process---Part I},
  journal = {Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control},
  year = {2000},
  volume = {122},
  pages = {122-130},
  number = {1},
  doi = {10.1115/1.482447},
  file = {papers_VVT/rv2jmod.pdf},
  keywords = {internal combustion engines; control systems; controllers; actuators;
	valves; fuel optimal control},
  publisher = {ASME},
  url = {http://link.aip.org/link/?JDS/122/122/1}
}
@article{Ashhab2000a,
  author = {M.-S. S. Ashhab and A. G. Stefanopoulou and J. A. Cook and M. B.
	Levin},
  title = {Control of Camless Intake Process---Part II},
  journal = {Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control},
  year = {2000},
  volume = {122},
  pages = {131-139},
  number = {1},
  doi = {10.1115/1.482448},
  file = {papers_VVT/rv2jcon.pdf},
  keywords = {internal combustion engines; robust control; control systems; controllers;
	valves; adaptive control; fuel optimal control; feedback; feedforward;
	actuators},
  publisher = {ASME},
  url = {http://link.aip.org/link/?JDS/122/131/1}
}
@inproceedings{Ashhab1999,
  author = {M.-S. S. Ashhab and A. G. Stefanopoulou and J. A. Cook and M. B.
	Levin},
  title = {Control-Oriented Model for Camless Intake Process---Part I},
  booktitle = {International Mechanical Engineering Congress \& Exposition (!MECE),
	Dynamic Systems \& Control Division (DSCD) 1999, Proceedings of},
  year = {1999},
  pages = {179-186},
  file = {papers_VVT/imece_mod.pdf},
  owner = {Admin},
  timestamp = {2009.12.08}
}
@inproceedings{Ashhab1999a,
  author = {M.-S. S. Ashhab and A. G. Stefanopoulou and J. A. Cook and M. B.
	Levin},
  title = {Control of Camless Intake Process---Part II},
  booktitle = {International Mechanical Engineering Congress \& Exposition (!MECE),
	Dynamic Systems \& Control Division (DSCD) 1999, Proceedings of},
  year = {1999},
  pages = {187-194,},
  file = {papers_VVT/imece_con.pdf},
  owner = {Admin},
  timestamp = {2009.12.08}
}
@inproceedings{Hsieh1999,
  author = {Hsieh, S.C. and Freudenberg, J.S. and Stefanopoulou, A.G.},
  title = {Multivariable controller structure in a variable cam timing engine
	with electronic throttle and torque feedback},
  booktitle = {Control Applications, 1999. Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE International
	Conference on},
  year = {1999},
  volume = {1},
  pages = {465-470 vol. 1},
  abstract = {By adding an electronic throttle and a torque sensor to an engine
	equipped with variable cam timing (VCT), it is potentially possible
	to vary cam phasing to improve emissions and fuel economy while preserving
	the torque response of a conventional non-VCT engine. To do so effectively,
	however, requires the use of multivariable control. A controller
	consisting of decentralized individual control loops will not yield
	satisfactory performance because such a controller cannot compensate
	for system interactions. Yet, a fully multivariable controller may
	not prove necessary in order to achieve the desired performance.
	In this paper, we design linear multivariable controllers at a number
	of operating points and simplify the resulting controllers by eliminating
	cross-coupling terms that do not affect the closed loop response.
	Doing so provides insight useful in tuning controller parameters},
  doi = {10.1109/CCA.1999.806683},
  file = {papers_VVT/PM-05-5.pdf},
  keywords = {feedback, internal combustion engines, multivariable control systems,
	torque controlcam phasing, closed loop response, controller parameter
	tuning, conventional non-VCT engine, cross-coupling term elimination,
	electronic throttle, emissions economy, fuel economy, linear multivariable
	controller design, multivariable controller structure, system interaction
	compensation, torque feedback, torque response, variable cam timing
	engine}
}
@inproceedings{Hsieh1997,
  author = {Hsieh, S.C. and Stefanopoulou, A.G. and Freudenberg, J.S. and Butts,
	K.R.},
  title = {Emission and drivability tradeoffs in a variable cam timing SI engine
	with electronic throttle},
  booktitle = {American Control Conference, 1997. Proceedings of the 1997},
  year = {1997},
  volume = {1},
  pages = {284-288 vol.1},
  month = {Jun},
  abstract = {Tradeoffs between low feedgas emissions and smooth brake torque are
	discussed in the context of an engine equipped with variable camshaft
	timing (VCT). The use of VCT lowers the generation of feedgas emissions
	but adversely affects the torque response. However, with the addition
	of an electronic throttle and knowledge of online torque, the tradeoffs
	between emissions and drivability in the VCT engine can be lessened;
	conventional (nonVCT) engine torque response can be achieved while
	simultaneously preserving most of the emissions benefits gained by
	using VCT},
  doi = {10.1109/ACC.1997.611802},
  file = {papers_VVT/acc97.pdf},
  keywords = {air pollution control, internal combustion enginesVCT, drivability,
	electronic throttle, feedgas emissions, smooth brake torque, spark
	ignition engine, variable cam timing SI engine, variable camshaft
	timing}
}
@article{Jankovic1998,
  author = {Jankovic, M. and Frischmuth, F. and Stefanopoulou, A. and Cook, J.A.},
  title = {Torque management of engines with variable cam timing},
  journal = {Control Systems Magazine, IEEE},
  year = {1998},
  volume = {18},
  pages = {34-42},
  number = {5},
  month = {Oct},
  abstract = {This paper describe the variable cam timing (VCT) system which addresses
	both the drivability and emission performance by utilising an electric
	hydraulic mechanism to rotate the camshaft relative to the crankshaft
	in order to retard the cam timing with respect to the intake and
	exhaust strokes of the engine. By retarding the exhaust valve closing
	further into the intake stroke, more exhaust gas is drawn into the
	cylinder providing internal exhaust gas recirculation. In this manner,
	the amount of residual gas trapped in the cylinder at the end of
	the exhaust stroke is controlled by cam timing, suppressing NOx formation
	and reducing the pumping losses. Furthermore, this residual contains
	some unburned hydrocarbons; consequently, retaining it in the cylinder
	through two combustion cycles also reduces hydrocarbon emissions.
	In addition to the reduction of NOx and HC emissions, variable cam
	timing permits the engine designer to optimize cam timing over a
	wide range of engine operating conditions},
  doi = {10.1109/37.722251},
  issn = {0272-1708},
  keywords = {automobiles, combustion, compensation, internal combustion engines,
	timing, torque controlNOx emissions, automotive engines, cam timing,
	camshaft, combustion cycles, crankshaft, exhaust gas, hydrocarbon
	emissions, intake stroke, throttle compensator, torque management,
	variable cam timing}
}
@inproceedings{Stefanopoulou1995,
  author = {Stefanopoulou, A.G. and Cook, J.A. and Freudenberg, J.S. and Grizzle,
	J.W. and Haghgooie, M. and Szpak, P.S.},
  title = {Modeling and control of a spark ignition engine with variable cam
	timing},
  booktitle = {American Control Conference, 1995. Proceedings of the},
  year = {1995},
  volume = {4},
  pages = {2576-2581 vol.4},
  month = {Jun},
  abstract = {A control scheme is designed to minimize emissions and respond to
	rapid throttle changes in a fuel injected, spark ignition engine
	equipped with variable cam timing. The model is derived from engine
	mapping data for an eight cylinder experimental engine mounted in
	a dynamometer test cell; it is fundamentally a nonlinear and multivariable
	model. The control scheme jointly manages fuel and cam position},
  file = {papers_VVT/acc95.pdf},
  keywords = { automobiles, automotive electronics, electric ignition, internal
	combustion engines, mechanical engineering, timing cam position control,
	dynamometer test cell, emissions regulation, engine mapping, fuel
	control, modeling, multivariable model, nonlinear model, spark ignition
	engine, variable cam timing}
}
@article{Stefanopoulou2000,
  author = {Stefanopoulou, A.G. and Freudenberg, J.S. and Grizzle, J.W.},
  title = {Variable camshaft timing engine control},
  journal = {Control Systems Technology, IEEE Transactions on},
  year = {2000},
  volume = {8},
  pages = {23-34},
  number = {1},
  month = {Jan},
  abstract = {Retarding camshaft timing in an engine equipped with a dual equal
	camshaft timing phaser reduces the unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and
	oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emitted to the exhaust system. Apart from
	this positive effect to feedgas emissions, camshaft timing can cause
	large air-to-fuel ratio excursions if not coordinated with the fuel
	command. Large air-to-fuel ratio excursions can reduce the catalytic
	converter efficiency and effectively cancel the benefits of camshaft
	timing. The interaction between the camshaft timing and the air-to-fuel
	ratio results in an inherent tradeoff between reducing feedgas emissions
	and maintaining high catalytic converter efficiency. By designing
	and analyzing a decentralized and a multivariable controller, we
	describe the design limitation associated with the decentralized
	controller architecture and we demonstrate the mechanism by which
	the multivariable controller alleviates the limitation},
  doi = {10.1109/87.817689},
  file = {papers_VVT/vctCON.pdf},
  issn = {1063-6536},
  keywords = {air pollution control, control system analysis, control system synthesis,
	decentralised control, internal combustion engines, multivariable
	control systems, timingNO, air-to-fuel ratio excursions, catalytic
	converter efficiency, dual equal camshaft timing phaser, feedgas
	emissions, fuel command, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons,
	variable camshaft timing}
}
@inproceedings{Stefanopoulou1994,
  author = {Stefanopoulou, A.G. and Grizzle, J.W. and Freudenberg, J.S.},
  title = {Engine air-fuel ratio and torque control using secondary throttles
	},
  booktitle = {Decision and Control, 1994., Proceedings of the 33rd IEEE Conference
	on},
  year = {1994},
  volume = {3},
  pages = {2748-2753 vol.3},
  month = {Dec},
  abstract = {A control scheme is designed to limit air-fuel ratio excursions and
	track driver-demanded torque for a 4-cylinder engine during rapid
	changes in throttle position. The new control scheme is based on
	joint management of air and fuel flow into the cylinders using secondary
	throttles placed before the intake ports of the cylinders, in combination
	with standard fuel injectors},
  doi = {10.1109/CDC.1994.411385},
  file = {papers_VVT0/cdc94.pdf},
  keywords = { automobiles, internal combustion engines, torque control 4-cylinder
	engine, air flow management, air-fuel ratio excursion limitation,
	driver-demanded torque tracking, engine air-fuel ratio, fuel flow
	management, secondary throttles, standard fuel injectors, throttle
	position changes, torque control}
}
@article{Stefanopoulou1999b,
  author = {Stefanopoulou, A.G. and Kolmanovsky, I.},
  title = {Analysis and control of transient torque response in engines with
	internal exhaust gas recirculation},
  journal = {Control Systems Technology, IEEE Transactions on},
  year = {1999},
  volume = {7},
  pages = {555-566},
  number = {5},
  month = {Sep},
  abstract = {We analyze the nonlinear dynamic behavior of an internal exhaust gas
	recirculation system based on a mean-value model of an experimental
	automotive engine equipped with a camshaft phaser. We develop a control
	scheme that adjusts camshaft timing to reduce feed-gas emissions
	while maintaining transient engine torque response similar to that
	of a conventional engine with zero exhaust gas recirculation. The
	control scheme consists of a feedforward map that specifies desired
	camshaft timing as a function of throttle position and engine speed
	in steady state, and a first-order lag that governs the transition
	of the camshaft timing to the desired value. The time constant of
	the first-order lag is adjusted based on engine speed and throttle
	position},
  doi = {10.1109/87.784419},
  file = {papers_VVT/pz.pdf},
  issn = {1063-6536},
  keywords = {automobiles, internal combustion engines, poles and zeros, position
	control, torque control, transient responseautomotive engine, camshaft
	phaser, dynamic response, feed-gas emissions, internal combustion
	engines, internal exhaust gas recirculation, mean-value model, nonlinear
	dynamic behavior, poles and zeros, position control, throttle position,
	torque control, transient torque response}
}
@inproceedings{Stefanopoulou1997,
  author = {A.G. Stefanopoulou and I. Kolmanovsky},
  title = {Dynamic Scheduling of Internal Exhaust Gas Recirculation Systems},
  booktitle = {IMECE 1997, Sixth ASME Symposium on Advanced Automotive Technologies,
	Proceedings of},
  year = {1997},
  volume = {61},
  pages = {671-678},
  abstract = {In this paper we analyze the nonlinear dynamic behavior of an internal
	exhaust gas recirculation system base on the mean-value model of
	an experimental engine equipped with a camshaft phaser. We develop
	a dynamic camshaft timing schedule that regulates the internal exhaust
	gas recirculation system while maintaining transient engine torque
	response similar to an engine with zero exhaust gas recirculation.
	The dynamic schedule consists of a steady-state map of the camshaft
	timing for optimum exhaust gas recirculation based on throttle position
	and engine speed, and a first order lag that regulates the transition
	of the camshaft timing to the optimum point. A scheme for adjusting
	the time constant of the first order lag depending on engine speed
	and throttle position is described.},
  file = {papers_VVT/imece97.pdf},
  owner = {Admin},
  timestamp = {2009.12.09}
}
@article{Stefanopoulou1999a,
  author = {A. G. Stefanopoulou and J. A. Cook and J. W. Grizzle and J. S. Freudenberg},
  title = {Joint Air-Fuel Ratio and Torque Regulation Using Secondary Cylinder
	Air Flow Actuators},
  journal = {Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control},
  year = {1999},
  volume = {121},
  pages = {638-647},
  number = {4},
  doi = {10.1115/1.2802528},
  file = {papers_VVT/jsecthr.pdf},
  publisher = {ASME},
  url = {http://link.aip.org/link/?JDS/121/638/1}
}
@article{Stefanopoulou1998,
  author = {A. G. Stefanopoulou and J. A. Cook and J. W. Grizzle and J. S. Freudenberg},
  title = {Control-Oriented Model of a Dual Equal Variable Cam Timing Spark
	Ignition Engine},
  journal = {Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control},
  year = {1998},
  volume = {120},
  pages = {257-266},
  number = {2},
  doi = {10.1115/1.2802417},
  file = {papers_VVT/vctMOD.pdf},
  publisher = {ASME},
  url = {http://link.aip.org/link/?JDS/120/257/1}
}
@inproceedings{Wang1999,
  author = {Yan Wang and Stefanopoulou, A. and Levin, M.},
  title = {Idle speed control: an old problem in a new engine design},
  booktitle = {American Control Conference, 1999. Proceedings of the 1999},
  year = {1999},
  volume = {2},
  pages = {1217-1221 vol.2},
  month = {Jun},
  abstract = {The idle speed control problem of a spark ignited engine equipped
	with camless valvetrain is considered. The camless valvetrain allows
	control of the individual cylinder valves and can be used to achieve
	unthrottled operation, and consequently, improve dramatically fuel
	economy. We formulate the speed control problem for this engine and
	show that it exhibits unstable open loop behavior with a significant
	delay in the feedback loop. The instability is intrinsic to the unthrottled
	operation and specific to the camless actuation used to achieve the
	unthrottled operation. The delay is caused by the discrete combustion
	process and the actuator/sensor interface. We demonstrate the inherent
	system limitations associated with the unstable dynamics and the
	delay and provide insight on the structural (plant) changes that
	can alleviate these limitations. Finally, a stabilizing controller
	is designed and tested on a crankangle-based simulation model},
  doi = {10.1109/ACC.1999.783234},
  file = {papers_VVT0/acc99.pdf},
  keywords = {delays, feedback, internal combustion engines, stability, velocity
	controlcamless valvetrain, crankangle-based simulation model, discrete
	combustion process, fuel economy, idle speed control, spark ignited
	engine, stabilizing controller, unstable open loop behavior, unthrottled
	operation}
}
@article{Yilmaz2005,
  author = {Hakan Yilmaz and Anna Stefanopoulou},
  title = {Control of Charge Dilution in Turbocharged Diesel Engines via Exhaust
	Valve Timing},
  journal = {Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control},
  year = {2005},
  volume = {127},
  pages = {363-373},
  number = {3},
  doi = {10.1115/1.1985440},
  file = {papers_VVT/ACC2003_INV0401.pdf},
  keywords = {diesel engines; valves; compressors; MIMO systems; air pollution control},
  publisher = {ASME},
  url = {http://link.aip.org/link/?JDS/127/363/1}
}
@inproceedings{Yilmaz2003,
  author = {Yilmaz, H. and Stefanopoulou, A.},
  title = {Control of charge dilution in turbocharged diesel engines via exhaust
	valve timing},
  booktitle = {American Control Conference, 2003. Proceedings of the},
  year = {2003},
  volume = {1},
  pages = { 761-766 vol.1},
  month = {June},
  file = {papers_VVT/ACC2003_INV0401.pdf},
  issn = {0743-1619 },
  keywords = { MIMO systems, closed loop systems, controllers, diesel engines, nitrogen
	compounds, nonlinear systems, tracking air to fuel ratio, burned
	gas fraction, charge dilution control, closed loop controller, crankangle
	based dynamic nonlinear model, cycle averaged data, cycle sampled
	data, cylinder to cylinder breathing characteristics, exhaust valve
	timing, higher order nonlinear model, internal exhaust gas recirculation,
	low order linear models, model based controller, multi input multi
	output models, optimal tracking, particulate emission, six cylinder
	12 liter turbocharged diesel engine, stringent constraints, transient
	fueling demands, turbocharger dynamics, variable valve timing}
}
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